WikiLeaks publishes ‘biggest ever leak of secret CIA documents’ | Media | The Guardian

The US intelligence agencies are facing fresh embarrassment after WikiLeaks published what it described as the biggest ever leak of confidential documents from the CIA detailing the tools it uses to break into phones, communication apps and other electronic devices.

Fuente: WikiLeaks publishes ‘biggest ever leak of secret CIA documents’ | Media | The Guardian


Wikileaks Dump Shows CIA Could Turn Smart TVs into Listening Devices

It’s difficult to buy a new TV that doesn’t come with a suite of (generally mediocre) “smart” software, giving your home theater some of the functions typically found in phones and tablets. But bringing these extra features into your living room means bringing a microphone, too — a fact the CIA is exploiting, according to a new trove of documents released today by Wikileaks.

Fuente: Wikileaks Dump Shows CIA Could Turn Smart TVs into Listening Devices


Samsung rejects concern over 'Orwellian' privacy policy | Technology | The Guardian

Samsung rejects concern over ‘Orwellian’ privacy policy | Technology | The Guardian.

A Samsung Electronics SUHD smart TV at its launch event in Seoul, February 5, 2015.

 A Samsung Electronics SUHD smart TV at its launch event in Seoul, February 5, 2015. Photograph: Kim Hong-Ji/Reuters

Users of Samsung’s Smart TV devices have raised concerns over the device’s privacy policy, which seems to suggest that they should not discuss any sensitive topics in their living room while the television is plugged in.

The warning relates to the product line’s voice recognition services, which lets users control their television with voice commands input through a microphone on the set’s remote control.

Samsung privacy policy warns: “Please be aware that if your spoken words include personal or other sensitive information, that information will be among the data captured and transmitted to a third party through your use of voice recognition.”

The third-party mentioned is thought to be Massachusetts-based voice recognition company Nuance, which provides the technology to Samsung as a white-label service.

Parker Higgins, an activist for San Francisco-based advocacy group Electronic Frontier Foundation who brought the privacy policy to light, compared the feature to the telescreens in George Orwell’s dystopian novel 1984.