My Friend Cayla: la muñeca prohibida en Alemania que espía a tu familia

La línea de muñecas “My Friend Cayla” ha sido prohibida en Alemania, luego que el gobierno del país europeo descubriera que éstas eran utilizadas para grabar y guardar datos de sus usuarios sin su consentimiento.

Fuente: My Friend Cayla: la muñeca prohibida en Alemania que espía a tu familia


Los datos personales que quedan expuestos al jugar Pokémon GO – Universidad de Chile

Siendo un fenómeno, con más de un millón de usuarios activos en nuestro país, el juego para dispositivos móviles donde se busca capturar a los 151 pokémon genera preocupación no sólo por la integridad física de los jugadores, sino que también por el nivel de información que se accede a dar a la app, así como también por el desconocimiento de estas normas por gran parte de la gente.

Fuente: Los datos personales que quedan expuestos al jugar Pokémon GO – Universidad de Chile


Privacy Scandal Haunts Pokemon Go’s CEO

The suddenly vast scale of Pokemon Go adoption is matched by the game’s aggressive use of personal information. Unlike, say, Twitter, Facebook, or Netflix, the app requires uninterrupted use of your location and camera — a “trove of sensitive user data,” as one privacy watchdog put it in a concerned letter to federal regulators.All the more alarming, then, that Pokemon Go is run by a man whose team literally drove one of the greatest privacy debacles of the internet era, in which Google vehicles, in the course of photographing neighborhoods for the Street View feature of the company’s online maps, secretly copied digital traffic from home networks, scooping up passwords, email messages, medical records, financial information, and audio and video files.

Fuente: Privacy Scandal Haunts Pokemon Go’s CEO


Your kids want to make Minecraft YouTube videos – but should you let them? | Technology | The Guardian

Don’t put your daughter on the stage, Mrs Worthington. But in 2016, what if the stage is YouTube, and your daughter (or son) is demanding to be put on it, playing Minecraft?That’s the dilemma facing a growing number of parents, whose children aren’t just watching YouTube Minecraft channels like The Diamond Minecart, Stampy and CaptainSparklez – they want to follow in their blocky footsteps.

Fuente: Your kids want to make Minecraft YouTube videos – but should you let them? | Technology | The Guardian


Spy agencies in covert push to infiltrate virtual world of online gaming | World news | theguardian.com

Spy agencies in covert push to infiltrate virtual world of online gaming | World news | theguardian.com.

World of Warcraft

World of Warcraft: the NSA described games communities as a ‘target-rich network’ where potential terrorists could ‘hide in plain sight’.

To the National Security Agency analyst writing a briefing to his superiors, the situation was clear: their current surveillance efforts were lacking something. The agency’s impressive arsenal of cable taps and sophisticated hacking attacks was not enough. What it really needed was a horde of undercover Orcs.

That vision of spycraft sparked a concerted drive by the NSA and its UK sister agency GCHQ to infiltrate the massive communities playing onlinegames, according to secret documents disclosed by whistleblower Edward Snowden.

The files were obtained by the Guardian and are being published on Monday in partnership with the New York Times and ProPublica.

The agencies, the documents show, have built mass-collection capabilities against the Xbox Live console network, which has more than 48 million players. Real-life agents have been deployed into virtual realms, from those Orc hordes in World of Warcraft to the human avatars of Second Life. There were attempts, too, to recruit potential informants from the games’ tech-friendly users.

Online gaming is big business, attracting tens of millions of users worldwide who inhabit their digital worlds as make-believe characters, living and competing with the avatars of other players. What the intelligence agencies feared, however, was that among these clans of elves and goblins, terrorists were lurking.

The NSA document, written in 2008 and titled Exploiting Terrorist Use of Games & Virtual Environments, stressed the risk of leaving games communities under-monitored, describing them as a “target-rich communications network” where intelligence targets could “hide in plain sight”.

Games, the analyst wrote, “are an opportunity!”. According to the briefing notes, so many different US intelligence agents were conducting operations inside games that a “deconfliction” group was required to ensure they weren’t spying on, or interfering with, each other.