Derechos Digitales — EEUU protege a las empresas y viola tu privacidad

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Hoy se realizó el lanzamiento del índice de responsabilidad corporativa Ranking Digital Rights 2017, el cual evalúa 22 de las compañías de telecomunicaciones, internet y telefonía móvil, más poderosas del mundo. Pero al mismo tiempo, el senado estadounidense votó a favor de la eliminación de las normas de privacidad de banda ancha que exigían a las empresas prestadoras de servicios de internet (ISP), consentimiento explícito de sus usuarios, para vender o compartir sus datos de navegación web con anunciantes y terceros.


Fiscalía podrá acceder a correos electrónicos desde servidor de SQM – El Mostrador

“Se autorizó por parte del tribunal en el mes de febrero la revisión de los correos electrónicos del señor Patricio Contesse desde un servidor que se obtuvo desde Estados Unidos. Ahí hay más de tres millones de correos electrónicos que hay que revisar y analizar. En consecuencia, es una investigación compleja, ya que para analizar los correos hay que hacer una copia forense, tener programas especiales para segregar correos que han sido autorizados”, sostuvo la fiscal del caso SQM, Paola Castiglione.

Fuente: Fiscalía podrá acceder a correos electrónicos desde servidor de SQM – El Mostrador


Google se equivoca: el TPP, varios pasos hacia atrás para Internet | R3D: Red en Defensa de los Derechos Digitales

La postura de Google sorprende a la luz de posiciones previas en favor de un Internet libre y abierto. El TPP, contrario a lo expresado por la empresa, es una de las principales amenazas a Internet, a las democracias y los derechos humanos.

Fuente: Google se equivoca: el TPP, varios pasos hacia atrás para Internet | R3D: Red en Defensa de los Derechos Digitales


Security fears over FBI contracting out highly sensitive surveillance documents | US news | The Guardian

The FBI has contracted out with a private firm to handle, distribute and monitor highly sensitive surveillance documents, in an arrangement veteran FBI agents consider a potential privacy and counterintelligence risk.

Fuente: Security fears over FBI contracting out highly sensitive surveillance documents | US news | The Guardian


Snowden insiste en defender la protección de la privacidad en la red – El Mostrador

“Si se dice que la privacidad me da igual porque no tengo nada que ocultar, entonces sería como decir que te da igual la libertad de expresión porque no tienes nada que decir”, explicó el ex analista de inteligencia estadounidense.

Fuente: Snowden insiste en defender la protección de la privacidad en la red – El Mostrador


Revealed: how facial recognition has invaded shops – and your privacy | Cities | The Guardian

Retailers are increasingly using facial recognition technology to track your face. With an estimated 59% of UK fashion retailers doing it, is the anonymity of cities an outdated idea?

Fuente: Revealed: how facial recognition has invaded shops – and your privacy | Cities | The Guardian


El TPP amenaza derechos humanos

En materia de comercio electrónico se obliga a los países a permitir la transferencia transfronteriza de información por medios electrónicos, aun cuando dicha información sea de carácter personal o sensible, sin la consideración de que dichos países cuenten con un nivel adecuado de protección de datos personales. Además, se supedita la protección de datos personales a los requerimientos del comercio internacional.

Fuente: El TPP amenaza derechos humanos


Just Before Passing Surveillance Expansion, Lawmakers Partied With Pro-CISA Lobbyists

The night before Congress passed legislation to expand surveillance power, legislators attended a party with the chief lobbyists for the bill.

Fuente: Just Before Passing Surveillance Expansion, Lawmakers Partied With Pro-CISA Lobbyists


Cyber criminals lead race to innovate – FT.com

Cyber criminals lead race to innovate – FT.com.

 

Devices to simulate cyber crimes are displayed at Interpol Global Complex for Innovation (IGCI) at its newly built building during the inauguration opening ceremony in Singapore on April 13, 2015. The Interpol Global Centre for Innovation opened its doors with officials hoping it will strengthen global efforts to fight increasingly tech-savvy international criminals. AFP PHOTO / ROSLAN RAHMAN©AFP

Cyber criminals are advancing faster than companies can defend themselves, with denial of service attacks worsening, ransoms on the rise and data breaches targeting more high-profile retailers, according to two widely followed reports from cyber security companies.

Five out of six large companies were targeted by an advanced hacker last year, up 40 per cent from the year before, according to a report compiled by Symantec, the internet security company.

He said the cyber world was similar to the business world, with criminals selling more ways to attack companies to meet demand, and copying their rivals’ most lucrative tactics.Kevin Haley, director of Symantec’s security response product and an author of the report, said the threat continued to rise because criminals had been so successful.

 


How Big Business Is Helping Expand NSA Surveillance, Snowden Be Damned – The Intercept

How Big Business Is Helping Expand NSA Surveillance, Snowden Be Damned – The Intercept.

Featured photo - How Big Business Is Helping Expand NSA Surveillance, Snowden Be Damned

Since November 11, 2011, with the introduction of the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, American spy agencies have been pushing laws to encourage corporations to share more customer information. They repeatedly failed, thanks in part to NSA contractor Edward Snowden’s revelations of mass government surveillance. Then came Republican victories in last year’s midterm Congressional elections and a major push by corporate interests in favor of the legislation.

Today, the bill is back, largely unchanged, and if congressional insiders and the bill’s sponsors are to believed, the legislation could end up on President Obama’s desk as soon as this month. In another boon to the legislation, Obama is expected to reverse his past opposition and sign it, albeit in an amended and renamed form (CISPA is now CISA, the “Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act”). The reversal comes in the wake of high-profile hacks on JPMorgan Chase and Sony Pictures Entertainment. The bill has also benefitted greatly from lobbying by big business, which sees it as a way to cut costs and to shift some anti-hacking defenses onto the government.

For all its appeal to corporations, CISA represents a major new privacy threat to individual citizens. It lays the groundwork for corporations to feed massive amounts of communications to private consortiums and the federal government, a scale of cooperation even greater than that revealed by Snowden. The law also breaks new ground in suppressing pushback against privacy invasions; in exchange for channeling data to the government, businesses are granted broad legal immunity from privacy lawsuits — potentially leaving consumers without protection if companies break privacy promises that would otherwise keep information out of the hands of authorities.

Ostensibly, CISA is supposed to help businesses guard against cyberattacks by sharing information on threats with one another and with the government. Attempts must be made to filter personal information out of the pool of data that is shared. But the legislation — at least as marked up by the Senate Intelligence Committee — provides an expansive definition of what can be construed as a cybersecurity threat, including any information for responding to or mitigating “an imminent threat of death, serious bodily harm, or serious economic harm,” or information that is potentially related to threats relating to weapons of mass destruction, threats to minors, identity theft, espionage, protection of trade secrets, and other possible offenses. Asked at a hearing in February how quickly such information could be shared with the FBI, CIA, or NSA, Deputy Undersecretary for Cybersecurity Phyllis Schneck replied, “fractions of a second.”

Questions persist on how to more narrowly define a cybersecurity threat, what type of personal data is shared, and which government agencies would retain and store this data. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., who cast the lone dissenting vote against CISA on the Senate Intelligence Committee, declared the legislation “a surveillance bill by another name.” Privacy advocates agree. “The lack of use limitations creates yet another loophole for law enforcement to conduct backdoor searches on Americans,” argues aletter sent by a coalition of privacy organizations, including Free Press Action Fund and New America’s Open Technology Institute. Critics also argue that CISA would not have prevented the recent spate of high-profile hacking incidents. As the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Mark Jaycox noted in a blog post, the JPMorgan hack occurred because of an “un-updated server” and prevailing evidence about the Sony breach is “increasingly pointing to an inside job.”

But the intelligence community and corporate America have this year unified behind the bill. For a look into the breadth of the corporate advocacy campaign to pass CISA, see this letter cosigned by many of the most powerful corporate interests in America and sent to legislators earlier this year. Or another letter, reported in the Wall Street Journal, signed by “general counsels of more than 30 different firms, including 3M and Lockheed Martin Corp.”


PGP creator Phil Zimmermann: 'Intelligence agencies have never had it so good' | Technology | The Guardian

PGP creator Phil Zimmermann: ‘Intelligence agencies have never had it so good’ | Technology | The Guardian.

Phil Zimmermann: 'End-to-end encryption is everywhere now: in browsers, online banking...'

 Phil Zimmermann: ‘End-to-end encryption is everywhere now: in browsers, online banking…’

The recent hack against Sony Pictures is likely to have made companies of all sizes consider upping their cybersecurity measures. Perhaps, though, it’s also a different kind of wake-up call: a reason to think less about security, and more about privacy.

That’s the belief of Phil Zimmermann – the creator of email encryption software Pretty Good Privacy (PGP), and now president and co-founder of secure communications company Silent Circle – initially expressed in a blog post, and expanded on in an interview with the Guardian.

“Sony had all kinds of things: intrusion detection, firewalls, antivirus … But they got hacked anyway. The security measures that enterprises do frequently get breached. People break in anyway: they overcome them,” says Zimmermann.

“A lot of this stuff could have been encrypted. If those emails had been encrypted with PGP or GnuPG, the hackers wouldn’t have gotten very far. Those movie scripts that they stole? They could have been encrypted too.”

Zimmermann hopes that companies will look at what happened to Sony, and use it as a spur to explore encryption as a way to protect their employees’ privacy, rather than ramping up their spending on security measures to protect their data.

“People don’t think of privacy much when they think about enterprises, but enterprise privacy is a real thing: it’s the collective privacy of everybody in the company, and the privacy of the company assets as well,” he says.

“In Sony’s case, there were emails about Hollywood actresses that got breached. That’s connected with personal privacy. I think companies retain too much information.”

If more businesses shift their thinking from security to privacy, it’ll be good news for Silent Circle, which offers technology for encrypted voice calls, video chat and messaging, as well as being a key part of the privacy-focused Blackphonesmartphone.


Obama coloca la ciberseguridad en el centro del debate en EE UU | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Obama coloca la ciberseguridad en el centro del debate en EE UU | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

El presidente propone un paquete legislativo en un momento de crecientes ataques informáticos y tras el inicio del nuevo Congreso

Obama, en su discurso sobre ciberseguridad. / Evan Vucci (AP)

Varios ataques informáticos recientes han colocado la ciberseguridad entre los grandes debates políticos en Estados Unidos. El presidente Barack Obama busca aprovechar este contexto favorable y la nueva legislatura en el Congreso -con mayoría republicana- para tratar de sacar adelante un paquete legislativo que endurece la lucha contra la piratería informática.

La Casa Blanca presentó en 2011 una propuesta de ley sobre ciberseguridad, que avanzó en la Cámara de Representantes republicana, pero no prosperó en el Senado, controlado hasta hace una semana por el Partido Demócrata de Obama. Este martes, el presidente hizo un nuevo intento al anunciar una iniciativa que coincide en grandes líneas con la de hace cuatro años.

“Las amenazas cibernéticas son urgentes y un peligro creciente”, afirmó Obama en un breve discurso en el Centro Nacional de Ciberseguridad, a las afueras de Washington. “El ataque a Sony, la cuenta de Twitter [del Ejército] pirateada [el lunes] por simpatizantes de yihadistas islámicos demuestran que el sector público y privado tienen que hacer mucho más trabajo en fortalecer nuestra ciberseguridad”, había dicho en una reunión con los líderes del Congreso, poco antes de desvelar su plan.

El paquete legislativo forma parte de las iniciativas que Obama expondrá el próximo martes en su discurso anual en el Capitolio sobre el estado de la Unión. La semana pasada, el presidente ya avanzó otra propuesta sobre el sistema universitario. No es habitual que un presidente anticipe con tanto detalle algunas claves de su discurso. Con ello, Obama busca crear un terreno favorable en la opinión pública y entre los legisladores.

Su propuesta en ciberseguridad medirá el apetito del Congreso en endurecer la ley en ese ámbito en un momento de crecientes ataques informáticos en EE UU. Al margen de Sony y las redes del Ejército, las incursiones también han afectado en los últimos meses a grandes empresas, como Target, Home Depot y JPMorgan. El plan del presidente también determinará el peso del respeto a la privacidad -que ha hecho descarrilar las iniciativas legales anteriores- en el debate político un año y medio después de destapar el exanalista Edward Snowden el espionaje masivo de la Agencia Nacional de Seguridad (NSA).

Obama propone actuar en tres ámbitos: conceder protección legal a las empresas que compartan con el Gobierno información sobre amenazas informáticas, dotar de más poderes a la justicia para investigar y perseguir a los autores de ataques y la compraventa de información sustraída a empresas y particulares; y armonizar la amalgama de leyes estatales que obligan a las compañías a notificar a los clientes si sus datos pueden haber sido robados.


Datos personales: Gobierno finaliza trabajo prelegislativo y redacta proyecto

Datos personales: Gobierno finaliza trabajo prelegislativo y redacta proyecto.

Subsecretaria de Economía explicó que la iniciativa incluirá una nueva institucionalidad, multas por hasta $400 millones y cinco derechos que implica el consentimiento expreso de las personas para que las empresas manejen sus datos.C. TORRES Y M. LEIVA | ECONOMÍA | 05:00 HRS

© Agencia Uno

Un mes estuvo en consulta  pública el anteproyecto que busca elaborar un nuevo cuerpo de ley de protección de datos personales. En este proceso, que concluyó la semana pasada, participaron con sugerencias y comentarios representantes de organizaciones empresariales y no gubernamentales. Así lo indica la subsecretaria de Economía, Katia Trusich, quien explica que  un equipo al interior de la cartera está procesando los comentarios y observaciones de los diversos actores para responderlos antes del 5 de octubre, y definir el articulado que espera enviar al Congreso este año.

Paralelamente funcionó una mesa con el sector privado, donde participaron la Asociación de Bancos, la Cámara de Comercio de Santiago, la Cámara Nacional de Comercio, el Comité de Retail Financiero, entre 13 instituciones

“Nos hemos reunido con todos los actores y esperamos llegar a un consenso para poder sacar adelante esta iniciativa en el Congreso”, agrega la abogada.

No obstante, dentro del sector privado no se ve con “buenos ojos” la intención del gobierno de regular este campo, y en varios seminarios ha sido mencionado como uno de los temas que genera incertidumbre.

Para fundamentar la acción del gobierno, Trusich recuerda que nuestro país fue pionero en Latinoamérica en legislar sobre protección de datos personales en 1999, a través de la Ley 19.628 sobre el resguardo de la vida privada. Sin embargo, los avances tecnológicos la han dejado obsoleta.


Reports of the Death of a National License-Plate Tracking Database Have Been Greatly Exaggerated – The Intercept

Reports of the Death of a National License-Plate Tracking Database Have Been Greatly Exaggerated – The Intercept.

By 
Featured photo - Reports of the Death of a National License-Plate Tracking Database Have Been Greatly ExaggeratedScreengrab from Vigilant Solutions YouTube demo of its location-tracking service.

In a  February 19 front-page story, the Washington Post appeared to be breaking news of yet another massive federal surveillance program invading the privacy of innocent Americans.

The Department of Homeland Security, the story said, had drawn up plans to develop a national license-plate tracking database, giving the feds the ability to monitor the movements of tens of millions of drivers — a particularly intrusive form of suspicionless bulk surveillance, considering how strongly we Americans feel it’s none of the government’s business where and when we come and go.

The next day, however, the Post called off the alarm. The plan, the newspaper reported, had been canceled. Threat averted. Move along.

But the Post had gotten it all wrong. DHS wasn’t planning to create a national license-plate tracking database — because several already exist, owned by different private companies, and extensively used by law enforcement agencies including DHS for years.

The only thing actually new at DHS — the solicitation for services the Post decided was front-page news — was a different form of paperwork to pay for access.

And far from going away, the databases are growing at a furious pace due to rapidly improving technology and ample federal grant money for more cameras and more computers. Tens if not hundreds of millions of observations per month are streaming into bulging electronic archives, often remaining there indefinitely, for a vast array of clients in both the public and private sector.

So rather than being the tale of an averted threat, the bulk license-plate tracking saga is actually a story about yet another previously unimaginable loss of privacy in the modern information age.