El académico que cree que hay que terminar con el “monopolio de Google” (y hacerlo rápido) – El Mostrador

Las grandes empresas tecnológicas como Google, Facebook y Amazon actúan prácticamente como monopolios. Así lo considera el académico Jonathan Taplin, quien advierte de los riesgos de prolongar esta situación, también para la democracia. BBC Mundo habló con él.

Fuente: El académico que cree que hay que terminar con el “monopolio de Google” (y hacerlo rápido) – El Mostrador


Lawsuit Seeks Transparency as Searches of Cellphones and Laptops Skyrocket at Borders

A number of recent cases in the media have revealed instances of U.S. citizens and others being compelled by CBP agents to unlock their devices for search. In some instances, people have claimed to have been physically coerced into complying, including one American citizen who said that CBP agents grabbed him by the neck in order to take his cellphone out of his possession.

Fuente: Lawsuit Seeks Transparency as Searches of Cellphones and Laptops Skyrocket at Borders


Secret Docs Reveal: President Trump Has Inherited an FBI With Vast Hidden Powers

For example, the bureau’s agents can decide that a campus organization is not “legitimate” and therefore not entitled to robust protections for free speech; dig for derogatory information on potential informants without any basis for believing they are implicated in unlawful activity; use a person’s immigration status to pressure them to collaborate and then help deport them when they are no longer useful; conduct invasive “assessments” without any reason for suspecting the targets of wrongdoing; demand that companies provide the bureau with personal data about their users in broadly worded national security letters without actual legal authority to do so; fan out across the internet along with a vast army of informants, infiltrating countless online chat rooms; peer through the walls of private homes; and more. The FBI offered various justifications of these tactics to our reporters. But the documents and our reporting on them ultimately reveal a bureaucracy in dire need of greater transparency and accountability.

Fuente: Secret Docs Reveal: President Trump Has Inherited an FBI With Vast Hidden Powers


Privacy experts fear Donald Trump accessing global surveillance network | World news | The Guardian

Privacy activists, human rights campaigners and former US security officials have expressed fears over the prospect of Donald Trump gaining access to the vast global US and UK surveillance network.

Fuente: Privacy experts fear Donald Trump accessing global surveillance network | World news | The Guardian


Snowden insiste en defender la protección de la privacidad en la red – El Mostrador

“Si se dice que la privacidad me da igual porque no tengo nada que ocultar, entonces sería como decir que te da igual la libertad de expresión porque no tienes nada que decir”, explicó el ex analista de inteligencia estadounidense.

Fuente: Snowden insiste en defender la protección de la privacidad en la red – El Mostrador


The Panama Papers: public interest disclosure v the right to private legal advice | David Allen Green

There have been two main responses to the leak of the Panama Papers.The first has been a great shrug of indifference: so what? The rich and powerful do things that only the rich and powerful can do. The second is a warm, indeed enthusiastic, welcome to this dramatic exercise in transparency: we can now see how the rich and powerful do the things that only the rich and powerful can do. The political consequences of the leak, for example in Iceland and the UK, indicate that the transparency in turn is leading to greater accountability.Are these the only valid responses? Is there any issue here about privacy and the right to confidential legal advice? Or are such concerns mere fusspottery and point-missing?

Fuente: The Panama Papers: public interest disclosure v the right to private legal advice | David Allen Green


What Bad, Shameful, Dirty Behavior is U.S. Judge Richard Posner Hiding? Demand to Know. – The Intercept

What Bad, Shameful, Dirty Behavior is U.S. Judge Richard Posner Hiding? Demand to Know. – The Intercept.Featured photo - What Bad, Shameful, Dirty Behavior is U.S. Judge Richard Posner Hiding? Demand to Know.

 


(updated below)

Richard Posner has been a federal appellate judge for 34 years, having been nominated by President Reagan in 1981. At a conference last week in Washington, Posner said the NSA should have the unlimited ability to collect whatever communications and other information it wants: “If the NSA wants to vacuum all the trillions of bits of information that are crawling through the electronic worldwide networks, I think that’s fine.” The NSA should have “carte blanche” to collect what it wants because “privacy interests should really have very little weight when you’re talking about national security.”

His rationale? “I think privacy is actually overvalued,” the distinguished jurist pronounced. Privacy, he explained, is something people crave in order to prevent others from learning about the shameful and filthy things they do:

Much of what passes for the name of privacy is really just trying to conceal the disreputable parts of your conduct. Privacy is mainly about trying to improve your social and business opportunities by concealing the sorts of bad activities that would cause other people not to want to deal with you. 

Unlike you and your need to hide your bad and dirty acts, Judge Posner has no need for privacy – or so he claims: “If someone drained my cell phone, they would find a picture of my cat, some phone numbers, some email addresses, some email text,” he said. “What’s the big deal?” He added: “Other people must have really exciting stuff. Do they narrate their adulteries, or something like that?”

I would like to propose a campaign inspired by Judge Posner’s claims (just by the way, one of his duties as a federal judge is to uphold the Fourth Amendment). In doing so, I’ll make the following observations:


Quieren más información porque quieren más poder: #StopSpying #DontSpyOnUs #TheDayWeFightBack | Manzana Mecánica

Quieren más información porque quieren más poder: #StopSpying #DontSpyOnUs #TheDayWeFightBack | Manzana Mecánica.

Todo este asunto de la vigilancia en Internet puede resumirse así: los gobiernos quieren más control sobre los gobernados.

Quizás pienses que tu información personal no vale nada, que no sirve de nada. Dónde estuviste ayer, por probablemente un montón de gente te vió y sabe dónde estuviste ayer.
Pero no es lo mismo la información de una persona que la de muchas personas.

Imagina que esa información personal acerca de tí es el gas dentro de un mechero/encendedor. Puede ocasionar una llama, pero no es gran cosa. Cualquiera puede tener uno de éstos.

Si ahora piensas en un cilindro/bombona de gas, que en esta analogía podría ser la información de miles de personas, hay algunas reglas, un grosor mínimo del metal, unos estándares.

Pero si quieres 12 metros cúbicos de gas butano en tu patio, o la información personal de cientos de miles de personas, hay bastante papeleo que hacer. A nadie le conviene que se acumule tanto en un lugar sin que existan los resguardos necesarios.

Y para un gasómetro o gran contenedor de gas, que sería la información personal de millones de personas, algo que puede ser tremendamente destructivo, es en el interés de todos que no te permitan hacerlo sin una cuidadosa inspección y los permisos adecuados.