Mexican spy scandal escalates as study shows software targeted opposition | World news | The Guardian

The spy software – known as Pegasus and made by the Israeli firm NSO Group – is only sold to governments, supposedly for use against terrorists and criminals. But an investigation by researchers at the University of Toronto revealed that it was deployed against Mexican anti-corruption crusaders, journalists investigating the president, and activists pushing for a soda tax.

Fuente: Mexican spy scandal escalates as study shows software targeted opposition | World news | The Guardian


Shadow Brokers threaten to unleash more hacking tools | Technology | The Guardian

The so-called Shadow Brokers, who claimed responsibility for releasing NSA tools that were used to spread the WannaCry ransomware through the NHS and across the world, said they have a new suite of tools and vulnerabilities in newer software. The possible targets include Microsoft’s Windows 10, which was unaffected by the initial attack and is on at least 500m devices around the world.

Fuente: Shadow Brokers threaten to unleash more hacking tools | Technology | The Guardian


Japan Made Secret Deals With the NSA That Expanded Global Surveillance

The documents, published Monday in collaboration with Japanese news broadcaster NHK, reveal the complicated relationship the NSA has maintained with Japan over a period of more than six decades. Japan has allowed NSA to maintain at least three bases on its territory and contributed more than half a billion dollars to help finance the NSA’s facilities and operations. In return, NSA has kitted out Japanese spies with powerful surveillance tools and shared intelligence with them. However, there is a duplicitous dimension to the partnership. While the NSA has maintained friendly ties with its Japanese counterparts and benefited from their financial generosity, at the same time it has secretly spied on Japanese officials and institutions.

Fuente: Japan Made Secret Deals With the NSA That Expanded Global Surveillance


Wiretaps, data dumps and zero days: is digital privacy no longer possible? – video | World news | The Guardian

From Russian hacking to WikiLeaks, Edward Snowden and CIA cyber weapons, does digital surveillance mean the end of privacy?

Fuente: Wiretaps, data dumps and zero days: is digital privacy no longer possible? – video | World news | The Guardian


Gobiernos en guerra contra WhatsApp por su cifrado de extremo a extremo – El Mostrador

Tras el ataque al Parlamento Británico ocurrido la semana pasada, los políticos británicos han exigido que Whatsapp y otras aplicaciones de mensajería instantánea proporcionen acceso a la policía y fuerzas de seguridad para así poder monitorear conversaciones terroristas. Sin embargo, los expertos en tecnología discuten que abrir las “puertas traseras” de los servicios de mensajería popular, las cuales usan cifrado de extremo a extremo, arrojaría una serie de problemas.

Fuente: Gobiernos en guerra contra WhatsApp por su cifrado de extremo a extremo – El Mostrador


Apple Says It Fixed CIA Vulnerabilities Years Ago

Yesterday, WikiLeaks released its latest batch of pilfered CIA material, five documents describing malicious software for taking over Apple MacBooks and iPhones, and wrote in an accompanying post that “the CIA has been infecting the iPhone supply chain of its targets,” prompting concerned readers to wonder if their iPhone or MacBook had been infected on the factory floor. In a statement, Apple says that is almost certainly not the case.

Fuente: Apple Says It Fixed CIA Vulnerabilities Years Ago


Wikileaks filtra nuevos documentos secretos sobre cómo “hackeaba” la CIA cualquier iPhone o Mac – El Mostrador

Bajo el nombre “Dark Matter” Wikileaks publicó una nueva tanda de documentos secretos, en los que detalla varios proyectos de la CIA para lograr infectar y “hackear” cualquier iPhone o Mac.

Fuente: Wikileaks filtra nuevos documentos secretos sobre cómo “hackeaba” la CIA cualquier iPhone o Mac – El Mostrador


With the latest WikiLeaks revelations about the CIA – is privacy really dead? | World news | The Guardian

Both the Snowden revelations and the CIA leak highlight the variety of creative techniques intelligence agencies can use to spy on individuals, at a time when many of us are voluntarily giving up our personal data to private companies and installing so-called “smart” devices with microphones (smart TVs, Amazon Echo) in our homes.So, where does this leave us? Is privacy really dead, as Silicon Valley luminaries such as Mark Zuckerberg have previously declared?

Fuente: With the latest WikiLeaks revelations about the CIA – is privacy really dead? | World news | The Guardian


Malware Attacks Used by the U.S. Government Retain Potency for Many Years, New Evidence Indicates

A new report from Rand Corp. may help shed light on the government’s arsenal of malicious software, including the size of its stockpile of so-called “zero days” — hacks that hit undisclosed vulnerabilities in computers, smartphones, and other digital devices.The report also provides evidence that such vulnerabilities are long lasting. The findings are of particular interest because not much is known about the U.S. government’s controversial use of zero days.

Fuente: Malware Attacks Used by the U.S. Government Retain Potency for Many Years, New Evidence Indicates


WikiLeaks publishes ‘biggest ever leak of secret CIA documents’ | Media | The Guardian

The US intelligence agencies are facing fresh embarrassment after WikiLeaks published what it described as the biggest ever leak of confidential documents from the CIA detailing the tools it uses to break into phones, communication apps and other electronic devices.

Fuente: WikiLeaks publishes ‘biggest ever leak of secret CIA documents’ | Media | The Guardian


Wikileaks Dump Shows CIA Could Turn Smart TVs into Listening Devices

It’s difficult to buy a new TV that doesn’t come with a suite of (generally mediocre) “smart” software, giving your home theater some of the functions typically found in phones and tablets. But bringing these extra features into your living room means bringing a microphone, too — a fact the CIA is exploiting, according to a new trove of documents released today by Wikileaks.

Fuente: Wikileaks Dump Shows CIA Could Turn Smart TVs into Listening Devices


WikiLeaks filtra programa encubierto de la CIA que usa celulares y televisores como “micrófonos encubiertos” – El Mostrador

La información revelada hoy sobre “hacking” (ataque cibernético) es parte de una serie en siete entregas que define como “la mayor filtración de datos de inteligencia de la historia”.

Fuente: WikiLeaks filtra programa encubierto de la CIA que usa celulares y televisores como “micrófonos encubiertos” – El Mostrador


The FBI Hacked Over 8,000 Computers In 120 Countries Based on One Warrant | Motherboard

In January, Motherboard reported on the FBI’s “unprecedented” hacking operation, in which the agency, using a single warrant, deployed malware to over one thousand alleged visitors of a dark web child pornography site. Now, it has emerged that the campaign was actually an order of magnitude larger.

Fuente: The FBI Hacked Over 8,000 Computers In 120 Countries Based on One Warrant | Motherboard


Spies for Hire

While cybersecurity companies traditionally aim to ensure that the code in software and hardware is free of flaws — mistakes that malicious hackers can take advantage of — DarkMatter, according to sources familiar with the company’s activities, was trying to find and exploit these flaws in order to install malware. DarkMatter could take over a nearby surveillance camera or cellphone and basically do whatever it wanted with it — conduct surveillance, interfere with or change any electronic messages it emitted, or block the signals entirely.

Fuente: Spies for Hire


Ex-Yahoo Employee: Government Spy Program Could Have Given a Hacker Access to All Email

Contrary to a denial by Yahoo and a report by the New York Times, the company’s scanning program, revealed earlier this week by Reuters, provided the government with a custom-built back door into the company’s mail service — and it was so sloppily installed that it posed a privacy hazard for hundreds of millions of users, according to a former Yahoo employee with knowledge of the company’s security practices.

Fuente: Ex-Yahoo Employee: Government Spy Program Could Have Given a Hacker Access to All Email


Amistosa Caja Anti Vigilancia | Derechos Digitales

Con mucho orgullo y de manera oficial, Derechos Digitales presenta hoy la Amistosa Caja Anti Vigilancia, un conjunto de herramientas y consejos prácticos que te ayudarán a resguardar mejor tu información personal y la de otros. Pareciera ser que hoy más que nunca es necesario proteger nuestros datos, pues siempre hay alguien intentando acceder a ellos: empresas privadas, cibercriminales y el mismo Estado.

Fuente: Amistosa Caja Anti Vigilancia | Derechos Digitales


Se cumple el aniversario de la filtración masiva de datos del Hacking Team | R3D: Red en Defensa de los Derechos Digitales

Hace un año, más de mil 500 correos electrónicos y 400 GB de información de la empresa italiana Hacking Team, dedicada a la venta de software para vigilancia, fueron hechos públicos.

Fuente: Se cumple el aniversario de la filtración masiva de datos del Hacking Team | R3D: Red en Defensa de los Derechos Digitales


FBI’s Secret Surveillance Tech Budget Is ‘Hundreds of Millions’

The FBI has “hundreds of millions of dollars” to spend on developing technology for use in both national security and domestic law enforcement investigations — but it won’t reveal the exact amount.

Fuente: FBI’s Secret Surveillance Tech Budget Is ‘Hundreds of Millions’


Tedic rechaza afirmaciones del Gobierno sobre sistemas de espionaje

La organización no gubernamental Tecnología, Educación, Desarrollo, Investigación y Comunicación (Tedic) rechazó las expresiones del ministro de la Secretaría Nacional Antidrogas (Senad), Luis Rojas, sobre el sistema de espionaje adquirido por el Gobierno. Pide transparencia y rendición de cuentas.

Fuente: Tedic rechaza afirmaciones del Gobierno sobre sistemas de espionaje


Senad asume compra de software para ubicar a personas – Paraguay.com

Paraguay: Meses atrás trascendió la información acerca de un software espía adquirido por el Gobierno. Desde la Senad asumen la compra, sin embargo aseguran que no sirve para vigilar sino solo para ubicar a las personas.

Fuente: Senad asume compra de software para ubicar a personas – Paraguay.com


The Vigilante Who Hacked Hacking Team Explains How He Did It | Motherboard

Back in July of last year, the controversial government spying and hacking tool seller Hacking Team was hacked itself by an outside attacker. The breach made headlines worldwide, but no one knew much about the perpetrator or how he did it.That mystery has finally been revealed.

Fuente: The Vigilante Who Hacked Hacking Team Explains How He Did It | Motherboard


Ron Wyden vows to filibuster anti-cryptography bill / Boing Boing

Senators Richard Burr [R-NC] and Dianne Feinstein [D-CA] finally introduced their long-rumored anti-crypto bill, which will ban US companies from making products with working cryptography, mandating that US-made products have some way to decrypt information without the user’s permission.

Fuente: Ron Wyden vows to filibuster anti-cryptography bill / Boing Boing


Reino Unido espía a los refugiados hackeando sus móviles y ordenadores

Los refugiados no tienen derechos. De ahí se deriva que sus teléfonos pueden ser hackeados y sus ordenadores también. Al parecer, esto es lo que ha hecho -legalmente y según The Observer – los funcionarios de la oficina de inmigración británica. En 2013 recibieron poderes para hackear los dispositivos electrónicos de todos los refugiados y peticionarios de asilo que considerasen necesario. Y lo consideran.

Fuente: Reino Unido espía a los refugiados hackeando sus móviles y ordenadores


The CIA Is Investing in Firms That Mine Your Tweets and Instagram Photos

SOFT ROBOTS THAT can grasp delicate objects, computer algorithms designed to spot an “insider threat,” and artificial intelligence that will sift through large data sets — these are just a few of the technologies being pursued by companies with investment from In-Q-Tel, the CIA’s venture capital firm, according to a document obtained by The Intercept.

Fuente: The CIA Is Investing in Firms That Mine Your Tweets and Instagram Photos


Forget Apple's fight with the FBI – our privacy catastrophe has only just begun | Technology | The Guardian

The privacy crisis is a disaster of our own making – and now the tech firms who gathered our data are trying to make money out of privacy

Fuente: Forget Apple’s fight with the FBI – our privacy catastrophe has only just begun | Technology | The Guardian


Exclusive: Snowden intelligence docs reveal UK spooks' malware checklist / Boing Boing

Boing Boing is proud to publish two original documents disclosed by Edward Snowden, in connection with “Sherlock Holmes and the Adventure of the Extraordinary Rendition,” a short story …

Fuente: Exclusive: Snowden intelligence docs reveal UK spooks’ malware checklist / Boing Boing


Apple's Tim Cook defends encryption. When will other tech CEOs do so? | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian

More high-profile titans need to use their platforms to make crystal clear how important encryption is to users everywhere

Fuente: Apple’s Tim Cook defends encryption. When will other tech CEOs do so? | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian


Apple believes bill creates ‘key under doormat for bad guys’ – FT.com

Shortly after Theresa May introduced the draft Investigatory Powers bill in November to update the UK’s surveillance laws for the internet age, the home secretary met privately with Tim Cook, Apple’s chief executive. He laid out a number of

Fuente: Apple believes bill creates ‘key under doormat for bad guys’ – FT.com


Documents Reveal Canada’s Secret Hacking Tactics – The Intercept

Documents Reveal Canada’s Secret Hacking Tactics – The Intercept.

Featured photo - Documents Reveal Canada’s Secret Hacking Tactics

Canada’s electronic surveillance agency has secretly developed an arsenal of cyber weapons capable of stealing data and destroying adversaries’ infrastructure, according to newly revealed classified documents.

Communications Security Establishment, or CSE, has also covertly hacked into computers across the world to gather intelligence, breaking into networks in Europe, Mexico, the Middle East, and North Africa, the documents show.

The revelations, reported Monday by CBC News in collaboration with The Intercept, shine a light for the first time on how Canada has adopted aggressive tactics to attack, sabotage, and infiltrate targeted computer systems.

The latest disclosures come as the Canadian government debates whether to hand over more powers to its spies to disrupt threats as part of the controversial anti-terrorism law, Bill C-51.

Christopher Parsons, a surveillance expert at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab, told CBC News that the new revelations showed that Canada’s computer networks had already been “turned into a battlefield without any Canadian being asked: Should it be done? How should it be done?”

According to documents obtained by The Intercept from National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden, CSE has a wide range of powerful tools to perform “computer network exploitation” and “computer network attack” operations. These involve hacking into networks to either gather intelligence or to damage adversaries’ infrastructure, potentially including electricity, transportation or banking systems. The most well-known example of a state-sponsored “attack” operation involved the use of Stuxnet, a computer worm that was reportedly developed by the United States and Israel to sabotage Iranian nuclear facilities.


Apple and Google 'FREAK attack' leaves millions of users vulnerable to hackers | Technology | The Guardian

Apple and Google ‘FREAK attack’ leaves millions of users vulnerable to hackers | Technology | The Guardian.

The Apple logo inside an Apple store in Tokyo. The company is working to fix a potential security issue which could leave devices vulnerable to hackers. The Apple logo inside an Apple store in Tokyo. The company is working to fix a potential security issue which could leave devices vulnerable to hackers. Photograph: Yuya Shino/Reuters

Millions of people may have been left vulnerable to hackers while surfing the web on Apple and Google devices, thanks to a newly discovered security flaw known as “FREAK attack.”

There’s no evidence so far that any hackers have exploited the weakness, which companies are now moving to repair. Researchers blame the problem on an old government policy, abandoned over a decade ago, which required US software makers to use weaker security in encryption programs sold overseas due to national security concerns.

Many popular websites and some internet browsers continued to accept the weaker software, or can be tricked into using it, according to experts at several research institutions who reported their findings Tuesday.

They said that could make it easier for hackers to break the encryption that’s supposed to prevent digital eavesdropping when a visitor types sensitive information into a website.

About a third of all encrypted websites were vulnerable as of Tuesday, including sites operated by American Express, Groupon, Kohl’s, Marriott and some government agencies, the researchers said.


Hackers take down Lenovo website – FT.com

Hackers take down Lenovo website – FT.com.

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February 26, 2015 2:45 am

Hackers take down Lenovo website

 

A pedestrian walks past the Lenovo Group Ltd. flagship store on Qianmen Street in Beijing, China, on Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014. Lenovo Chief Executive Officer Yang Yuanqing has expanded in computer servers and mobile phones, including the $2.91 billion purchase of Motorola Mobility, to help combat a shrinking personal-computer market. Photographer: Tomohiro Ohsumi/Bloomberg©Bloomberg

Lenovo’s website has been hacked, less than a week after the personal computer maker was forced to disable controversial software that left users of its laptops vulnerable to cyber attacks.

On Thursday, the group – the world’s largest PC manufacturer by unit sales – said that users trying to visit its website had been redirected to another site by hackers.Hacker collective Lizard Squad had claimed credit for the attack via Twitter, where it also posted internal Lenovo e-mails discussing Superfish, the advertising software that the PC maker disabled on its products last week.

Lizard Squad has previously claimed credit for cyber attacks on Sony’s PlayStation network and Microsoft’s Xbox Live network. On Thursday, it also boasted of an attack on Google’s Vietnamese website.

Lenovo said it had taken its website down and was also investigating “other aspects” of the attack.

Later on Thursday morning, visitors to lenovo.com on Thursday morning received a message stating: “The Lenovo site you are attempting to access is currently unavailable due to system maintenance.” It was restored on Thursday afternoon.

Last week, Lenovo acknowledged that its consumer division had sold laptops pre-installed with controversial advertising software called Superfish that potentially left its computers open to being hacked. It said it had stopped installing Superfish on new units in January and disabled the software on existing machines.

Computer experts had warned of a security hole in the software that hackers could exploit to eavesdrop on a user’s web-browsing behaviour.

 


Lenovo admits to software vulnerability – FT.com

Lenovo admits to software vulnerability – FT.com.

 

Last updated: February 19, 2015 7:00 pm

Lenovo admits to software vulnerability

 

Lenovo Group Ltd. signage is displayed near laptops in an arranged photograph at a Lenovo store in the Yuen Long district of Hong Kong, China, on Friday, May 23, 2014. Lenovo, the world's largest maker of personal computers, reported a 25 percent jump in fourth-quarter profit as its desktop models and mobile devices gained global market share. Photographer: Brent Lewin/Bloomberg©Bloomberg

Lenovo, the world’s largest computer manufacturer by unit sales, has been forced to disable controversial software that left users of its laptops vulnerable to hacking attacks.

The software Superfish, which was pre-installed on Lenovo’s devices, was billed as a free “visual search” tool. But Lenovo used it to inject adverts into web pages.

More controversially, however, computer experts have discovered that Superfish contains a major security hole that hackers can potentially exploit to eavesdrop on a user’s web-browsing behaviour.

Users have been raising concerns about Superfish on Lenovo’s own online forums since September, complaining that the software is putting additional advertising into web pages without their permission.

Computer manufacturers often pre-install so-called “adware” into their laptops and PCs in exchange for payment by the software makers, which in turn make money from advertisers.

Lenovo said its customers were given a choice about whether to use the product.

However, Graham Cluley, an independent security expert, said the way in which Lenovo had installed the adware was “cack-handed, and could be exploited by a malicious hacker to intercept the traffic of innocent parties”.

While there is no evidence that hackers have exploited the vulnerability, Mr Cluley said: “If you have Superfish on your computer you really can’t trust secure connections to sites any more.”

 


Chinese Android phones contain in-built hacker 'backdoor' | Technology | The Guardian

Chinese Android phones contain in-built hacker ‘backdoor’ | Technology | The Guardian.

Coolpad
 Smartphones from Chinese manufacturer Coolpad found to have malware pre-installed. Photograph: Coolpad

Smartphones from a major Chinese manufacturer have a security flaw that was deliberately introduced and allows hackers full control of the device.

The “CoolReaper” backdoor was found in the software that powers at least 24 models made by Coolpad, which is now the world’s sixth-biggest smartphone producer according to Canalys.

The flaw allows hackers or Coolpad itself to download and install any software onto the phones without the user’s permission.

“The operator can simply uninstall or disable all security applications in user devices, install additional malware, steal information and inject content into the users device in multiple ways,” according to a report on the malware by security firm Palo Alto Networks (Pan).


Operation Socialist: How GCHQ Spies Hacked Belgium’s Largest Telco

Operation Socialist: How GCHQ Spies Hacked Belgium’s Largest Telco.

BY RYAN GALLAGHER 

When the incoming emails stopped arriving, it seemed innocuous at first. But it would eventually become clear that this was no routine technical problem. Inside a row of gray office buildings in Brussels, a major hacking attack was in progress. And the perpetrators were British government spies.

It was in the summer of 2012 that the anomalies were initially detected by employees at Belgium’s largest telecommunications provider, Belgacom. But it wasn’t until a year later, in June 2013, that the company’s security experts were able to figure out what was going on. The computer systems of Belgacom had been infected with a highly sophisticated malware, and it was disguising itself as legitimate Microsoft software while quietly stealing data.

Last year, documents from National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden confirmed that British surveillance agency Government Communications Headquarters was behind the attack, codenamed Operation Socialist. And in November, The Intercept revealed that the malware found on Belgacom’s systems was one of the most advanced spy tools ever identified by security researchers, who named it “Regin.”

The full story about GCHQ’s infiltration of Belgacom, however, has never been told. Key details about the attack have remained shrouded in mystery—and the scope of the attack unclear.

Now, in partnership with Dutch and Belgian newspapers NRC Handelsbladand De StandaardThe Intercept has pieced together the first full reconstruction of events that took place before, during, and after the secret GCHQ hacking operation.

Based on new documents from the Snowden archive and interviews with sources familiar with the malware investigation at Belgacom’s networks,The Intercept and its partners have established that the attack on Belgacom was more aggressive and far-reaching than previously thought. It occurred in stages between 2010 and 2011, each time penetrating deeper into Belgacom’s systems, eventually compromising the very core of the company’s networks.


México y Bahréin comparten equipo de espionaje informático

México y Bahréin comparten equipo de espionaje informático.

Espionaje político en la UE. Foto: AP
Espionaje político en la UE.
Foto: AP

BRUSELAS (apro).- El mismo equipo de espionaje informático que adquirió el gobierno del presidente Felipe Calderón, y que ha continuado en servicio bajo el gobierno de Enrique Peña Nieto, lo ha utilizado el régimen autoritario de Bahréin para intervenir las computadoras de activistas de derechos humanos, abogados y periodistas opositores.

Se trata del programa espía FinFisher, o FinSpy, que produce la compañía británica Gamma International y que vende sólo a instituciones gubernamentales para, supuestamente, perseguir criminales y terroristas.

Tal empresa enfrenta una queja ante la Organización para la Cooperación y el Desarrollo Económico (OCDE) –a la cual pertenece México—que interpuso en febrero de 2013 un grupo de organizaciones de derechos humanos basadas en Gran Bretaña. Encabezadas por Privacy International, acusan a Gamma International por violar las directrices corporativas de ese organismo en materia de derechos humanos al exportar su programa espía a Bahréin para vigilar a la oposición.


Puertas traseras que recuerdan a la NSA en 600 millones de dispositivos iOS

Puertas traseras que recuerdan a la NSA en 600 millones de dispositivos iOS.

Ciertos servicios de iOS, sobre todo en la versión 7 del sistema, permitirían el establecimiento de puertas traseras

A pesar de que hay una similitud con herramientas de la NSA, Apple defiende que estos servicios descubiertos en iOS solo obedecen a la necesidad de realizar tareas diagnósticas

600 millones de dispositivos iOS en riesgo

Jonathan Zdziarski, hacker experto en iPhone, conocido como NeverGas en la comunidad iOS, ha descubierto indicios de puertas traseras en los dispositivos iOS. El especialista en seguridad ha buceado en las capacidades disponibles en iOS para obtener datos y ha comprobado que unos 600 millones de dispositivos podrían estar en riesgo, sobre todo los que tienen instalada la versión iOS 7.

Zdziarski ha descubierto una serie de funciones no documentadas de iOS que permiten sortear el cifrado del backup en los dispositivos con el sistema operativo móvil de Apple, lo que permitiría robar datos personales de los usuarios sin introducir sus contraseñas, siempre que se den ciertas circunstancias. El atacante tendría que estar físicamente cerca del dispositivo en el que quiere penetrar, así como estar en la misma red WiFi que la víctima, quien para ello debería tener la conexión WiFi activada.

Las vulnerabilidades se han revelado en una conferencia de hackers en Nueva York y Zdziarski ha publicado las ha publicado en un PDF. El sistema iOS ofrece la posibilidad de proteger los mensajes, documentos, cuentas de email, contraseñas varias y otra información personal mediante el backup de iTunes, que se puede asegurar con un cifrado. Pero en lugar de introducir la contraseña para desbloquear todos estos datos, existe un servicio llamado com.apple.mobile.file_relay, cuyo acceso se puede lograr remotamente o a través de cable USB y permite sortear el cifrado del backup.

Así lo cuenta Zdziarski, quien señala que entre la información que se puede obtener de este modo se encuentra la agenda de contactos, las fotografías, los archivos de audio o los datos del GPS. Además, todas las credenciales de cuentas que se hayan configurado en el dispositivo, como los emails, las redes sociales o iCloud, quedan reveladas. El hacker ha señalado que con esta y otras herramientas se puede recopilar casi la misma información que hay en un backup completo.

También se han descubierto otros dos servicios potencialmente peligrosos, destinados en principio a usos por parte de los usuarios y desarrolladores, pero que pueden convertirse en armas de espionaje. Uno de ellos es com.apple.pcapd, que permitiría a un atacante monitorizar remotamente el tráfico que entra y sale de un dispositivo conectado a una red WiFi. El otro es com.apple.mobile.house_arrest, a través del cual iTunes puede copiar archivos y documentos sensibles procedentes de aplicaciones de terceros como Twitter o Facebook.

Puertas traseras que recuerdan a la NSA

Algunos de estos descubrimientos se parecen a las herramientas de la NSA, en concreto a DROPOUTJEEP, que en los dispositivos iOS permite a la agencia de espionaje estadounidense controlar y monitorizar remotamente todas las funciones de un iPhone. Zdziarski ha admitido que empezó a investigar a raíz de un informe de Der Spiegel sobre cómo la NSA había tomado como objetivo los dispositivos iOS y los sistemas a los que estaban asociados.

Por su parte Apple se ha apresurado a decir que estas puertas traseras no tienen relación alguna con ninguna agencia gubernamental. La compañía ha indicado que solo están orientadas a labores “diagnósticas” y a permitir a los departamentos de IT de las empresas gestionar los terminales de los empleados.

 “No me creo ni por un minuto que estos servicios estén pensados solo para diagnosticar. La información que filtran es de una naturaleza extremadamente personal. No hay notificación al usuario”, ha rebatido en su blog el hacker que descubrió las vulnerabilidades.