Lawsuit Seeks Transparency as Searches of Cellphones and Laptops Skyrocket at Borders

A number of recent cases in the media have revealed instances of U.S. citizens and others being compelled by CBP agents to unlock their devices for search. In some instances, people have claimed to have been physically coerced into complying, including one American citizen who said that CBP agents grabbed him by the neck in order to take his cellphone out of his possession.

Fuente: Lawsuit Seeks Transparency as Searches of Cellphones and Laptops Skyrocket at Borders


Relator especial de la ONU pide que la privacidad sea una prioridad para los gobiernos del mundo | R3D: Red en Defensa de los Derechos Digitales

“Hay poca o ninguna evidencia para persuadirme de la eficacia o la proporcionalidad de algunas medidas extremadamente intrusivas presentes en las nuevas leyes de privacidad de Francia, Alemania, el Reino Unido y los Estados Unidos”, asegura Cannataci, en un comunicado de la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de Derechos Humanos de la ONU.

Fuente: Relator especial de la ONU pide que la privacidad sea una prioridad para los gobiernos del mundo | R3D: Red en Defensa de los Derechos Digitales


U.K. Parliament Approves Unprecedented New Hacking and Surveillance Powers

Perhaps the most controversial aspect of the new law is that it will give the British government the authority to serve internet service providers with a “data retention notice,” forcing them to record and store for up to 12 months logs showing websites visited by all of their customers. Law enforcement agencies will then be able to obtain access to this data without any court order or warrant. In addition, the new powers will hand police and tax investigators the ability to, with the approval of a government minister, hack into targeted phones and computers.

Fuente: U.K. Parliament Approves Unprecedented New Hacking and Surveillance Powers


Fears raised over Google’s DeepMind deal to use NHS medical data

“DeepMind/Google are getting a free pass for swift and broad access into the NHS, on the back of persuasive but unproven promises of efficiency and innovation,” said Ms Powles. “We do not know——and have no power to find out——what Google and DeepMind are really doing with NHS patient data, nor the extent of Royal Free’s meaningful control over what DeepMind is doing.”

Fuente: Fears raised over Google’s DeepMind deal to use NHS medical data


Commander-In-Chief Donald Trump Will Have Terrifying Powers. Thanks, Obama.

He’ll control an unaccountable drone program, and the prison at Guantanamo Bay. His FBI, including a network of 15,000 paid informants, already has a record of spying on mosques and activists, and his NSA’s surveillance empire is ubiquitous and governed by arcane rules, most of which remain secret. He will inherit bombing campaigns in seven Muslim countries, the de facto ability to declare war unilaterally, and a massive nuclear arsenal — much of which is on hair-trigger alert.

Fuente: Commander-In-Chief Donald Trump Will Have Terrifying Powers. Thanks, Obama.


Derechos Humanos y vigilancia en América Latina, un panorama preocupante | Derechos Digitales

América Latina tiene un triste historial de autoritarismo y gobiernos que han buscado utilizar el aparato estatal para controlar a sus ciudadanos. Más preocupante que esta constatación es el hecho de que, pasadas varias décadas del período dictatorial de nuestro continente, los gobiernos latinoamericanos parecen empecinados en retroceder, en vez de avanzar, en estándares de Derechos Humanos en temas de vigilancia y privacidad.

Fuente: Derechos Humanos y vigilancia en América Latina, un panorama preocupante | Derechos Digitales


Half of US adults are recorded in police facial recognition databases, study says | World news | The Guardian

More than 117 million adults included in ‘virtual, perpetual lineup’, which authorities can use to track citizens, raising concerns over privacy and profiling

Fuente: Half of US adults are recorded in police facial recognition databases, study says | World news | The Guardian


Santiago, Smart City: en defensa de las ciudades estúpidas | Oficina Antivigilância

Nadie quiere vivir en una ciudad tonta. La idea de marketing detrás de las Smart Cities -así, en inglés, porque le da un toque de modernidad a lo Silicon Valley- es, en ese sentido, impecable. Pero ¿podemos si quiera considerar a una ciudad como estúpida? Al parecer, para los evangelistas de las ciudades inteligentes, y siguiendo la lógica de los pares binarios (bueno/malo; inteligente/tonto), sí.

Fuente: Santiago, Smart City: en defensa de las ciudades estúpidas | Oficina Antivigilância


Bulk data collection vital to prevent terrorism in UK, report finds | World news | The Guardian

The bulk collection of personal data by British spy agencies is vital in preventing terrorist attacks, an independent review of draft security legislation has found.David Anderson QC, the independent reviewer of terrorism legislation, concluded that laws giving MI5, MI6 and GCHQ the right to gather large volumes of data from members of the public had a “clear operational purpose”.

Fuente: Bulk data collection vital to prevent terrorism in UK, report finds | World news | The Guardian


Regulators use Silicon Valley’s AI to catch rogue traders – FT.com

As markets increasingly rely on computer algorithms, reality is imitating fiction: artificial intelligence is becoming a bigger part of investing and it is also helping regulators ensure that traders do not get away with bad behaviour.

Fuente: Regulators use Silicon Valley’s AI to catch rogue traders – FT.com


Secret Text in Senate Bill Would Give FBI Warrantless Access to Email Records

A provision snuck into the still-secret text of the Senate’s annual intelligence authorization would give the FBI the ability to demand individuals’ email data and possibly web-surfing history from their service providers without a warrant and in complete secrecy.

Fuente: Secret Text in Senate Bill Would Give FBI Warrantless Access to Email Records


China’s scary lesson to the world: Censoring the Internet works – The Washington Post

BEHIND THE FIREWALL: How China tamed the Internet | This is part of a series examining the impact of China’s Great Firewall, a mechanism of Internet censorship and surveillance that affects nearly 700 million users.

Fuente: China’s scary lesson to the world: Censoring the Internet works – The Washington Post


Brazilian Cybercrime Bills Threaten Open Internet for 200 Million People

Brazilian internet freedom activists are nervous. On Wednesday, a committee in the lower house of Congress, the Câmera dos Deputados, will vote on seven proposals ostensibly created to combat cybercrime. Critics argue the combined effect will be to substantially restrict open internet in the country by peeling back the right to anonymity, and providing law enforcement with draconian powers to censor online discourse and examine citizens’ personal data without judicial oversight.The bills are ripped straight from what has become a standard international playbook: Propose legislation to combat cybercrime; invoke child pornography, hackers, organized crime, and even terrorism; then slip in measures that also make it easier to identify critical voices online (often without judicial oversight) and either mute them or throw them in jail for defamation — direct threats to free speech.

Fuente: Brazilian Cybercrime Bills Threaten Open Internet for 200 Million People


Microsoft demanda al gobierno de EE.UU. por solicitudes de datos de usuarios – FayerWayer

La compañía acusa al Departamento de Justicia de prohibirles el derecho a informar a sus clientes de saber que están recopilando su información, un requerimiento que sería inconstitucional.

Fuente: Microsoft demanda al gobierno de EE.UU. por solicitudes de datos de usuarios – FayerWayer


Microsoft Says U.S. Is Abusing Secret Warrants

“WE APPRECIATE THAT there are times when secrecy around a government warrant is needed,” Microsoft President Brad Smith wrote in a blog post on Thursday. “But based on the many secrecy orders we have received, we question whether these orders are grounded in specific facts that truly demand secrecy. To the contrary, it appears that the issuance of secrecy orders has become too routine.”With those words, Smith announced that Microsoft was suing the Department of Justice for the right to inform its customers when the government is reading their emails.

Fuente: Microsoft Says U.S. Is Abusing Secret Warrants


Surprise! NSA data will soon routinely be used for domestic policing that has nothing to do with terrorism – The Washington Post

A while back, we noted a report showing that the “sneak-and-peek” provision of the Patriot Act that was alleged to be used only in national security and terrorism investigations has overwhelmingly been used in narcotics cases. Now the New York Times reports that National Security Agency data will be shared with other intelligence agencies like the FBI without first applying any screens for privacy.

Fuente: Surprise! NSA data will soon routinely be used for domestic policing that has nothing to do with terrorism – The Washington Post


Obama Wants Nonexistent Middle Ground on Encryption, Warns Against “Fetishizing Our Phones”

Obama’s first extended disquisition on the contentious issue of encryption suggests he’s only been listening to one side.

Fuente: Obama Wants Nonexistent Middle Ground on Encryption, Warns Against “Fetishizing Our Phones”


Paraguay y Uruguay en polémica por adquirir software espía

Paraguay y Uruguay están inmersos en la polémica tras haber adquirido distintos software avanzados para intervenir comunicaciones como parte de su estrategia nacional de seguridad, un tema que se debate entre la defensa de la privacidad de los ciudadanos y las tácticas para identificar a posibles cibercriminales. Lo anterior pone en duda ¿hasta dónde es válida la vigilancia de comunicaciones privadas por parte de los Estados?

Fuente: Paraguay y Uruguay en polémica por adquirir software espía


¿Qué sigue con la Ley Telecom? – Derechos Digitales

México tiene una de las regulaciones menos garantistas de derechos humanos en la región en cuanto a vigilancia de comunicaciones: sin orden judicial, obliga a las empresas de telefonía a entregar información a todo tipo de autoridades, forzando la retención de datos y la localización geográfica en tiempo real. El proceso por anular esas reglas parece acercarse a su fin.

Fuente: ¿Qué sigue con la Ley Telecom? – Derechos Digitales


US warns of risks from deeper encryption – FT.com

US warns of risks from deeper encryption – FT.com.

 

Jeh Johnson©Getty

Jeh Johnson

The head of the US Department of Homeland Security has warned the cyber security industry that encryption poses “real challenges” for law enforcement.

In a speech at a cyber security conference, RSA in San Francisco, Jeh Johnson called on the industry to find a solution that protected “the basic physical security of the American people” and the “liberties and freedoms we cherish”.

“The current course on deeper and deeper encryption is one that presents real challenges for those in law enforcement and national security,” he said.He said he understood the importance of encryption for privacy but asked the audience to imagine what it would have meant for law enforcement if, after the invention of the telephone, all the police could search was people’s letters.

Mr Johnson’s comments echo those of FBI director James Comey who called on Congress last year to stop the rise of encryption where no one held a key and so law enforcement agencies could not unlock it.

In the UK, the director of GCHQ criticised US technology companies last year for becoming “the command and control networks of choice” for terrorists by protecting communications. Across Europe, police forces have become concerned by their inability to track the communications of people who plan to travel to the Middle East to join the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (Isis).

 


DEA sued over secret bulk collection of Americans' phone records | US news | The Guardian

DEA sued over secret bulk collection of Americans’ phone records | US news | The Guardian.

US phone data Human Rights Watch alleges that the bulk surveillance puts its work in jeopardy. Photograph: Felix Clay

Human rights campaigners have prepared a federal lawsuit aiming to permanently shut down the bulk collection of billions of US phone records – not, this time, by the National Security Agency, but by the Drug Enforcement Agency.

Human Rights Watch, represented by the Electronic Frontier Foundation, filed their lawsuit in Los Angeles federal court on Wednesday morning to stop the DEA from hoovering up billions of records of Americans’ international calls without a warrant.

The reach of the program, exposed by USA Today, lasted for two decades and served as a template for the NSA’s gigantic and ongoing bulk surveillance of US phone data after 9/11.

Though US officials insist the DEA is now out of the bulk-collection business, the revelation of mass phone-records collection in the so-called “war on drugs” raises new questions about whether the Obama administration or its successors believe US security agencies continue to have legal leeway for warrantless bulk surveillance on American citizens, even as officials forswear those powers publicly.


How Big Business Is Helping Expand NSA Surveillance, Snowden Be Damned – The Intercept

How Big Business Is Helping Expand NSA Surveillance, Snowden Be Damned – The Intercept.

Featured photo - How Big Business Is Helping Expand NSA Surveillance, Snowden Be Damned

Since November 11, 2011, with the introduction of the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, American spy agencies have been pushing laws to encourage corporations to share more customer information. They repeatedly failed, thanks in part to NSA contractor Edward Snowden’s revelations of mass government surveillance. Then came Republican victories in last year’s midterm Congressional elections and a major push by corporate interests in favor of the legislation.

Today, the bill is back, largely unchanged, and if congressional insiders and the bill’s sponsors are to believed, the legislation could end up on President Obama’s desk as soon as this month. In another boon to the legislation, Obama is expected to reverse his past opposition and sign it, albeit in an amended and renamed form (CISPA is now CISA, the “Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act”). The reversal comes in the wake of high-profile hacks on JPMorgan Chase and Sony Pictures Entertainment. The bill has also benefitted greatly from lobbying by big business, which sees it as a way to cut costs and to shift some anti-hacking defenses onto the government.

For all its appeal to corporations, CISA represents a major new privacy threat to individual citizens. It lays the groundwork for corporations to feed massive amounts of communications to private consortiums and the federal government, a scale of cooperation even greater than that revealed by Snowden. The law also breaks new ground in suppressing pushback against privacy invasions; in exchange for channeling data to the government, businesses are granted broad legal immunity from privacy lawsuits — potentially leaving consumers without protection if companies break privacy promises that would otherwise keep information out of the hands of authorities.

Ostensibly, CISA is supposed to help businesses guard against cyberattacks by sharing information on threats with one another and with the government. Attempts must be made to filter personal information out of the pool of data that is shared. But the legislation — at least as marked up by the Senate Intelligence Committee — provides an expansive definition of what can be construed as a cybersecurity threat, including any information for responding to or mitigating “an imminent threat of death, serious bodily harm, or serious economic harm,” or information that is potentially related to threats relating to weapons of mass destruction, threats to minors, identity theft, espionage, protection of trade secrets, and other possible offenses. Asked at a hearing in February how quickly such information could be shared with the FBI, CIA, or NSA, Deputy Undersecretary for Cybersecurity Phyllis Schneck replied, “fractions of a second.”

Questions persist on how to more narrowly define a cybersecurity threat, what type of personal data is shared, and which government agencies would retain and store this data. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., who cast the lone dissenting vote against CISA on the Senate Intelligence Committee, declared the legislation “a surveillance bill by another name.” Privacy advocates agree. “The lack of use limitations creates yet another loophole for law enforcement to conduct backdoor searches on Americans,” argues aletter sent by a coalition of privacy organizations, including Free Press Action Fund and New America’s Open Technology Institute. Critics also argue that CISA would not have prevented the recent spate of high-profile hacking incidents. As the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Mark Jaycox noted in a blog post, the JPMorgan hack occurred because of an “un-updated server” and prevailing evidence about the Sony breach is “increasingly pointing to an inside job.”

But the intelligence community and corporate America have this year unified behind the bill. For a look into the breadth of the corporate advocacy campaign to pass CISA, see this letter cosigned by many of the most powerful corporate interests in America and sent to legislators earlier this year. Or another letter, reported in the Wall Street Journal, signed by “general counsels of more than 30 different firms, including 3M and Lockheed Martin Corp.”


Diputados rechaza proyecto pyrawebs alegando inconstitucionalidad

Diputados rechaza proyecto pyrawebs alegando inconstitucionalidad.

Diputados rechaza proyecto pyrawebs alegando inconstitucionalidad

El proyecto debe retornar a la Cámara de Senadores. | Foto: www.siliconweek.es

La Cámara de Diputados rechazó el proyecto conocido como “pyrawebs” que obliga a los prestadores de Internet a almacenar los datos de conexión de los usuarios. Argumentaron violaciones de los derechos humanos garantizados en la Constitución Nacional.


La CIA intenta hace años descifrar los aparatos Apple – BioBioChile

La CIA intenta hace años descifrar los aparatos Apple – BioBioChile.


AFP Photo

AFP Photo

Publicado por Eduardo Woo | La Información es de Agencia AFP
La CIA trabaja desde hace años en descifrar la encriptación de los aparatos Apple a fin de poder espiar las comunicaciones realizadas desde los iPhones y iPads, afirma una investigación publicada el martes por un diario estadounidense.

The Intercept, diario en línea dirigido por Glenn Greenwald, se sustenta en documentos secretos develados por Edward Snowden para afirmar que la Agencia Central de Inteligencia (CIA) intenta desde 2006, es decir un año antes del lanzamiento del iPhone, penetrar las claves cifradas de los aparatos Apple.


Technology should be used to create social mobility – not to spy on citizens | Technology | The Guardian

Technology should be used to create social mobility – not to spy on citizens | Technology | The Guardian.

GCHQPrivate eyes are watching you: the British government communications headquarters (GCHQ) is monitoring the communications of millions of people. Photograph: GCHQ / British Ministry of Defence/EPA

Why spy? That’s the several-million pound question, in the wake of the Snowden revelations. Why would the US continue to wiretap its entire population, given that the only “terrorism” they caught with it was a single attempt to send a small amount of money to Al Shabab?

One obvious answer is: because they can. Spying is cheap, and cheaper every day. Many people have compared NSA/GCHQ mass spying to the surveillance programme of East Germany’s notorious Stasi, but the differences between the NSA and the Stasi are more interesting than the similarities.

The most important difference is size. The Stasi employed one snitch for every 50 or 60 people it watched. We can’t be sure of the size of the entire Five Eyes global surveillance workforce, but there are only about 1.4 million Americans with Top Secret clearance, and many of them don’t work at or for the NSA, which means that the number is smaller than that (the other Five Eyes states have much smaller workforces than the US). This million-ish person workforce keeps six or seven billion people under surveillance – a ratio approaching 1:10,000. What’s more, the US has only (“only”!) quadrupled its surveillance budget since the end of the Cold War: tooling up to give the spies their toys wasn’t all that expensive, compared to the number of lives that gear lets them pry into.

IT has been responsible for a 2-3 order of magnitude productivity gain in surveillance efficiency. The Stasi used an army to surveil a nation; the NSA uses a battalion to surveil a planet.

Spying, especially domestic spying, is an aspect of what the Santa Fe Institute economist Samuel Bowles calls guard labour: work that is done to stabilise property relationships, especially the property belonging to the rich.

The amount a state needs to expend on guard labour is a function of how much legitimacy the state holds in its population’s reckoning. A state whose population mainly views the system as fair needs to do less coercion to attain stability. People who believe that they are well-served by the status quo will not work to upset it. States whose populations view the system as illegitimate need to spend more on guard labour.


CIA 'tried to crack security of Apple devices' | Technology | The Guardian

CIA ‘tried to crack security of Apple devices’ | Technology | The Guardian.

 

The Apple logoThe revelations, published by the Intercept online news organisation, are likely to further strain the relationship between Apple and the US government. Photograph: Yuya Shino/Reuters

The CIA led sophisticated intelligence agency efforts to undermine the encryption used in Apple phones, as well as insert secret surveillance back doors into apps, top-secret documents published by the Intercept online news site have revealed.

The newly disclosed documents from the National Security Agency’s internal systems show surveillance methods were presented at its secret annual conference, known as the “jamboree”.

The most serious of the various attacks disclosed at the event was the creation of a dummy version of Apple’s development software Xcode, which is used by developers to create apps for iOS devices.

The modified version of Xcode would allow the CIA, NSA or other agencies to insert surveillance backdoors into any app created using the compromised development software. The revelation has already provoked a strong backlash among security researchers on Twitter and elsewhere, and is likely to prompt security audits among Apple developers.

The latest revelations of sustained hacking efforts against Apple devices are set to further strain already difficult relations between the technology company and the US government.

Apple had previously been a partner in the Prism programme, in effect a legal backdoor to obtain user information by the NSA and its allies, but in the wake of the Snowden revelations it has stepped up efforts to protect user privacy, including introducing end-to-end encryption on iMessages.


iSpy: The CIA Campaign to Steal Apple's Secrets

iSpy: The CIA Campaign to Steal Apple’s Secrets.

 

 

RESEARCHERS WORKING with the Central Intelligence Agency have conducted a multi-year, sustained effort to break the security of Apple’s iPhones and iPads, according to top-secret documents obtained by The Intercept.

 

The security researchers presented their latest tactics and achievements at a secret annual gathering, called the “Jamboree,” where attendees discussed strategies for exploiting security flaws in household and commercial electronics. The conferences have spanned nearly a decade, with the first CIA-sponsored meeting taking place a year before the first iPhone was released.

 

By targeting essential security keys used to encrypt data stored on Apple’s devices, the researchers have sought to thwart the company’s attempts to provide mobile security to hundreds of millions of Apple customers across the globe. Studying both “physical” and “non-invasive” techniques, U.S. government-sponsored research has been aimed at discovering ways to decrypt and ultimately penetrate Apple’s encrypted firmware. This could enable spies to plant malicious code on Apple devices and seek out potential vulnerabilities in other parts of the iPhone and iPad currently masked by encryption.


Apple and Google 'FREAK attack' leaves millions of users vulnerable to hackers | Technology | The Guardian

Apple and Google ‘FREAK attack’ leaves millions of users vulnerable to hackers | Technology | The Guardian.

The Apple logo inside an Apple store in Tokyo. The company is working to fix a potential security issue which could leave devices vulnerable to hackers. The Apple logo inside an Apple store in Tokyo. The company is working to fix a potential security issue which could leave devices vulnerable to hackers. Photograph: Yuya Shino/Reuters

Millions of people may have been left vulnerable to hackers while surfing the web on Apple and Google devices, thanks to a newly discovered security flaw known as “FREAK attack.”

There’s no evidence so far that any hackers have exploited the weakness, which companies are now moving to repair. Researchers blame the problem on an old government policy, abandoned over a decade ago, which required US software makers to use weaker security in encryption programs sold overseas due to national security concerns.

Many popular websites and some internet browsers continued to accept the weaker software, or can be tricked into using it, according to experts at several research institutions who reported their findings Tuesday.

They said that could make it easier for hackers to break the encryption that’s supposed to prevent digital eavesdropping when a visitor types sensitive information into a website.

About a third of all encrypted websites were vulnerable as of Tuesday, including sites operated by American Express, Groupon, Kohl’s, Marriott and some government agencies, the researchers said.


Memex, el buscador de DARPA que rastrea la Deep Web

Memex, el buscador de DARPA que rastrea la Deep Web.

La Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA), que depende del Gobierno de EEUU, ha creado un buscador capaz de bucear en las profundidades de la Deep Web

Algunas autoridades estadounidenses ya están usando Memex para investigar delitos relativos al tráfico de personas

Iceberg - Wikipedia http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Iceberg_-_NOAA.jpg

Si internet fuera un iceberg, la Deep Web sería la parte oculta: se calcula que es mucho mayor que la Web visible

El término proviene de un artículo de 1945, publicado durante las últimas semanas de la II Guerra Mundial por el ingeniero y director de la U.S Office of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD) Vannevar Bush. En él se describía Memex como una especie de invento electromecánico capaz de almacenar todos los libros, grabaciones y todo tipo de información con el fin de poder rescatarla a placer.

El ingenio no fue desarrollado, claro está, y hoy lo más parecido que hay son los buscadores de Internet. Pero estos se dejan una parte sustancial de la Red sin acceder, la Deep Web, que en 2013 saltó a los titulares de los medios por el caso Silk Road. La agencia gubernamental estadounidense DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Project Agency) ha desarrollado un buscador que puede llegar a todos estos sitios donde no llegan Google, Yahoo o Bing. Lo han llamado Memex.

Aunque en principio la idea de DARPA es que Memex también pueda usarse en el ámbito comercial, lo que significaría que cualquier usuario podría utilizarlo, por el momento son las autoridades estadounidenses las que operan con él. Desde enero de 2014 sirve para las investigaciones sobre tráfico de personas que lleva a cabo el fiscal del distrito de Manhattan.


La reforma de la NSA se queda a medio camino un año después | Internacional | EL PAÍS

La reforma de la NSA se queda a medio camino un año después | Internacional | EL PAÍS.


Algunos de los cambios anunciados por Obama no se han materializado

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Centro de datos de la NSA, en Utah. / RICK BOWMER (AP)

El teléfono de J. Kirk Wiebe suena desde hace unos meses con menos frecuencia. Wiebe fue uno de los primeros filtradores de la Agencia Nacional de Seguridad. Tras jubilarse en 2001, denunció, junto a dos veteranos exanalistas, que la NSA tenía cada vez más acceso a datos personales. Lograron poca atención y fueron perseguidos en la justicia. Pero en junio de 2013, adquirieron notoriedad gracias a las revelaciones deEdward Snowden sobre los largos tentáculos de la NSA: empezaron a dar muchas más charlas en Estados Unidos y Europa sobre su experiencia e influencia.

“Snowden nos había visto diciendo que intentamos ir por los canales internos del Gobierno y no conseguimos nada”, subraya Wiebe en alusión a que, tras fracasar ellos, Snowden optase por filtrar secretos a la prensa en vez de formular una queja interna en la NSA.

Pero ahora, al año y medio de las filtraciones de Snowden y al año de anunciarse la reforma de los programas de vigilancia, se habla mucho menos del joven exanalista refugiado en Rusia y del espionaje masivo. “La excitación ha bajado un poco, pero a la gente sigue sin gustarle [la NSA]”, agrega en una entrevista telefónica Wiebe, de 70 años, 30 de ellos en la agencia. La percepción pública sobre la NSA apenas ha variado: en octubre de 2013, un 54% tenía una opinión favorable; en enero de este año, un 51% (sobre todo jóvenes), según una encuesta del centro Pew.

Al año y medio de las filtraciones de Snowden y al año de anunciarse la reforma de los programas de vigilancia, se habla mucho menos del joven exanalista refugiado en Rusia y del espionaje masivo

Sin embargo, buena parte del debate en EE UU sobre los límites de la recopilación masiva de datos ha quedado eclipsado. El contexto ha cambiado, lo que puede propiciar retrocesos: crecen las voces que, ante el auge del yihadismo, se oponen a restringir los programas de vigilancia, y reclaman que las autoridades tengan plenos poderes para desbloquear la encriptación de teléfonos móviles.

La reforma de la NSA se ha quedado, por ahora, a medio camino. En enero de 2014, el presidente de EE UU, Barack Obama, anunció un conjunto de cambios para limitar la interceptación de datos sin mermar la protección de la seguridad nacional. Su objetivo era atenuar las preocupaciones de ciudadanos estadounidenses y gobiernos extranjeros aliados sobre posibles injerencias a la privacidad.


Cybercriminals ‘often start out with minor thefts in online games’ | Technology | The Guardian

Cybercriminals ‘often start out with minor thefts in online games’ | Technology | The Guardian.

A screengrab from World of Warcraft


 World Of Warcraft is an online role-playing game which can feature thousands of players from around the world interacting with each other in a virtual universe. Photograph: World of Warcraft screenshot

People who go on to commit serious cybercrime often start out with minor thefts in online games such as World Of Warcraft, a leading detective has said.

Looking at how people end up on a particular criminal path could help with early intervention, said Dr Jamie Saunders of the National Crime Agency.

In an interview with the Independent, the director of the National Cyber Crime Unit said cybercriminals can do “a great deal of damage, but not in a traditional criminal way”, and explained that the crimes can start out on a small scale.


Ex-MI6 chief calls for new compact between internet firms and spy agencies | UK news | The Guardian

Ex-MI6 chief calls for new compact between internet firms and spy agencies | UK news | The Guardian.

Sir John Sawers says Snowden revelations shattered informal relationship but cooperation is necessary to prevent attacks

 

 

Former MI6 chief Sir John Sawers
Sir John Sawers said it was impossible to monitor terrorist activities without intruding upon the lives of others. Photograph: Elyse Marks/Edelman/PA

 

The former head of MI6, Sir John Sawers, has called for a new surveillance compact between internet companies and the security services in the UK and US in the wake of the Snowden revelations.

 

In his first speech since standing down as “C” at the end of last year, Sawers said the two could work together as they had in the past to prevent a repeat of events such as the Charlie Hebdo attack, the always present threats from militant Islamists in places such as Yemen, and the advance of Boko Haram in Nigeria.

 

In other parts of the speech, he aligned himself with Pope Francis in calling for restraint in offending the religious sensitivities of others after the Paris attack. He also, surprisingly, distanced MI6 from the CIA over what he called “lethal” operations.

 

Sawers, who is going into the private sector after decades in the Foreign Office and latterly at MI6, said the Snowden revelations in 2013 had shattered the previous informal relationship between tech companies and the surveillance agencies.

 

Companies such as Google and Microsoft had suffered a consumer backlash as a result of the revelations and are increasingly unwilling to cooperate to the same degree, creating a headache for the surveillance agencies in the US and the UK.


Latest FBI Claim of Disrupted Terror Plot Deserves Much Scrutiny and Skepticism – The Intercept

Latest FBI Claim of Disrupted Terror Plot Deserves Much Scrutiny and Skepticism – The Intercept.

BY GLENN GREENWALD AND ANDREW FISHMAN 

Featured photo - Latest FBI Claim of Disrupted Terror Plot Deserves Much Scrutiny and Skepticism

The Justice Department on Wednesday issued a press release trumpeting its latest success in disrupting a domestic terrorism plot, announcing that “the Joint Terrorism Task Force has arrested a Cincinnati-area man for a plot to attack the U.S. Capitol and kill government officials.” The alleged would-be terrorist is 20-year-old Christopher Cornell (above), who is unemployed, lives at home, spends most of his time playing video games in his bedroom, still addresses his mother as “Mommy” and regards his cat as his best friend; he was described as “a typical student” and “quiet but not overly reserved” by the principal of the local high school he graduated in 2012.

The affidavit filed by an FBI investigative agent alleges Cornell had “posted comments and information supportive of [ISIS] through Twitter accounts.” The FBI learned about Cornell from an unnamed informant who, as the FBI put it, “began cooperating with the FBI in order to obtain favorable treatment with respect to his criminal exposure on an unrelated case.” Acting under the FBI’s direction, the informant arranged two in-person meetings with Cornell where they allegedly discussed an attack on the Capitol, and the FBI says it arrested Cornell to prevent him from carrying out the attack.

Family members say Cornell converted to Islam just six months ago and claimed he began attending a small local mosque. Yet The Cincinnati Enquirer could not find a single person at that mosque who had ever seen him before, and noted that a young, white, recent convert would have been quite conspicuous at a mosque largely populated by “immigrants from West Africa,” many of whom “speak little or no English.”

The DOJ’s press release predictably generated an avalanche of scary media headlines hailing the FBI. CNN: “FBI says plot to attack U.S. Capitol was ready to go.” MSNBC: “US terror plot foiled by FBI arrest of Ohio man.” Wall St. Journal: “Ohio Man Charged With Plotting ISIS-Inspired Attack on U.S. Capitol.”

Just as predictably, political officials instantly exploited the news to justify their powers of domestic surveillance. House Speaker John Boehner claimed yesterday that “the National Security Agency’s snooping powers helped stop a plot to attack the Capitol and that his colleagues need to keep that in mind as they debate whether to renew the law that allows the government to collect bulk information from its citizens.” He warned: “We live in a dangerous country, and we get reminded every week of the dangers that are out there.” 


Barack Obama and David Cameron fail to see eye to eye on surveillance | US news | The Guardian

Barack Obama and David Cameron fail to see eye to eye on surveillance | US news | The Guardian.


British prime minister takes tougher line on internet companies than US president at White House talks on Islamist threats

In Washington, David Cameron announces the creation of a joint group between the US and the UK to counter the rise of domestic violent extremism in the two countries

Barack Obama and David Cameron struck different notes on surveillance powers after the president conceded that there is an important balance to be struck between monitoring terror suspects and protecting civil liberties.

As Cameron warned the internet giants that they must do more to ensure they do not become platforms for terrorist communications, the US president said he welcomed the way in which civil liberties groups hold them to account by tapping them on the shoulder.

Obama agreed with the prime minister that there could be no spaces on the internet for terrorists to communicate that could not be monitored by the intelligences agencies, subject to proper oversight. But, unlike Cameron, the president encouraged groups to ensure that he and other leaders do not abandon civil liberties.

The prime minister adopted a harder stance on the need for big internet companies such as Facebook and Twitter to do more to cooperate with the surveillance of terror suspects. In an interview with Channel 4 News he said they had to be careful not to act as a communications platform for terrorists.