Periodista noruego que investiga caso SQM: “Se ha creado un sistema donde es imposible competir en política sin el apoyo de la elite empresarial” – El Mostrador

Hoy no hay un conflicto en el mundo en el que los cables Wikileaks no tengan algo que decir. Me impactó cuando Assange dijo: “¿Cómo es posible que un puñado de jóvenes con sus computadores hayan descubierto más secretos de la potencia mundial más fuerte del mundo que todo el aparataje de la prensa en su conjunto?”.

Fuente: Periodista noruego que investiga caso SQM: “Se ha creado un sistema donde es imposible competir en política sin el apoyo de la elite empresarial” – El Mostrador


Japan Made Secret Deals With the NSA That Expanded Global Surveillance

The documents, published Monday in collaboration with Japanese news broadcaster NHK, reveal the complicated relationship the NSA has maintained with Japan over a period of more than six decades. Japan has allowed NSA to maintain at least three bases on its territory and contributed more than half a billion dollars to help finance the NSA’s facilities and operations. In return, NSA has kitted out Japanese spies with powerful surveillance tools and shared intelligence with them. However, there is a duplicitous dimension to the partnership. While the NSA has maintained friendly ties with its Japanese counterparts and benefited from their financial generosity, at the same time it has secretly spied on Japanese officials and institutions.

Fuente: Japan Made Secret Deals With the NSA That Expanded Global Surveillance


The Strangers Who Got Snowden’s Secrets in the Mail

The story of Edward Snowden’s disclosure of NSA secrets to the press has been told and retold in books, films, and countless articles. Left unreported has been the quiet role of two journalists who literally had Snowden material mailed to them in a cardboard box.

Fuente: The Strangers Who Got Snowden’s Secrets in the Mail


Apple Says It Fixed CIA Vulnerabilities Years Ago

Yesterday, WikiLeaks released its latest batch of pilfered CIA material, five documents describing malicious software for taking over Apple MacBooks and iPhones, and wrote in an accompanying post that “the CIA has been infecting the iPhone supply chain of its targets,” prompting concerned readers to wonder if their iPhone or MacBook had been infected on the factory floor. In a statement, Apple says that is almost certainly not the case.

Fuente: Apple Says It Fixed CIA Vulnerabilities Years Ago


Wikileaks filtra nuevos documentos secretos sobre cómo “hackeaba” la CIA cualquier iPhone o Mac – El Mostrador

Bajo el nombre “Dark Matter” Wikileaks publicó una nueva tanda de documentos secretos, en los que detalla varios proyectos de la CIA para lograr infectar y “hackear” cualquier iPhone o Mac.

Fuente: Wikileaks filtra nuevos documentos secretos sobre cómo “hackeaba” la CIA cualquier iPhone o Mac – El Mostrador


Edward Snowden’s leave to remain in Russia extended for three years | US news | The Guardian

Earlier on Wednesday, Maria Zakharova, a foreign ministry spokeswoman, wrote on Facebook that Snowden’s right to stay had recently been extended “by a couple of years”. Her post came in response to a suggestion from the former acting CIA director Michael Morell that Vladimir Putin might hand over Snowden to the US, despite there being no extradition treaty between the countries.

Fuente: Edward Snowden’s leave to remain in Russia extended for three years | US news | The Guardian


State of surveillance: privacy in Donald Trump’s America – tech podcast | Technology | The Guardian

With Barack Obama’s presidency coming to a close, Ewen MacAskill, the Guardian’s defence and intelligence correspondent, helps us explore what mass surveillance in America might look like under Donald Trump

Fuente: State of surveillance: privacy in Donald Trump’s America – tech podcast | Technology | The Guardian


Ex-Yahoo Employee: Government Spy Program Could Have Given a Hacker Access to All Email

Contrary to a denial by Yahoo and a report by the New York Times, the company’s scanning program, revealed earlier this week by Reuters, provided the government with a custom-built back door into the company’s mail service — and it was so sloppily installed that it posed a privacy hazard for hundreds of millions of users, according to a former Yahoo employee with knowledge of the company’s security practices.

Fuente: Ex-Yahoo Employee: Government Spy Program Could Have Given a Hacker Access to All Email


NSA Theft Suspect Worked For Contractor That Sells the Government Tech for Spotting Rogue Employees

Booz Allen Hamilton, the defense contracting giant whose employee was charged Wednesday in connection with the theft of hacking codes used by the National Security Agency, provides a fairly ironic service to the government: spotting rogue employees.

Fuente: NSA Theft Suspect Worked For Contractor That Sells the Government Tech for Spotting Rogue Employees


Yahoo email surveillance: who approved the secret scanning program? | Technology | The Guardian

By what legal authority do the National Security Agency and the FBI ask Yahoo to search its users’ emails? Neither the government nor the tech company would say, after Reuters first reported on Tuesday that Yahoo “secretly built a custom software program” it used on behalf of the NSA and CIA to scan customer emails.

Fuente: Yahoo email surveillance: who approved the secret scanning program? | Technology | The Guardian


Yahoo may have let the government spy on emails. Now will we embrace encryption? | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian

Finally, Yahoo’s possible betrayal of its users is another example of why whistleblowers and leaks to the press are so important. The US government considers this type of surveillance “legal” even though it shocks the conscience of many ordinary Americans and dozens of civil liberties groups have been attempting to have courts rule it illegal for years.

Fuente: Yahoo may have let the government spy on emails. Now will we embrace encryption? | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian


Yahoo secretly monitored emails on behalf of the US government – report | Technology | The Guardian

Yahoo last year secretly built a custom software program to search all of its customers’ incoming emails for specific information provided by US intelligence officials, sources have told Reuters.The company complied with a classified US government directive, scanning hundreds of millions of Yahoo Mail accounts at the behest of the National Security Agency (NSA) or FBI, said two former employees and a third person who knew about the programme.

Fuente: Yahoo secretly monitored emails on behalf of the US government – report | Technology | The Guardian


FBI Says Edward Snowden Is Reason Companies Are Resisting Handing Over Phone Records

Companies became more resistant to the FBI’s collection of their customers’ information following revelations by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, according to an inspector general report released Thursday.

Fuente: FBI Says Edward Snowden Is Reason Companies Are Resisting Handing Over Phone Records


Washington Post says Obama should not pardon whistleblower Ed Snowden | Media | The Guardian

Newspaper criticised for calling for the criminal prosecution of its own source, on ‘whose back the paper won and eagerly accepted a Pulitzer Prize’

Fuente: Washington Post says Obama should not pardon whistleblower Ed Snowden | Media | The Guardian


New Film Tells the Story of Edward Snowden; Here Are the Surveillance Programs He Helped Expose

Oliver Stone’s latest film, “Snowden,” bills itself as a dramatized version of the life of Edward Snowden, the NSA whistleblower who revealed the global extent of U.S. surveillance capabilities.

Fuente: New Film Tells the Story of Edward Snowden; Here Are the Surveillance Programs He Helped Expose


‘Edward Snowden did this country a great service. Let him come home’ | US news | The Guardian

Bernie Sanders, Daniel Ellsberg, former members of the NSA and more weigh in on whether Obama should grant clemency to the divisive whistleblower

Fuente: ‘Edward Snowden did this country a great service. Let him come home’ | US news | The Guardian


Edward Snowden makes ‘moral’ case for presidential pardon | US news | The Guardian

Edward Snowden has set out the case for Barack Obama granting him a pardon before the US president leaves office in January, arguing that the disclosure of the scale of surveillance by US and British intelligence agencies was not only morally right but had left citizens better off.

Fuente: Edward Snowden makes ‘moral’ case for presidential pardon | US news | The Guardian


The NSA’s British Base at the Heart of U.S. Targeted Killing

in the heart of the tranquil English countryside, is the National Security Agency’s largest overseas spying base. Originally used to monitor Soviet communications through the Cold War, its focus has since dramatically shifted, and today it is a vital part of the NSA’s sprawling global surveillance network.

Fuente: The NSA’s British Base at the Heart of U.S. Targeted Killing


How the U.S. Spies on Medical Nonprofits and Health Defenses Worldwide

As part of an ongoing effort to “exploit medical intelligence,” the National Security Agency teamed up with the military-focused Defense Intelligence Agency to extract “medical SIGINT” from the intercepted communications of nonprofit groups starting in the early 2000s, a top-secret document shows.

Fuente: How the U.S. Spies on Medical Nonprofits and Health Defenses Worldwide


Se cumple el aniversario de la filtración masiva de datos del Hacking Team | R3D: Red en Defensa de los Derechos Digitales

Hace un año, más de mil 500 correos electrónicos y 400 GB de información de la empresa italiana Hacking Team, dedicada a la venta de software para vigilancia, fueron hechos públicos.

Fuente: Se cumple el aniversario de la filtración masiva de datos del Hacking Team | R3D: Red en Defensa de los Derechos Digitales


Facing Data Deluge, Secret U.K. Spying Report Warned of Intelligence Failure

A secret report warned that British spies may have put lives at risk because their surveillance systems were sweeping up more data than could be analyzed, leading them to miss clues to possible security threats.

Fuente: Facing Data Deluge, Secret U.K. Spying Report Warned of Intelligence Failure


Las escuchas telefónicas ponen en jaque a la política brasileña – El Mostrador

Las escuchas telefónicas han convulsionado los cimientos de la política brasileña y han puesto contra las cuerdas a algunos de sus pupilos por la filtración de conversaciones privadas, como la que hoy derivó en la “licencia” del cargo del ministro de Planificación, Romero Jucá.

Fuente: Las escuchas telefónicas ponen en jaque a la política brasileña – El Mostrador


The Intercept Is Broadening Access to the Snowden Archive. Here’s Why

SIDtoday is the internal newsletter for the NSA’s most important division, the Signals Intelligence Directorate. After editorial review, The Intercept is releasing nine years’ worth of newsletters in batches, starting with 2003. The agency’s spies explain a surprising amount about what they were doing, how they were doing it, and why.

Fuente: The Intercept Is Broadening Access to the Snowden Archive. Here’s Why


The Intercept Is Broadening Access to the Snowden Archive. Here’s Why

From the time we began reporting on the archive provided to us in Hong Kong by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, we sought to fulfill his two principal requests for how the materials should be handled: that they be released in conjunction with careful reporting that puts the documents in context and makes them digestible to the public, and that the welfare and reputations of innocent people be safeguarded. As time has gone on, The Intercept has sought out new ways to get documents from the archive into the hands of the public, consistent with the public interest as originally conceived.Today, The Intercept is announcing two innovations in how we report on and publish these materials. Both measures are designed to ensure that reporting on the archive continues in as expeditious and informative a manner as possible, in accordance with the agreements we entered into with our source about how these materials would be disclosed, a framework that he, and we, have publicly described on numerous occasions.

Fuente: The Intercept Is Broadening Access to the Snowden Archive. Here’s Why


Documents Reveal Secretive U.K. Surveillance Policies

NEWLY DISCLOSED DOCUMENTS offer a rare insight into the secretive legal regime underpinning the British government’s controversial mass surveillance programs.The London-based group Privacy International obtained the previously confidential files as part of an ongoing legal case challenging the scope of British spies’ covert collection of huge troves of private data.

Fuente: Documents Reveal Secretive U.K. Surveillance Policies


El imperio ‘Ilegal’ de Hacking Team en América Latina | Motherboard

A principios de Abril de 2014, un espía del servicio de inteligencia de Ecuador mandó una serie de correos electrónicos al servicio al cliente de Hacking Team, una compañía italiana de hackers pagados que trabaja con agencias gubernamentales alrededor del mundo.

Fuente: El imperio ‘Ilegal’ de Hacking Team en América Latina | Motherboard


El auge del software de vigilancia en América Latina – Derechos Digitales

El software de Hacking Team es contrario a los estándares legales y violatorio de los derechos a la privacidad, a la libertad de expresión y al debido proceso.

Fuente: El auge del software de vigilancia en América Latina – Derechos Digitales


Hacking Team Is Back In Business, But Struggling To Survive | Motherboard

Earlier this year, a representative for the notorious surveillance vendor Hacking Team traveled to South America to pitch the company’s marquee spyware product to a potential new customer.The representative gave a presentation at the office of a government agency, showed off the spyware control center, and handed out some marketing materials.It was an unremarkable sales pitch—affirmed by the fact that the potential client decided not to buy, according to a source who attended the meeting—except for the timing, which was almost six months after what some consider Hacking Team’s near-death experience.

Fuente: Hacking Team Is Back In Business, But Struggling To Survive | Motherboard


La fiscalía alemana investiga si los servicios secretos espiaron para la NSA | Internacional | EL PAÍS

La fiscalía alemana investiga si los servicios secretos espiaron para la NSA | Internacional | EL PAÍS.


Según ‘Spiegel Online’, el BND informó al espionaje de EE UU sobre políticos europeos

chivado en:

Merkel, este viernes en el Bundestag / BRITTA PEDERSEN (EFE)

El polémico y famoso servicio de inteligencia federal de Alemania (BND por sus siglas en alemán) tiene desde el jueves pasado un problema que le puede costar el cargo a su presidente, Gerhard Schindel, y enfrentar a la cancillería a incómodas preguntas que, por el momento, no tienen respuestas. Ese día, Spiegel Online reveló que la Agencia Nacional de Seguridad estadounidense (NSA) ha realizado durante años una exitosa labor de vigilancia y espionaje en Europa gracias a la interesada ayuda de sus colegas alemanas del BND. La fiscalía alemana ya está investigando el caso.

El nuevo escándalo que está causando furor en Berlín se inició cuando los técnicos de la NSA, posiblemente hace 10 años, le entregaron a sus colegas del BND los llamados “selectores”, una herramienta informática que incluye números de teléfonos móviles, direcciones IP de conexiones informáticas y direcciones de correo electrónico, que le permitieron al BND espiar a políticos y empresas europeas. Las informaciones que obtuvieron los espías alemanes fueron entregadas a la NSA.

Según informaciones de la prensa alemana, los agentes del BND encargados de realizar el trabajo sucio para la NSA se percataron en 2008 que los “selectores” estaban diseñados para realizar un trabajo de vigilancia y espionaje que no estaba permitido por las disposiciones legales que regulan el trabajo del servicio alemán, ni tampoco por los acuerdos suscritos entre Berlin y Washington y que regulan la lucha contra el terrorismo internacional. En lugar de informar a la cancillería, el BND siguió colaborando con la NSA.


The government will hide its surveillance programs. But they won't eliminate them | Trevor Timm | Comment is free | The Guardian

The government will hide its surveillance programs. But they won’t eliminate them | Trevor Timm | Comment is free | The Guardian.

 Wnsahen will the government stop listening in to our conversations? Photograph: age fotostock / Alamy/Alamy

Want to see how secrecy is corrosive to democracy? Look no further than a series of explosive investigations by various news organizations this week that show the government hiding surveillance programs purely to prevent a giant public backlash.

USA Today’s Brad Heath published a blockbuster story on Monday about the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) running a massive domestic spying operation parallel to the NSA’s that was tracking billions of international calls made by Americans. They kept it secret for more than two decades. According to the USA Today report, the spying program was not only used against alleged terrorist activity, but countless supposed drug crimes, as well as “to identify US suspects in a wide range of other investigations”. And they collected information on millions of completely innocent Americans along the way.

Heath’s story is awash with incredible detail and should be read in full, but one of the most interesting parts was buried near the end: the program was shut down by the Justice Department after the Snowden leaks, not because Snowden exposed the program, but because they knew that when the program eventually would leak, the government would have no arguments to defend it.

The justification they were using for the NSA’s program – that it was only being used against dangerous terrorists, not ordinary criminals – just wasn’t true with the DEA. The public would clearly be outraged by the twisted legal justification that radically re-interpreted US law in complete secrecy. “They couldn’t defend both programs”, a former Justice Department official told Heath. The piece also reveals that Attorney General Eric “didn’t think we should have that information” in the first place, which is interesting because Holder was one of the first Justice Department officials to approve the program during the Clinton administration. It’s nice he came to his senses, but if the program never risked going public, would he have felt the same?

There are many other surveillance programs the government is desperate to keep hidden. Consider Stingray devices, the mini fake cell phone towers that can vacuum up cell phone data of entire neighborhoods at the same time and which are increasingly being used by local cops all around the country. The Associated Press reported this week that the Baltimore police have used these controversial devices thousands of times in the course of ordinary investigations and have tried to hide how the devices are used from judges.

The lengths to which the FBI will go to keep these devices secret from the public is alarming. As a Guardian investigation detailed on Friday, the FBI makes local police that use them sign non-disclosure agreements, and goes as far as to direct them to dismiss charges against potential criminals if the phone surveillance will be exposed at trial (like is required by due process rights in the Fifth Amendment).


In New Video, Congressman Explains Why His Fellow Lawmakers Couldn't Be Trusted with NSA Oversight – The Intercept

In New Video, Congressman Explains Why His Fellow Lawmakers Couldn’t Be Trusted with NSA Oversight – The Intercept.

Featured photo - In New Video, Congressman Explains Why His Fellow Lawmakers Couldn’t Be Trusted with NSA Oversight

Congressmen who asked about oversight of NSA mass surveillance and domestic spying in 2013 could have “compromise[d] security” and were denied the records they sought because of concerns they lacked formal government security clearance, a former member of the House Intelligence Committee says in a newly-released video.

The footage, from an August 29, 2013 town hall meeting, sheds new light on why lawmakers were denied key rulings and reports from the secret courts overseeing the National Security Agency — even as the Obama administration and intelligence officials claimed that all NSA programs were subject to strict congressional oversight and therefore could be held accountable.

In the video, Rep. Jim Langevin, D-R.I., then a member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, discusses why Rep. Alan Grayson, D-Fla., and Rep. Morgan Griffith, R-Va., should not and did not receive information they sought from the committee. The committee had previously declined to explain why the information was withheld, going so far as to tell Grayson that even its discussion of his request was classified. Because the committee, like its Senate counterpart, tends to be particularly sympathetic to the intelligence community, getting information to non-committee members like Grayson and Griffith is potentially crucial to reforming U.S. spy agencies. And in late 2013, following revelations of mass surveillance by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, there were any number of reform bills pending.


Documents Reveal Canada’s Secret Hacking Tactics – The Intercept

Documents Reveal Canada’s Secret Hacking Tactics – The Intercept.

Featured photo - Documents Reveal Canada’s Secret Hacking Tactics

Canada’s electronic surveillance agency has secretly developed an arsenal of cyber weapons capable of stealing data and destroying adversaries’ infrastructure, according to newly revealed classified documents.

Communications Security Establishment, or CSE, has also covertly hacked into computers across the world to gather intelligence, breaking into networks in Europe, Mexico, the Middle East, and North Africa, the documents show.

The revelations, reported Monday by CBC News in collaboration with The Intercept, shine a light for the first time on how Canada has adopted aggressive tactics to attack, sabotage, and infiltrate targeted computer systems.

The latest disclosures come as the Canadian government debates whether to hand over more powers to its spies to disrupt threats as part of the controversial anti-terrorism law, Bill C-51.

Christopher Parsons, a surveillance expert at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab, told CBC News that the new revelations showed that Canada’s computer networks had already been “turned into a battlefield without any Canadian being asked: Should it be done? How should it be done?”

According to documents obtained by The Intercept from National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden, CSE has a wide range of powerful tools to perform “computer network exploitation” and “computer network attack” operations. These involve hacking into networks to either gather intelligence or to damage adversaries’ infrastructure, potentially including electricity, transportation or banking systems. The most well-known example of a state-sponsored “attack” operation involved the use of Stuxnet, a computer worm that was reportedly developed by the United States and Israel to sabotage Iranian nuclear facilities.


US Threatened Germany Over Snowden, Vice Chancellor Says – The Intercept

US Threatened Germany Over Snowden, Vice Chancellor Says – The Intercept.

Featured photo - US Threatened Germany Over Snowden, Vice Chancellor Says

German Vice Chancellor Sigmar Gabriel (above) said this week in Homburg that the U.S. government threatened to cease sharing intelligence with Germany if Berlin offered asylum to NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden or otherwise arranged for him to travel to that country. “They told us they would stop notifying us of plots and other intelligence matters,” Gabriel said.

The vice chancellor delivered a speech in which he praised the journalists who worked on the Snowden archive, and then lamented the fact that Snowden was forced to seek refuge in “Vladimir Putin’s autocratic Russia” because no other nation was willing and able to protect him from threats of imprisonment by the U.S. government (I was present at the event to receive an award). That prompted an audience member to interrupt his speech and yell out: “Why don’t you bring him to Germany, then?”

There has been a sustained debate in Germany over whether to grant asylum to Snowden, and a major controversy arose last year when a Parliamentary Committee investigating NSA spying divided as to whether to bring Snowden to testify in person, and then narrowly refused at the behest of the Merkel government. In response to the audience interruption, Gabriel claimed that Germany would be legally obligated to extradite Snowden to the U.S. if he were on German soil.

Afterward, however, when I pressed the vice chancellor (who is also head of the Social Democratic Party, as well as the country’s economy and energy minister) as to why the German government could not and would not offer Snowden asylum — which, under international law, negates the asylee’s status as a fugitive — he told me that the U.S. government had aggressively threatened the Germans that if they did so, they would be “cut off” from all intelligence sharing. That would mean, if the threat were carried out, that the Americans would literally allow the German population to remain vulnerable to a brewing attack discovered by the Americans by withholding that information from their government.


Citizenfour: no es ciencia ficción

Citizenfour: no es ciencia ficción.

El documental de Laura Poitras cuenta los primeros momentos de la mayor filtración de espionaje de un Gobierno en la historia

La existencia de un segundo filtrador dentro de la NSA y el reencuentro de Snowden con su pareja en Moscú son las dos revelaciones del documental

La fecha de estreno en España está prevista para el 27 de marzo

Edward Snowden, en una de las imágenes del documental de Laura Poitras, Citizenfour.

Edward Snowden, en una de las imágenes del documental de Laura Poitras, Citizenfour.

La película de Laura Poitras es un documental imprescindible para entender esta nueva etapa de internet. Citizenfour es, primero, un documento histórico que recoge de primerísima mano el encuentro de Edward Snowden con los periodistas que le ayudaron a revelar al mundo el mayor espionaje masivo conocido; y después, una película inquietante, donde es la información y no la música la que nos hace darnos cuenta de que no estamos viendo ciencia ficción.

Como dice Snowden a un absorto Glenn Greenwald tras contarle cómo funciona XKeyscore, un programa de la NSA: “Esto ya está sucediendo”.


How to Leak to The Intercept – The Intercept

How to Leak to The Intercept – The Intercept.

Featured photo - How to Leak to The Intercept

People often tell reporters things their employers, or their government, want to keep suppressed. But leaking can serve the public interest, fueling revelatory and important journalism.

This publication was created in part as a platform for journalism arising from unauthorized disclosures by NSA contractor Edward Snowden. Our founders and editors are strongly committed to publishing stories based on leaked material when that material is newsworthy and serves the public interest. So ever since The Intercept launched, our staff has tried to put the best technology in place to protect our sources. Our website has been protected with HTTPS encryption from the beginning. All of our journalists publish their PGP keys on their staff profiles so that readers can send them encrypted email. And we’ve been running a SecureDrop server, an open source whistleblower submission system, to make it simpler and more secure for anonymous sources to get in touch with us.

But caution is still advised to those who want to communicate with us without exposing their real-world identities.


Nueva documentación de Snowden: La NSA vigila los cambios en servidores de internet

Nueva documentación de Snowden: La NSA vigila los cambios en servidores de internet.


E-mail
Escrito por Pablo Elorduy / Diagonal
Jueves, 29 de Enero de 2015 00:00

Documentos publicados por Filtrala.org exponen que la agencia utiliza un programa camuflado para obtener metadatos de los servidores DNS y las direcciones HTTP. 

El programa Morecowbell (literalmente “más cencerro”, que tomaría su nombre de un popular skecth de Saturday Night Life) vuelve a poner en evidencia las maniobras de la Agencia de Seguridad Nacional estadounidense, NSA.

Documentos secretos publicados el 24 de enero por Filtrala.org, plataforma en la que participan eldiario.es, La Marea, Mongolia y Diagonal, y la web AWP, demuestran cómo la NSA está utilizando una estructura de camuflaje para hacer solicitudes a los servidores DNS, base del sistema de nombres de dominios a través del que funciona el internet que conocemos. Los documentos, en forma de presentación del tipo powerpoint, muestran las estrategias usadas por la NSA para que sus solicitudes de información a los DNS, miles cada hora, queden camufladas. El objetivo, obtener los metadatos (por ejemplo registros de llamadas, tráfico de internet o datos de localización) sobre servicios presentes en los DNS y las peticiones HTTP. Los documentos a los que Diagonal ha tenido acceso hoy detallan que la NSA ha alquilado servidores en Malasia, Alemania y Dinamarca.

La estructura utilizada es hasta cierto punto sencilla. La agencia tiene agencias de monitoreo que funcionan mediante varios bots morecowbell, que solicitan información DNS en común y solicitudes HTTP por separado al website de referencia, por ejemplo Filtrala.org. Esos bots envían la información directa y regularmente a la infraestructura de la NSA, que analiza los resultados.


GCHQ captured emails of journalists from top international media | UK news | The Guardian

GCHQ captured emails of journalists from top international media | UK news | The Guardian.

 

• Snowden files reveal emails of BBC, NY Times and more
• Agency includes investigative journalists on ‘threat’ list
• Editors call on Cameron to act against snooping on media

 

GCHQ
The journalists’ communications were among 70,000 emails harvested in less than 10 minutes on one day in November 2008 by GCHQ. Photograph: GCHQ/EPA

GCHQ’s bulk surveillance of electronic communications has scooped up emails to and from journalists working for some of the US and UK’s largest media organisations, analysis of documents released by whistleblower Edward Snowden reveals.

Emails from the BBC, Reuters, the Guardian, the New York Times, Le Monde, the Sun, NBC and the Washington Post were saved by GCHQ and shared on the agency’s intranet as part of a test exercise by the signals intelligence agency.

The disclosure comes as the British government faces intense pressure to protect the confidential communications of reporters, MPs and lawyers from snooping.

The journalists’ communications were among 70,000 emails harvested in the space of less than 10 minutes on one day in November 2008 by one of GCHQ’s numerous taps on the fibre-optic cables that make up the backbone of the internet.

The communications, which were sometimes simple mass-PR emails sent to dozens of journalists but also included correspondence between reporters and editors discussing stories, were retained by GCHQ and were available to all cleared staff on the agency intranet. There is nothing to indicate whether or not the journalists were intentionally targeted.

The mails appeared to have been captured and stored as the output of a then-new tool being used to strip irrelevant data out of the agency’s tapping process.

New evidence from other UK intelligence documents revealed by Snowden also shows that a GCHQ information security assessment listed “investigative journalists” as a threat in a hierarchy alongside terrorists or hackers.


Sony Hack: Clooney Says Movie is about Snowden, Not Journalism – The Intercept

Sony Hack: Clooney Says Movie is about Snowden, Not Journalism – The Intercept.

BY NATASHA VARGAS-COOPER 

Featured photo - Sony Hack: Clooney Says Movie is about Snowden, Not Journalism

As curious journalists, tabloid writers, and Hollywood watchers pore over the massive trove of hacked Sony data, the public is being given a rare glimpse into the complicated world of Hollywood and politics. Tucked between bitchy emails about Angelina Jolie and snarky comments on Will Smith’s family are details of a chummy relationship between Sony executives and the CIA, as well as rare insight into how Hollywood views potential movies about NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden.

Sony’s plan to make a Snowden movie got rolling in January 2014, when Elizabeth Cantillon, then an executive producer at Sony, sentcompany Co-Chairman Amy Pascal an email saying she had successfully closed on the rights to the book, “No Place to Hide,” by The Intercept‘s founding editor, Glenn Greenwald.  “[Y]ou will be my Oscar date,” Cantillon promised Pascal.

In March of 2014, Sony officially optioned the rights to Greenwald’s book, which chronicles how he broke the Snowden story, and moved forward with plans for a movie.


Entrevista a Julian Assange, fundador de Wikileaks: “Google nos espía e informa al Gobierno de Estados Unidos”

Entrevista a Julian Assange, fundador de Wikileaks: “Google nos espía e informa al Gobierno de Estados Unidos”.

Escrito por Ignacio Ramonet / Le Monde Diplomatique
Lunes, 01 de Diciembre de 2014 11:59

Desde hace treinta meses, Julian Assange, paladín de la lucha por una información libre, vive en Londres, refugiado en las oficinas de la Embajada de Ecuador. Este país latinoamericano tuvo el coraje de brindarle asilo diplomático cuando el fundador de WikiLeaks se hallaba perseguido y acosado por el Gobierno de Estados Unidos y varios de sus aliados (el Reino Unido, Suecia). El único crimen de Julian Assange es haber dicho la verdad y haber difundido, vía WikiLeaks, entre otras revelaciones, las siniestras realidades ocultas de las guerras de Irak y de Afganistán, y los tejemanejes e intrigas de la diplomacia estadounidense.

Como Edward Snowden, Chelsea Manning y Glenn Greenwald, Julian Assange forma parte de un nuevo grupo de disidentes que, por descubrir la verdad, son ahora rastreados, perseguidos y hostigados no por regímenes autoritarios sino por Estados que pretenden ser “democracias ejemplares”…

En su nuevo libro, Cuando Google encontró a WikiLeaks (Clave Intelectual, Madrid, 2014), cuya versión en español está en librerías desde el 1 de diciembre, Julian Assange va más lejos en sus revelaciones, estupendamente documentadas, como siempre. Todo parte de una larga conversación que Assange sostuvo, en junio de 2011, con Eric Schmidt, presidente ejecutivo de Google. Este vino a entrevistar al creador de WikiLeaks para un ensayo que estaba preparando sobre el futuro de la era digital. Cuando se publicó el libro, titulado The New Digital Era (2013), Assange constató que sus declaraciones habían sido tergiversadas y que las tesis defendidas por Schmidt eran considerablemente delirantes y megalomaníacas. El nuevo libro del fundador de WikiLeaks es su respuesta a esas elucubraciones del presidente de Google. Entre muchas otras cosas, Assange revela cómo Google –y Facebook, y Amazon, etc.– nos espía y nos vigila; y cómo transmite esa información a las agencias de inteligencia de Estados Unidos. Y cómo la empresa líder en tecnologías digitales tiene una estrecha relación, casi estructural, con el Departamento de Estado. Afirma también Assange, que hoy, las grandes empresas de la galaxia digital nos vigilan y nos controlan más que los propios Estados.

Cuando Google encontró a WikiLeaks es una obra inteligente, estimulante y necesaria. Una fiesta para el espíritu. Nos abre los ojos sobre nuestras propias prácticas de comunicación cotidianas cuando usamos un smartphone, una tablet, un ordenador o cuando navegamos simplemente por Internet con la candidez de quien se cree más libre que nunca. ¡Ojo! Nos explica Assange, como Pulgarcito, vas sembrando rastros de ti mismo y de tu vida privada que algunas empresas, como Google, recogen con sumo cuidado y archivan secretamente. Un día, las utilizarán contra ti…

Para conversar de todo esto y de algunas cosas más, nos encontramos con un Julian Assange entusiasta y fatigado, en Londres, el pasado 24 de octubre, en una pequeña sala acogedora de la Embajada de Ecuador. Llega sonriente y pálido, con una barba rubia de varios días, con su cabeza de ángel prerrafaelista, cabellos largos, rasgos finos, ojos claros… Es alto y delgado. Habla con voz muy baja y lenta. Lo que dice es profundo y pensado, le sale de muy adentro. Tiene un algo de gurú… Habíamos previsto charlar no más de media hora, para no cansarlo, pero con el paso del tiempo la conversación se fue poniendo interesante. Y finalmente hablamos más de dos horas y media…


Laura Poitras: "Sé que estaré bajo el radar de las agencias de inteligencia de todo el mundo"

Laura Poitras: “Sé que estaré bajo el radar de las agencias de inteligencia de todo el mundo”.

La documentalista que ayudó a Snowden presenta su documental en Europa, ‘Citizenfour’, donde muestra cómo fue la preparación de la mayor filtración de la historia

“Snowden no está cooperando o trabajando para ninguna otra agencia de inteligencia, eso es simplemente una historia creada por el Gobierno”, asegura la periodista, elegida por el propio extrabajador de la NSA para hacer pública su filtración

“Lo que Glenn y yo publicamos ahora con Snowden cuestiona directamente el liderazgo de Obama”

 

 

Laura Poitras, documentalista que ayudó a Edward Snowden. Foto cedida por su agente (PRAXIS FILMS)

Laura Poitras, documentalista que ayudó a Edward Snowden. Foto cedida por su agente (PRAXIS FILMS)

 

 

A estas alturas de la película, ¿quién no sabe quién es Edward Snowden? Su denuncia sobre los sistemas de espionaje masivo e indiscriminado utilizados por la Agencia de Seguridad Nacional de Estados Unidos (NSA) contra gobiernos, corporaciones y hasta sus propios ciudadanos ha pasado ya a la historia como la mayor filtración de un trabajador de los servicios de inteligencia jamás publicada. Y si a alguien hemos de dar gracias por ello –además de al joven informático– es a Laura Poitras, documentalista estadounidense afincada en Berlín, a quien Citizenfour eligió para hacer pública su historia “sin importar lo que le pasara a él”. Ella, arriesgando también su vida, así lo hizo.


Edward Snowden: state surveillance in Britain has no limits | World news | The Guardian

Edward Snowden: state surveillance in Britain has no limits | World news | The Guardian.

Whistleblower and former NSA analyst says UK regulation allows GCHQ snooping to go beyond anything seen in US
 Edward Snowden
John Naughton interviews Edward Snowden via Skype at the Observer Festival of Ideas Photograph: Alicia Canter For The Guardian for the Guardian

The UK authorities are operating a surveillance system where “anything goes” and their interceptions are more intrusive to people’s privacy than has been seen in the US, Edward Snowden said.

Speaking via Skype at the Observer Ideas festival, held in central London, the whistleblower and former National Security Agency specialist, said there were “really no limits” to the GCHQ’s surveillance capabilities.

He said: “In the UK … is the system of regulation where anything goes. They collect everything that might be interesting. It’s up to the government to justify why it needs this. It’s not up to you to justify why it doesn’t … This is where the danger is, when we think about … evidence being gathered against us but we don’t have the opportunity to challenge that in courts. It undermines the entire system of justice.”

He also said he thought that the lack of coverage by the UK papers of the story, or the hostile coverage of it, other than by the Guardian, “did a disservice to the public”.

His appearance at the festival on Sunday marked the end of a weekend of almost frenetic social activity by his highly reclusive standards: he appeared at two public events and was the absent star of Laura Poitras’ documentary, Citizenfour, which premiered in New York on Friday.

Collectively, the events revealed a more rounded, human, portrait of the former NSA analyst than had been seen before, and offered a few telling glimpses of what his life was now like in Moscow.


The Snowden documentary shows that only government transparency can stop leaks | Trevor Timm | Comment is free | theguardian.com

The Snowden documentary shows that only government transparency can stop leaks | Trevor Timm | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

Edward Snowden’s leaks are not isolated incidents – or, at least they won’t be when we look back on this era 10 years from now

edward snowden pensive
Edward Snowden won’t be the last whistleblower. Photograph: Photo courtesy of The Guardian/EPA

Transparency is coming, whether the government likes it or not. The only question is whether they decide to bring it to the public before whistleblowers do it for them.

That’s the underlying message of Laura Poitras’ mesmerizing new documentary, Citizenfour about Edward Snowden and the National Security Agency that debuted at the New York Film Festival on Friday night.

Others have hinted in the past that the government better act fast to stem the tide of unnecessary secrecy or have a revolt on its hands. Shortly after the first Snowden leaks (which are chronicled in real-time in the film), journalist Glenn Greenwald told Newsweek:

“Government and businesses cannot function without enormous amounts of data, and many people have to have access to that data,” Greenwald says, adding that it only takes one person with access and an assaulted consciences to leak, no matter what controls are in place.

But during the enthralling second act of the film, where Poitras and Greenwald met a then-unknown Edward Snowden at his Hong Kong hotel, Snowden hints at how realistic that prediction would become.

As he talks to Poitras about the potential consequences of his actions on his own life, Snowden explains that he’s confident that the coming government pursuit of him will only encourage others. It’s like the internet principle of the Hydra, he says: “They can stomp me if they want to, but there will be seven more to take my place.”

In the dramatic conclusion of the film, Snowden learns on-camera Poitras and Greenwald now have a new source, who gave The Intercept information about the US government’s enormous “terrorism” watchlist. That watchlist, which contains 1.2 million names – most of which have no direct nexus to terrorism – is governed by Kafkaesque secrecy rules that were recently ruled unconstitutional (and which took another blow from a fed-up federal judge on Friday night).


Joseph Gordon Levitt to play Edward Snowden in Oliver Stone's NSA whistleblower movie | Film | theguardian.com

Joseph Gordon Levitt to play Edward Snowden in Oliver Stone’s NSA whistleblower movie | Film | theguardian.com.

Dark Knight Rises star to take central role in one of two duelling versions of account of National Security Agency files leak, adapted from Guardian journalist’s book

 

 

 

Taking on the NSA as Snowden ... Joseph Gordon-Levitt
Taking on the NSA as Snowden … Joseph Gordon-Levitt Photograph: AP, Guardian

 

Joseph Gordon-Levitt has agreed to take the lead role in Oliver Stone’s forthcoming biopic of the NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, reports Variety.

Negotiations on the deal have not yet begun, but both men are keen on making it happen. Production on The Snowden Files, titled after the book by Guardian journalist Luke Harding, is due to begin late this year or in the early part of 2015.

The film, which Stone is writing and directing, now looks likely to be based on two books, Harding’s account – full title The Snowden Files: The Inside Story of the World’s Most Wanted Man – and Time of the Octopus by Snowden’s lawyer, Anatoly Kucherena. Stone recently picked up the screen rights to the latter tome after optioning Harding’s book in June.