Gobiernos en guerra contra WhatsApp por su cifrado de extremo a extremo – El Mostrador

Tras el ataque al Parlamento Británico ocurrido la semana pasada, los políticos británicos han exigido que Whatsapp y otras aplicaciones de mensajería instantánea proporcionen acceso a la policía y fuerzas de seguridad para así poder monitorear conversaciones terroristas. Sin embargo, los expertos en tecnología discuten que abrir las “puertas traseras” de los servicios de mensajería popular, las cuales usan cifrado de extremo a extremo, arrojaría una serie de problemas.

Fuente: Gobiernos en guerra contra WhatsApp por su cifrado de extremo a extremo – El Mostrador


Take that, FBI: Apple goes all in on encryption | Technology | The Guardian

The new feature is just the latest move towards more widespread encryption in consumer technology products following Apple’s standoff with the FBI earlier in 2016, in which it refused to help the agency weaken its own security processes to access information on an iPhone belonging to a terrorist. Facebook and Google both pledged support for Apple during the fight, and both are subsequently reported to be planning encrypted versions of their messaging apps.

Fuente: Take that, FBI: Apple goes all in on encryption | Technology | The Guardian


Microsoft y Apple redoblan lucha por privacidad de datos en EEUU – El Mostrador

Si bien estos casos judiciales destacados han sumado impulso, la ofensiva del sector contra la intrusión gubernamental en la información privada de los clientes comenzó hace al menos dos años, luego de las revelaciones de Edward Snowden sobre la recolección encubierta de datos que pusieron a todos a la defensiva.

Fuente: Microsoft y Apple redoblan lucha por privacidad de datos en EEUU – El Mostrador


Apple Macs targeted by KeRanger ransomware for first time | Technology | The Guardian

Apple customers were targeted by hackers over the weekend in the first campaign against Macintosh computers using a pernicious type of software known as ransomware, researchers with Palo Alto Networks have revealed.Ransomware, one of the fastest-growing types of cyber threats, encrypts data on infected machines, then typically asks users to pay ransoms in hard-to-trace digital currencies to get an electronic key so they can retrieve their data.

Fuente: Apple Macs targeted by KeRanger ransomware for first time | Technology | The Guardian


NSA Is Mysteriously Absent From FBI-Apple Fight

The Federal Bureau of Investigation insisted that it was helpless. The bureau told a judge in February that Apple has the “exclusive technical means” to try to unlock the contents of San Bernardino shooter Syed Rizwan Farook’s iPhone — and that’s why it should be forced to do so. But notably missing from the FBI’s argument was any mention of whether it had consulted spies and sleuths from the government’s intelligence community — particularly the National Security Agency. The Twitterverse exploded with q

Fuente: NSA Is Mysteriously Absent From FBI-Apple Fight


Apple gains support from tech rivals in FBI case – FT.com

ft.com > Companies >TechnologySubscribe Sign in Home World Companies Energy Financials Health Industrials Luxury 360 Media Retail & Consumer Tech Telecoms Transport By Region Tools Markets Global Economy Lex Comment Management Life & Arts March 4, 2016 2:25 amApple gains support from tech rivals in FBI caseTim Bradshaw in San Francisco Share Print Clip CommentsFBI and Apple logos©FBI/AppleAmerica’s largest technology companies have joined Apple’s fight against the government over data protection and security, in an unusual display of unity by the Silicon Valley rivals.More than a dozen motions filed on Thursday sided with Apple as it tries to resist a demand to write software that would help the FBI unlock the San Bernardino shooter’s iPhone. Civil liberties groups and IT trade associations lined up alongside dozens of law professors and cryptography experts, after Apple filed its own motion for the judicial order to be withdrawn last week.

Fuente: Apple gains support from tech rivals in FBI case – FT.com


What has the FBI ordered Apple to do and why is it refusing? – FT.com

What has Apple been ordered to do?The US court has told Apple to write a piece of software that lowers an iPhone’s defences, enabling the FBI to use brute force to break in by bombarding the device with many possible passwords until it gets the right answer. The new tool would do three things:

Fuente: What has the FBI ordered Apple to do and why is it refusing? – FT.com


Wanting it badly isn't enough: backdoors and weakened crypto threaten the net / Boing Boing

As you know, Apple just said no to the FBI’s request for a backdoor in the iPhone, bringing more public attention to the already hot discussion on encryption, civil liberties, and whether “those in authority” should have the ability to see private content and communications — what’s referred to as “exceptional access.”

Fuente: Wanting it badly isn’t enough: backdoors and weakened crypto threaten the net / Boing Boing


Apple’s FBI Battle Is Complicated. Here’s What’s Really Going On | WIRED

The news this week that a magistrate ordered Apple to help the FBI hack an iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino shooter suspects has polarized the nation—and also generated some misinformation.  In the interest of clarifying the facts and correcting some misinformation, we’ve pulled together a summary of the issues at hand.

Fuente: Apple’s FBI Battle Is Complicated. Here’s What’s Really Going On | WIRED


Bill Gates backs FBI in battle with Apple over San Bernardino killer's phone | Technology | The Guardian

US government is asking for a particular case, and Apple should comply, says Microsoft co-founder Gates

Fuente: Bill Gates backs FBI in battle with Apple over San Bernardino killer’s phone | Technology | The Guardian


Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders Refuse to Choose Between Apple and the FBI

Both candidates tried to occupy a middle ground that doesn’t really exist – either in the war between Apple and the FBI, or when it comes to the spread of unbreakable encryption.

Fuente: Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders Refuse to Choose Between Apple and the FBI


FBI Says Apple Court Order Is Narrow, But Other Law Enforcers Hungry to Exploit It

The Justice Department says Apple can destroy the hacking software it makes after it’s used once. But other law enforcers are already lining up to use it themselves.

Fuente: FBI Says Apple Court Order Is Narrow, But Other Law Enforcers Hungry to Exploit It


Apple to beef up customers’ iCloud encryption – FT.com

Apple is working on new ways to strengthen the encryption of customers’ iCloud backups in a way that would make it impossible for the company to comply with valid requests for data from law enforcement, according to people familiar with its plans.

Fuente: Apple to beef up customers’ iCloud encryption – FT.com


Apple's Tim Cook defends encryption. When will other tech CEOs do so? | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian

More high-profile titans need to use their platforms to make crystal clear how important encryption is to users everywhere

Fuente: Apple’s Tim Cook defends encryption. When will other tech CEOs do so? | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian


Apple believes bill creates ‘key under doormat for bad guys’ – FT.com

Shortly after Theresa May introduced the draft Investigatory Powers bill in November to update the UK’s surveillance laws for the internet age, the home secretary met privately with Tim Cook, Apple’s chief executive. He laid out a number of

Fuente: Apple believes bill creates ‘key under doormat for bad guys’ – FT.com


El iPhone 6 se blinda ante el espionaje | Internacional | EL PAÍS

El iPhone 6 se blinda ante el espionaje | Internacional | EL PAÍS.


Apple no facilitará las claves de sus clientes a la agencia de espionaje de EE UU

El bloqueo del nuevo teléfono inquieta a los servicios de seguridad

Un grupo de personas espera para poder comprar el iPhone6, en Berlín. / HANNIBAL HANSCHKE (REUTERS)

Enviar a LinkedIn39
Enviar a TuentiEnviar a Eskup

EnviarImprimirGuardar

El flamante iPhone 6, recién lanzado al mercado, es el primer teléfono inteligente a prueba de espías. Un algoritmo en su sistema operativo hace que solo el usuario tenga acceso a los contenidos protegidos, con lo que Apple no podría entregar información ni siquiera por orden judicial.

“Si no eres el cliente, eres el producto”, una máxima de Jan Koum, fundador de la aplicación de mensajería móvil WhatsApp, para defender la privacidad de los usuarios vuelve a estar de actualidad. Apple se ha sumado a este principio con iOS 8, el sistema operativo que viene por defecto en los nuevos modelos de iPhone, 6 y 6 Plus.

Tim Cook, consejero delegado de Apple, rompe así el axioma general de Internet. Lo ha explicado en una carta incluida en los cambios de su política de privacidad: “A diferencia de nuestros competidores, Apple no va a pasar por encima de tu contraseña y, en consecuencia, no puede acceder a esos datos. Técnicamente, ya no podremos asumir las peticiones del Gobierno para capturar datos de aparatos que estén en posesión, siempre que tengan instalado iOS8”. No habrá posibilidad, por tanto, de que Apple colabore con la Agencia Nacional de Seguridad (NSA) en caso de que se lo requiera.

En los aparatos de Apple habrá una única manera de descifrar los contenidos protegidos: la clave que da acceso a su identidad de usuario. Hasta ahora, solo el correo @me.com, la cuenta que ofrece a los clientes, seguía esta dinámica. Con el iOS 8 esta función se hace extensiva a mensajes (aplicación que une tanto SMS, WhatsApp…, pero solo entre dispositivos de Apple), calendarios, contactos y fotos.

El nuevo sistema pone la responsabilidad final en cada cliente individual. Antes de la actualización, Apple podía descifrar claves, contraseñas y códigos de bloqueo bajo petición judicial. Ahora ya no podrá hacerlo y derivará las peticiones a los dueños de los móviles.


No, Apple hasn't said it will share an iPhone 5s 'fingerprint database' with the NSA | Technology | theguardian.com

No, Apple hasn’t said it will share an iPhone 5s ‘fingerprint database’ with the NSA | Technology | theguardian.com.

Just because a right-wing ‘satire’ site writes something about the iPhone 5s, that doesn’t make it true: and the characters in quotes saying Apple will share data are made up

 

 

John Lennon fingerprint card

The FBI already keeps a fingerprint database; these were John Lennon’s on his application for permanent US residence. Photograph: Henry S Dziekan III/Getty Images

 

The latest “oh, this must be true because we read it somewhere” is that “Apple is going to share its fingerprint database collected by the iPhone 5s with the National Security Agency”. Reality check: the article claiming this comes from a right-wing “satire” site. Why are people confused? Because the satire’s badly executed.

A lot of people read it but didn’t realise that the satire site was a satire site. (I’ve had at least one email pointing excitedly to it, and not ironically.) This isn’t surprising, because the thing about satire is that you either have to lay it on with a trowel, or get so close to the bone (eg The Thick Of It) that it’s indistinguishable from painful reality. It’s easy to do badly. And the site in question, National Report, does it really badly. It’s like Fox News, but with the jokes and facts taken out.

Even so, you’d hope people who read such “stories” might think a bit. Or that they might even look at other headlines on the site, and wonder if a site which has a story headlined “Apple iPhone 5s Fingerprint Data To Be Shared With NSA” but also has one headlined “Packers Embarrassing Loss to Bengals Linked To Green Bay Bridge Collapse” and “Taurus Firearms Company Introduces The New Trayvon PK-10 or ‘Perp-Killer’” is entirely serious. (It isn’t actually funny, especially the latter headline; if you’re easily offended, don’t read the story that goes with it. But that’s another matter.)

Let’s recap what we do know about the iPhone 5s‘s fingerprint system.