Big banks plan to coin new digital currency – FT.com

Four of the world’s biggest banks have teamed up to develop a new form of digital cash that they believe will become an industry standard to clear and settle financial trades over blockchain, the technology underpinning bitcoin.

Fuente: Big banks plan to coin new digital currency – FT.com


All Bitfinex clients to share 36% loss of assets following exchange hack | Technology | The Guardian

Bitfinex, the cryptocurrency exchange that lost $72m (£55m) to hackers last week, has told customers they will lose just over 36% of the assets they had on the platform but will be compensated for these losses with tokens of credit.

Fuente: All Bitfinex clients to share 36% loss of assets following exchange hack | Technology | The Guardian


FBI’s Secret Surveillance Tech Budget Is ‘Hundreds of Millions’

The FBI has “hundreds of millions of dollars” to spend on developing technology for use in both national security and domestic law enforcement investigations — but it won’t reveal the exact amount.

Fuente: FBI’s Secret Surveillance Tech Budget Is ‘Hundreds of Millions’


Craig Wright U-turns on pledge to provide evidence he invented bitcoin | Technology | The Guardian

Alex Hern@alexhernThursday 5 May 2016 13.55 BSTLast modified on Thursday 5 May 2016 15.47 BSTSave for laterCraig Wright, the Australian computer scientist who claimed to be Satoshi Nakamoto, the creator of bitcoin, has backtracked on a pledge to provide proof of his earlier claims.Despite promising on Tuesday that he would be offering “extraordinary evidence” to verify his claim that he is really Satoshi Nakamoto, Wright wiped his blog on Thursday, replacing it only with a message headlined: “I’m Sorry.”

Fuente: Craig Wright U-turns on pledge to provide evidence he invented bitcoin | Technology | The Guardian


Australian Craig Wright claims he is bitcoin founder Satoshi Nakamoto | Technology | The Guardian

Australian entrepreneur Craig Wright has identified himself as Satoshi Nakamato, the pseudonymous creator of the digital currency bitcoin.Wright, who was named as the cryptocurrency’s founder by two separate media investigations in December, made the admission in a blog post on Monday, providing what he says is technical proof of his claim.

Fuente: Australian Craig Wright claims he is bitcoin founder Satoshi Nakamoto | Technology | The Guardian


Europe’s leap into the quantum computing arms race — FT.com

It is a dizzying gamble and there are billions of euros riding on the outcome. If the wager pays off, Europe will hold its own against mighty China and the US; if not, the entire project will be regarded in hindsight as a breathtakingly indulgent folly. I refer, of course, not to the forthcoming referendum on Britain’s EU membership but to the European Commission’s announcement last week that it would be launching a €1bn plan to explore “quantum technologies”. It is the third of the commission’s Future and Emerging Technologies Flagship projects — visionary megaprojects lasting a decade or more. These are challenges too grand — and bets too risky — for a single nation to square up to on its own.

Fuente: Europe’s leap into the quantum computing arms race — FT.com


Apple Macs targeted by KeRanger ransomware for first time | Technology | The Guardian

Apple customers were targeted by hackers over the weekend in the first campaign against Macintosh computers using a pernicious type of software known as ransomware, researchers with Palo Alto Networks have revealed.Ransomware, one of the fastest-growing types of cyber threats, encrypts data on infected machines, then typically asks users to pay ransoms in hard-to-trace digital currencies to get an electronic key so they can retrieve their data.

Fuente: Apple Macs targeted by KeRanger ransomware for first time | Technology | The Guardian


Hacker-fighting prowess on show at cyber security conference – FT.com

Hacker-fighting prowess on show at cyber security conference – FT.com.

A man types on a laptop computer in an arranged photograph taken in Tiskilwa, Illinois, U.S., on Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015. U.S. officials are discussing whether new standards should be set for government action in response to hacks like the one suffered by Sony Pictures Entertainment, such as if a certain level of monetary damage is caused or if values such as free speech are trampled, National Security Agency Director Michael Rogers said in an interview with Bloomberg News. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg©Bloomberg

When cyber security start-ups set out their stalls at the industry‘s largest annual conference on Monday, they will be looking to show off their hacker-fighting prowess not just to buyers of security products, but also to Wall Street investors.

A new generation of cyber security companies is preparing to go public, as analysts predict a rise in security spending by boards desperate to protect themselves from becoming the next Sony Pictures, Home Depot or Target.

Dan Ives, an analyst at FBR Capital Markets, says investors will be flocking to the RSA Conference in San Francisco this week because cyber security is a $15bn-$20bn market opportunity in the next three years.

“Seven or eight years ago you could hear a pin drop at RSA,” he said. “Now it is going to be like a Bon Jovi rock concert.”

“It is the seminal event in cyber security: the new year’s eve, the wedding, the bar mitzvah,” he added.

VC funds have been flooding into cyber security, surpassing $1bn for the first time in the first quarter of 2015, according to data from private company research firm PrivCo. VC funding for security software start-ups hit $2.3bn in 2014, up more than a third from the year before. Just four years ago, less than $1bn was raised by cyber security companies for a whole year.

 


Bitcoin Foundation vice chair arrested for money laundering | Technology | theguardian.com

Bitcoin Foundation vice chair arrested for money laundering | Technology | theguardian.com.

Charlie Shrem stands accused of knowingly selling over $1m of bitcoins to users of the Silk Road online black-marketplace

 

 

A screengrab of the Silk Road after it was shut down in October.
A screengrab of the Silk Road after it was shut down in October. Photograph: David Colbran/Demotix/Corbis

 

The vice chair of the Bitcoin Foundation, Charlie Shrem, has been arrested for conspiracy to commit money laundering and operating an unlicensed money transmitting business.

The arrest comes as a major blow for the digital currency lobby group. Bitcoin Foundation staff have been working hard to distance the digital currency from its links to crime. They testified to the Senate last year and have been lobbying regulators in Washington.

Patrick Murck, Bitcoin’s general counsel, said: “I don’t think it’s damaging for the Foundation. Foundation wasn’t involved in any of the allegations.”

The charges stem from Shrem’s ownership of the BitInstant bitcoin exchange, of which he is the chief executive, co-founder and compliance officer. The exchange hit the headlines in May 2013 when the Winklevoss brothers led a seed round which raised $1.5m of investment.

A second man, Robert Faiella, has also been arrested and charged for the same crimes relating to his operation of a small bitcoin exchange under the name BTCKing.

The charges, unsealed by the Manhattan distort attorney Preet Bharara, accuse the pair of “engaging in a scheme to sell over $1m in bitcoins to users of Silk Road”, the online black marketplace which was closed by the FBI in October 2013.

Shrem is additionally charged with “wilfully failing to file any suspicious activity report regarding Faiella’s illegal transactions through the company,” the documents reveal.