Ecuador: ¿protección de datos personales o censura? | Derechos Digitales

En la Asamblea Nacional de Ecuador se propuso una ley para proteger la intimidad y privacidad en los datos personales. Sin embargo, algunos de los artículos ponen en riesgo la libertad de expresión y acceso a la información en internet.

Fuente: Ecuador: ¿protección de datos personales o censura? | Derechos Digitales


“Derecho al olvido” en Latinoamérica: un paso hacia adelante, dos pasos hacia atrás | Derechos Digitales

Los desarrollos más recientes en materia de derecho al olvido en la región muestran a la sociedad civil resistiendo ante el avance de una tendencia hacia la pérdida de la memoria y contra el acceso a la información.

Fuente: “Derecho al olvido” en Latinoamérica: un paso hacia adelante, dos pasos hacia atrás | Derechos Digitales


Brazilian Cybercrime Bills Threaten Open Internet for 200 Million People

Brazilian internet freedom activists are nervous. On Wednesday, a committee in the lower house of Congress, the Câmera dos Deputados, will vote on seven proposals ostensibly created to combat cybercrime. Critics argue the combined effect will be to substantially restrict open internet in the country by peeling back the right to anonymity, and providing law enforcement with draconian powers to censor online discourse and examine citizens’ personal data without judicial oversight.The bills are ripped straight from what has become a standard international playbook: Propose legislation to combat cybercrime; invoke child pornography, hackers, organized crime, and even terrorism; then slip in measures that also make it easier to identify critical voices online (often without judicial oversight) and either mute them or throw them in jail for defamation — direct threats to free speech.

Fuente: Brazilian Cybercrime Bills Threaten Open Internet for 200 Million People


Those Demanding Free Speech Limits to Fight ISIS Pose a Greater Threat to U.S. Than ISIS

We’ve been told for years that The Terrorists “hate our freedoms,” yet we cannot seem to rid ourselves of those who think the solution is to voluntarily abolish those freedoms ourselves.

Fuente: Those Demanding Free Speech Limits to Fight ISIS Pose a Greater Threat to U.S. Than ISIS


French surveillance bill draws criticism from web firms and civil liberty groups | World news | The Guardian

French surveillance bill draws criticism from web firms and civil liberty groups | World news | The Guardian.

New legislation, designed to monitor would-be Islamist attackers, would allow spies to tap phones and emails without permission from judges

French interior minister Bernard Cazeneuve.
French interior minister Bernard Cazeneuve said: ‘The measures are not aimed at installing generalised surveillance. On the contrary it aims to target people who we need to monitor to protect the French people.’ Photograph: Yoan Valat/EPA

French spies could get more powers to bug and track would-be Islamist attackers inside the country and require internet companies to monitor suspicious behaviour under a bill to be debated in parliament on Monday.

Web hosting companies have raised concerns that the legislation could frighten away clients, while advocates for civil liberties say it lacks adequate privacy protections – concerns dismissed by the government.

More than three months after 17 people were killed in attacks by three gunmen in Paris, the government is pushing measures that would allow spy agencies to tap phones and emails without seeking permission from a judge.

Surveillance staff will also be able to bug suspects’ flats with microphones and cameras and add “keyloggers” to their computers to track every keystroke.

“The measures proposed are not aimed at installing generalised surveillance,” the interior minister, Bernard Cazeneuve, said in an interview with the newspaper Libération. “On the contrary it aims to target people who we need to monitor to protect the French people.”

France is monitoring an estimated 1,200 Islamists and about 200 people who have returned from fighting with militant groups in Syria and Iraq.

It has earmarked about €425m (£300m) to recruit thousands of extra police, spies and investigators to beef up surveillance and boost national security and intelligence.

Former US National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden last year disclosed classified details about the breadth of the intelligence gathering, triggering an international outcry.

Among those critical of the French bill are internet service providers who in a column published on 9 April threatened to relocate outside of France because the bill would allow intelligence services to place “black boxes” on their infrastructure with algorithms to filter communications.


France: Bill Opens Door to Surveillance Society | Human Rights Watch

France: Bill Opens Door to Surveillance Society | Human Rights Watch.

Short-Changes Rights Obligations; Bad Model for Other Countries
APRIL 7, 2015
Though the goal of the bill is to place France’s surveillance practices under the rule of law, it in fact uses law to clothe a naked expansion of surveillance powers. France can do much better than this, especially if it wants to distance itself from the overreaching and secretive mass surveillance practices of the US and the UK that have attracted so many legal challenges.
Dinah PoKempner, Human Rights Watch general counsel

(Paris) – Draft legislation authorizing sweeping powers of digital surveillance is inconsistent with France’s international human rights commitments, Human Rights Watch said today. The bill, which has already won approval of the National Assembly’s Law Commission, would create a highly damaging model for other countries and should be reconsidered and revised, not rushed through the parliament.

The bill (“draft law on intelligence,” projet de loi relatif au renseignement”), which was planned even before the Charlie Hebdo and Hyper-Casher supermarket attacks, is slated for plenary consideration by the National Assembly beginning April 13, 2015, under an accelerated legislative procedure that precludes a second reading. Serious flaws include expansive powers for the prime minister to authorize surveillance for purposes far beyond those recognized in international human rights law; lack of meaningful judicial oversight; requirements for private service providers to monitor and analyze user data and report suspicious patterns; prolonged retention periods for some captured data; and little public transparency.

“Though the goal of the bill is to place France’s surveillance practices under the rule of law, it in fact uses law to clothe a naked expansion of surveillance powers,” said Dinah PoKempner, Human Rights Watch general counsel. “France can do much better than this, especially if it wants to distance itself from the overreaching and secretive mass surveillance practices of the US and the UK that have attracted so many legal challenges.”


Derecho al olvido: Los asesores de Google recomiendan recortar el ‘derecho al olvido’ para figuras públicas | Tecnología | EL PAÍS

Derecho al olvido: Los asesores de Google recomiendan recortar el ‘derecho al olvido’ para figuras públicas | Tecnología | EL PAÍS.


El consejo de asesores creado por la compañía considera que la eliminación de enlaces con información personal depende de la relevancia social

El consejo asesor de Google en su primera reunión en Madrid. / DANIEL OCHOA DE OLZA (AP)

“Individuos con roles claros en la sociedad (por ejemplo, políticos, CEOs, líderes religiosos, estrellas del deporte, artistas escénicos): las solicitudes de borrado para tales individuos son menos susceptibles de justificarse, ya que el público tendrá generalmente un interés predominante en encontrar información sobre ellos a través de una búsqueda de su nombre”. Y unos párrafos después: “Se ha de prestar especial atención al contenido de las solicitudes de borrado, ya que los datos del sujeto pueden estar circunscritos a su rol público. Por ejemplo, podría haber un interés en tener información sobre nepotismo familiar a la hora de contratar”.

El derecho a salir de Google no debe ser universal. Eso concluye el informe El consejo asesor para Google sobre el derecho a ser olvidado, que ha sido publicado hoy. Sylvie Kauffman, directora editorial de Le Monde; Sabine Leutheusser-Schnarrenberger, ministra de Justicia y Protección al Consumidor alemana de 2009 a 2013; o Luciano Floridi, profesor de Filosofía y Ética de Oxford, son parte de este consejo que Google ha armado como órgano consultivo para asumir su obligación de velar por el borrado de enlaces de información personal en su buscador. Este deber fue fruto de un mandato del Tribunal de Justicia de la Unión Europea del 13 de mayo de 2014 a raíz del juicio de Mario Costeja contra el buscador. Este abogado español pidió que Google no indexara un artículo deLa Vanguardia de 1998 sobre una subasta de inmuebles relacionada con un embargo por deudas a la Seguridad Social. Desde mayo, Google ha recibido 212.673 peticiones de borradoque afectan a 769.858 URL.


Google Advisory Group Says Limit ‘Right to Be Forgotten’ to EU – WSJ

Google Advisory Group Says Limit ‘Right to Be Forgotten’ to EU – WSJ.


Search Giant Named Eight-Member Committee in May to Give Guidance on EU Court Order

Google named an eight-member committee in May to guide it on implementing an EU court order to scrub personal information from search results upon request.ENLARGE
Google named an eight-member committee in May to guide it on implementing an EU court order to scrub personal information from search results upon request. PHOTO: ASSOCIATED PRESS

An advisory group convened by Google Inc. backed the online search giant’s decision to apply Europe’s “right to be forgotten” ruling only in the European Union, adding fuel to Google’s showdown with EU regulators who have said the company must apply the rule globally.

Google named the eight-member committee in May to guide it on implementing an EU court decision ordering it to scrub personal information from search results for individuals’ names upon their request. The ruling required search engines to remove the personal information unless they judge it to be public interest—but was silent on the ruling’s geographic scope.

While Google moved quickly to apply the ruling over the summer, it has only applied removals to European domains, such as Google.fr or Google.co.uk, but not Google.com, even when accessed in Europe. That can make it easier to find results that have been removed, by comparing the websites—angering regulators who said that undermined European residents’ privacy rights.

In a 44-page report issued early Friday, a majority of the Google-organized panel—whose members say they weren’t paid beyond their expenses—backed the company’s position, saying users outside Europe had interests in seeking information and restrictions may run up against laws in other countries. The panel also backed the company’s decision to inform publishers when it removed their links from results, but suggested it go further to allow them to appeal those decisions.

The report, which some European privacy officials have described as a public-relations maneuver, may exacerbate a broader showdown with EU officials over how broadly to interpret and apply European privacy rules. The EU court decision said that EU privacy rules must apply to any company that does business in the bloc. But Silicon Valley companies and others in the U.S. bristle at rules that could impinge on freedom of speech.

 


Farías (PPD) defiende proyecto de medios digitales y niega que atente contra la “libertad de expresión” – El Mostrador

Farías (PPD) defiende proyecto de medios digitales y niega que atente contra la “libertad de expresión” – El Mostrador.

“Se ha prestado para malinterpretaciones porque la gente cree que si publica en su Facebook más de cuatro veces será automáticamente considerado diario”, dijo el parlamentario después de la batahola que causó en las redes sociales una columna de la ONG Derechos Digitales que disparó contra varios aspectos de la iniciativa.

ramonfarias

Una columna publicada por la abogada Rayén Campusano, encargada de políticas públicas de la ONG Derechos Digitales, encendió el lunes último las redes sociales después de acusar al proyecto de ley de Medios Digitales de “atentar contra la libertad de expresión”, por el hecho -aseguró- de terminar con el anonimato en la red y obligar a los autores de distintos blogs a iniciar actividades y a realizar un pago legal a la Biblioteca Nacional si actualizaban o posteban en su página más de cuatro veces a la semana.


Chile: ley de medios digitales es un atentado a libertad de expresión – ONG Derechos Digitales

Chile: ley de medios digitales es un atentado a libertad de expresión – ONG Derechos Digitales.

El proyecto de ley de medios digitales que se discute en la Cámara, hará que todos quienes posean un sitio web o red social con cuatro publicaciones semanales, sean consideradas responsables de un medio de comunicación social. Acá te contamos cómo te afecta si eres un usuario o usuaria de Internet en Chile.

El proyecto de ley de medios digitales impone cargas extremadamente onerosas, desproporcionadas e injustificadas a los usuarios y usuarias de Internet

En Chile, hay una creciente tendencia en parlamentarios de presentar proyectos de ley que castigan más duramente acciones realizadas por Internet. Un ejemplo claro de ello es la denominada ley de medios de comunicación digital (proyectos de ley 9460-19 y 9461-19 que modifican la Ley 19.733), que ya informamos en su oportunidad, y que ha encontrado un terreno fértil en la Cámara de Diputados donde ha avanzado de manera firme, a pesar de sus múltiples y evidentes problemas.

Si usas Internet, te invitamos a estar atento a los siguientes aspectos de la ley que, de aprobarse, afectarán para siempre tu libertad de expresión en Internet.


Confundador de Pirate Bay es hallado culpable de piratería informática en Dinamarca – BioBioChile

Confundador de Pirate Bay es hallado culpable de piratería informática en Dinamarca – BioBioChile.

 

Jon Åslund (cc)Jon Åslund (cc)

Publicado por Javier Cisterna | La Información es de Agencia AFP
 

Uno de los cofundadores del sitio web Pirate Bay, el sueco Gottfrid Svartholm Warg, fue hallado culpable en el caso más importante de piratería informática en Dinamarca, anunció el jueves la justicia danesa.

“El ciudadano sueco de 30 años fue hallado culpable de piratería y de acto malintencionado”, declaró un tribunal de Copenhague. Un danés de 21 años también ha sido hallado culpable por complicidad en un intento de pirateo.

Los dos hombres descargaron ilegalmente ficheros de la policía y de la seguridad social en 2012. Por estos hechos, el fiscal pidió seis años de prisión contra Svartholm Warg, de 30 años, y dos años contra el otro acusado. La pena, no obstante, se conocerá el viernes.

El acusado sueco negó las acusaciones, al afirmar que alguien tomó el control de su ordenador a distancia para acceder a los ficheros.


Emergency surveillance bill to be fast-tracked despite 49 MPs' opposition | Politics | theguardian.com

Emergency surveillance bill to be fast-tracked despite 49 MPs’ opposition | Politics | theguardian.com.

 

Parliament approves timetable motion for Drip bill as government accepts Labour amendments to strengthen safeguards
Tom Watson Labour MP

The Labour MP Tom Watson described the move to rush the bill through parliament as ‘democratic banditry’. Photograph: Andy Rain/EPA

Forty-nine MPs have voted against rushing the government’s emergency surveillance legislation through all its Commons stages in just one day.

A deal between the three major parties, however, secured the fast-track timetable by 436 votes to 49, despite accusations from one Labour MP that the move amounted to “democratic banditry resonant of a rogue state”.

The vote on the timetable motion for the data retention and investigatory powers bill, known as the Drip bill, came as it emerged that the home secretary was to accept Labour amendments strengthening its safeguards.

The government has accepted that the promised longer-term review of all surveillance legislation, known as Ripa, should be written into the Drip bill to put it on a statutory footing, and that there should six-monthly reviews of its operation by the interception commissioner.

The former Tory shadow home secretary David Davis told ministers that the rush to push through the Drip bill undermined parliament’s role.


This surveillance bill puts our hard-won freedom in peril | Harry Leslie Smith | Comment is free | theguardian.com

This surveillance bill puts our hard-won freedom in peril | Harry Leslie Smith | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

All the data retention and investigatory powers bill will do is put a leash on the human spirit and deaden the hearts of those who desire to live in a free and liberal nation
A person writing a text on a mobile phone

‘It will needlessly compel phone and internet companies to retain our online lives, browsing history, texts, emails and intimate, mundane conversations with friends, family and colleagues.’ Photograph: Andy Rain/EPA

Politicians and the media are wont to tell us we live in a time rife with dangers, plots and calumnies. Since 9/11 we have received a daily barrage of news warning us of far-off countries populated by people who have no respect for human life or our democratic institutions. We have been lectured by newsreaders, prime ministers and security pundits that terrorism will invade our shores and take away our freedoms, unless we allow our state, spy agencies and police departments to monitor us through endless trawling of our meta data, emails and private phone conversations.

Yet despite this epidemic of fear, Britain is still sceptical about womb-to-tomb government observation. In fact, a recent Ipsos Mori poll found 68% of those surveyed were concerned about information being collected about them by the government. However, in spite of this overwhelming distrust by the public, the PM and his coalition, along with the Labour party, persist in telling us that there are dark forces which threaten our safety, requiring the government to enact and maintain this invasive, encompassing scrutiny of free citizens.

I grant that we live in perilous times, but I have encountered far worse. As a young man I witnessed the dark clouds of German bombers swarm like malevolent hornets above this country’s cities in the second world war, intent on obliterating every man jack of us. Today, despite the chaos that Isis, al-Qaeda and Boko Haram have created, we as a civilisation are not about to be annihilated by terrorism.

There are more pressing threats to national health and stability than fifth columnists and terrorist sleeper cells. Income inequality, the lack of opportunity for our young, the decline of the NHS, housing poverty, and food and fuel poverty are real dangers to this country’s ability to progress and thrive.

The introduction next week of the data retention and investigatory powers bill by this government is therefore disturbing because it will needlessly compel phone and internet companies to retain our online lives, browsing history, texts, emails and intimate, mundane conversations with friends, family and colleagues. It is being hammered through parliament because Cameron tells us he does not wish to see a catastrophic terrorist attack while he is in charge. I grant his intention is noble, but if parliament doesn’t properly, honestly debate this bill they will make a mockery of democracy and the Westminster system.


¿Por qué las redes sociales en Chile no son seguras para tus derechos? – ONG Derechos Digitales

¿Por qué las redes sociales en Chile no son seguras para tus derechos? – ONG Derechos Digitales.

por  25 de junio, 2014

Es cierto: poner en una misma frase “redes sociales” y “seguridad” es más bien un contrasentido, pero localmente, el problema de inseguridad de los datos personales de los usuarios de estas plataformas reviste una gravedad especial: la policía y la fiscalía chilena las tienen como objetivo de vigilancia, sin garantías para los derechos de privacidad y debido proceso de sus ciudadanos. Al menos, eso se puede concluir con las últimas noticias.

"“Con su explosivo crecimiento los últimos años en Chile, las redes sociales son hoy un “paso obligado” en cualquier investigación (policial". BY (stockdaledesigns)“Con su explosivo crecimiento los últimos años en Chile, las redes sociales son hoy un “paso obligado” en cualquier investigación (policial”. BY (stockdaledesigns)

En una noticia salida hace algunos días en La Segunda, la Brigada del Cibercrimen de la Policía De Investigaciones (PDI), explica cómo la vigilancia a Facebook se ha convertido en un elemento esencial para las investigaciones policiales. En la nota se afirma:

“Con su explosivo crecimiento en los últimos años en Chile, las redes sociales son hoy un “paso obligado” en cualquier investigación, afirman las autoridades. Al empadronamiento tradicional que los policías realizan en terreno se suma hoy un “empadronamiento digital” que puede arrojar resultados igual de valiosos”.

Según la nota, la policía efectivamente ha llegado a establecer la identidad y las relaciones de los delincuentes gracias a las pistas que estos dejan en Facebook. Pero los antecedentes que la policía y la fiscalía entregan en esta noticia, hacen pensar que el precio de ese hecho lo pagan los derechos de privacidad y al debido proceso de todos los chilenos. Dos hechos preocupantes:


Privacy under attack: the NSA files revealed new threats to democracy | Technology | The Guardian

Privacy under attack: the NSA files revealed new threats to democracy | Technology | The Guardian.

Thanks to Edward Snowden, we know the apparatus of repression has been covertly attached to the democratic state. However, our struggle to retain privacy is far from hopeless

US National Security Agency
The US National Security Agency threat operations centre in Fort Meade, Maryland, in 2006. Photograph: Paul Richards/AFP/Getty Images

In the third chapter of his History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Edward Gibbon gave two reasons why the slavery into which the Romans had tumbled under Augustus and his successors left them more wretched than any previous human slavery. In the first place, Gibbon said, the Romans had carried with them into slavery the culture of a free people: their language and their conception of themselves as human beings presupposed freedom. And thus, says Gibbon, for a long time the Romans preserved the sentiments – or at least the ideas – of a freeborn people. In the second place, the empire of the Romans filled all the world, and when that empire fell into the hands of a single person, the world was a safe and dreary prison for his enemies. As Gibbon wrote, to resist was fatal, and it was impossible to fly.

The power of that Roman empire rested in its leaders’ control of communications. The Mediterranean was their lake. Across their European empire, from Scotland to Syria, they pushed roads that 15 centuries later were still primary arteries of European transportation. Down those roads the emperor marched his armies. Up those roads he gathered his intelligence. The emperors invented the posts to move couriers and messages at the fastest possible speed.

Using that infrastructure, with respect to everything that involved the administration of power, the emperor made himself the best-informed person in the history of the world.

That power eradicated human freedom. “Remember,” said Cicero to Marcellus in exile, “wherever you are, you are equally within the power of the conqueror.”

The empire of the United States after the second world war also depended upon control of communications. This was more evident when, a mere 20 years later, the United States was locked in a confrontation of nuclear annihilation with the Soviet Union. In a war of submarines hidden in the dark below the continents, capable of eradicating human civilisation in less than an hour, the rule of engagement was “launch on warning”. Thus the United States valued control of communications as highly as the Emperor Augustus. Its listeners too aspired to know everything.

We all know that the United States has for decades spent as much on its military might as all other powers in the world combined. Americans are now realising what it means that we applied to the stealing of signals and the breaking of codes a similar proportion of our resources in relation to the rest of the world.

The US system of listening comprises a military command controlling a large civilian workforce. That structure presupposes the foreign intelligence nature of listening activities. Military control was a symbol and guarantee of the nature of the activity being pursued. Wide-scale domestic surveillance under military command would have violated the fundamental principle of civilian control.

Instead what it had was a foreign intelligence service responsible to the president as military commander-in-chief. The chain of military command absolutely ensured respect for the fundamental principle “no listening here”. The boundary between home and away distinguished the permissible from the unconstitutional.

The distinction between home and away was at least technically credible, given the reality of 20th-century communications media, which were hierarchically organised and very often state-controlled.

When the US government chose to listen to other governments abroad – to their militaries, to their diplomatic communications, to their policymakers where possible – they were listening in a world of defined targets. The basic principle was: hack, tap, steal. We listened, we hacked in, we traded, we stole.

In the beginning we listened to militaries and their governments. Later we monitored the flow of international trade as far as it engaged American national security interests.


Golpe a CISPA: la Casa Blanca indica que deberá preservar la intimidad y las libertades civiles


Tal y como ocurriera tras la aparición de SOPA, la Casa Blanca ha emitido un comunicado mostrando su preocupación sobre la propuesta de ley que se llevará a debate la próxima semana conocida como CISPA. Según el gobierno de Obama, la regulación no será vetada por la administración, aunque deberá “preservar la intimidad y las libertades civiles”. Un “detalle” que choca frontalmente con la redacción de CISPA.