WOM quiere el poder: la compañía denunció a Entel, Movistar y Claro ante la FNE – El Mostrador

La semana pasada la compañía telefónica denunció a sus competidores ante la Fiscalía Nacional Económica acusándolos de conductas anti competitivas.

Fuente: WOM quiere el poder: la compañía denunció a Entel, Movistar y Claro ante la FNE – El Mostrador


Brussels to tighten grip on web services in telecoms shake-up – FT.com

Brussels will tighten its regulatory grip over online services such as WhatsApp and Skype in a radical overhaul of the EU’s rules on telecoms due out in September. According to internal documents seen by the Financial Times, so-called “over-the-top” services operated by groups such as Facebook, which runs WhatsApp, and Skype owner Microsoft would in future have to abide by “security and confidentiality provisions” demanded by the EU.

Fuente: Brussels to tighten grip on web services in telecoms shake-up – FT.com


Fisa court grants extension of licence for bulk collection of US phone records | World news | theguardian.com

Fisa court grants extension of licence for bulk collection of US phone records | World news | theguardian.com.

Reauthorisation is fifth since the Guardian revealed existence of Section 215 telephony metadata program in June last year
NSA sign

The Fisa court has granted a 90-day extension of the licence that allows the NSA to collect metadata. Photograph: Patrick Semansky/AP

US intelligence agencies have made a fifth attempt to extend their bulk collection of American telephone records – more than a year after the controversial practice was first revealed by National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden.

Despite repeated calls from Congress and President Obama for the mass gathering of private US phone records to be banned, a court has approved the request in secret, allowing the NSA to continue collecting metadata until 12 September 2014.

In a joint statement released late on Friday afternoon, the justice department and director of national intelligence, James Clapper, said it was necessary to continue seeking such legal extensions because the Congressional reform process supported by Obama was not yet complete.

“Given that legislation has not yet been enacted, and given the importance of maintaining the capabilities of the Section 215 telephony metadata program, the government has sought a 90-day reauthorization of the existing program,” said the joint statement.

The 90-day blanket licence granted by the secretive Foreign IntelligenceSurveillance Court, or Fisa court, is the fifth such extension that has been requested, and granted, since the Guardian first revealed the existence of the Section 215 program on 5 June 2013.


Odecu: “Compañías quieren que sigamos pagando los cargos más altos de la OCDE” – El Mostrador

Odecu: “Compañías quieren que sigamos pagando los cargos más altos de la OCDE” – El Mostrador.

La organización de consumidores asegura que los recursos presentados por Entel, Telefónica y Nextel, son “una argucia para seguir ganando a costa de las personas”.

celulares 88

La Organización de Consumidores y Usuarios de Chile (ODECU) lamentó la decisión de la Contraloría General de la República de frenar el decreto tarifario de telefonía celular emitido por la Subsecretaría de Telecomunicaciones (Subtel), en el que se establecía una rebaja de 73% a los cargos de acceso móviles en un plazo de cinco años.

“Es una muy mala noticia para los consumidores que, claramente, nos veíamos beneficiados con las nuevas tarifas”, sostuvo el presidente de ODECU, Stefan Larenas, quien aseguró que, tras la decisión de la Contraloría, “las únicas beneficiadas son las empresas, que quieren que sigamos pagando los cargos de acceso más altos de la OCDE”.

Entel, Telefónica y Nextel impugnaron el decreto tarifario cuestionando lo establecido por la Subtel en cuanto a que, con la rebaja de cargos de interconexión, las empresas puedan autofinanciarse durante los cinco años de vigencia de la nueva fijación.

Al respecto, Larenas sostiene que “puede que haya habido errores en el decreto, sin embargo, la impugnación resulta majadera en el sentido de que, de no haber una rebaja, volveremos a tener los cargos de acceso más altos a nivel OCDE y eso no puede ser”.


Reforming the NSA: the rival plans to curb government surveillance | World news | theguardian.com

Reforming the NSA: the rival plans to curb government surveillance | World news | theguardian.com.

 

Ten months after Edward Snowden revealed that the NSA was collecting US telephone records in bulk, three sets of proposals have emerged to change the way the agency operates. All would end the data collection program in its current form, but there are crucial differences between the rival plans. We take a look at how the proposals compare


Obama formally proposes end to NSA's bulk collection of telephone data | World news | theguardian.com

Obama formally proposes end to NSA’s bulk collection of telephone data | World news | theguardian.com.

President says: ‘I am confident this approach can keep us safe while addressing the legitimate privacy concerns raised’

Obama
Obama is seeking legislation to enact the changes, but it has not settled between competing proposals currently before Congress. Photo: Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

The Obama administration on Thursday formally proposed ending the National Security Agency’s bulk collection of all US phone data.

Nearly 10 months after the Guardian exposed the controversial program, based on leaks from Edward Snowden, President Obama announced that he would seek legislation that would require the NSA to seek an individual order from the secret Fisa court before phone companies turn over data on their customers.

“I have decided that the best path forward is that the government should not collect or hold this data in bulk,” Obama said in a statement. “Instead, the data should remain at the telephone companies for the length of time it currently does today.”

The move goes further than Obama’s position on bulk surveillance in January, when the president left the door open to the possibility of the data being held by a private-sector third party. That position was vigorously opposed by the phone companies and criticised by proponents and critics of the NSA alike.

Bulk phone data would no longer be collected by NSA under the latest proposals. Instead phone companies would, in response to a court order, turn over a suspicious phone number as well as all the numbers it called and received, and all numbers those numbers called and received, on an “ongoing and prospective basis”, according to an administration official.

The administration has yet to decide on a specific time limitation for querying the data, but “there would be some limited time period,” the official told reporters on Thursday. “That’s something we’re going to have to talk with Congress about.”

The Obama administration is seeking legislation to enact the changes, but it has not settled between competing proposals currently before Congress.

“I am confident that this approach can provide our intelligence and law enforcement professionals the information they need to keep us safe while addressing the legitimate privacy concerns that have been raised,” Obama said.

But the NSA is not yet out of the business of harvesting phone data in bulk, which it has done in secret in various forms since late 2001. The administration said it would seek approval from the Fisa court to continue the programs for another 90-day period under restrictions in place since January, until Congress passes a bill along the administration’s guidelines.