Google forced to open up Android to rival search engines in Russia | Technology | The Guardian

Google has been forced to open up Android to rival search engines and applications in Russia, after settling a two-year battle with competition authorities for 439m roubles (£6.2m).

Fuente: Google forced to open up Android to rival search engines in Russia | Technology | The Guardian


Russian court ruling could hit Google – FT.com

A recent court decision could see Google’s market share in online search drop significantly in Russia and have repercussions for a similar antitrust case in the EU, according to Yandex, Google’s main competitor in Russia.

Fuente: Russian court ruling could hit Google – FT.com


Edward Snowden's lawyers 'working' to bring NSA whistleblower back to US | US news | The Guardian

Edward Snowden’s lawyers ‘working’ to bring NSA whistleblower back to US | US news | The Guardian.

Edward Snowden in Citizenfour. Edward Snowden in the Oscar-winning documentary Citizenfour. Photograph: PR

 

 

A Russian lawyer for Edward Snowden, the NSA whistleblower, said on Tuesday that new legal efforts were under way to arrange a return for Snowden to the United States, although such efforts could not be independently confirmed.

 

“I won’t keep it secret that he … wants to return back home,” lawyer Anatoly Kucherena told Reuters. “And we are doing everything possible now to solve this issue. There is a group of US lawyers, there is also a group of German lawyers and I’m dealing with it on the Russian side.”

A US legal adviser to Snowden, Ben Wizner, a lawyer with the American Civil Liberties Union, declined on Wednesday to comment on Kucherena’s statement.


Russia tightens controls on blogosphere | World news | The Guardian

Russia tightens controls on blogosphere | World news | The Guardian.

Bloggers say new law is attempt to crack down on free expression and criticism of Russian government
Putin

Sites to be regulated under the new law were instrumental in organising protests against president Vladimir Putin. Photograph: Sasha Mordovets/Getty Images

A law that comes into effect in Russia on Friday will place tighter controls on the blogosphere, one of the few remaining places where people can freely criticise the government.

The federal mass media watchdog has said the law is meant to “de-anonymise popular websites”. Prominent bloggers argue it is yet another step to crack down on free expression and will be wielded against critics of the regime.

Popularly known as the “law on bloggers,” the legislation requires users of any website whose posts are read by more than 3,000 people each day to publish under their real name and register with the authorities if requested. It also holds popular bloggers to the same standards as the mass media, forbidding false information and foul language, although it doesn’t guarantee them the same rights. Violators could incur fines of up to 50,000 rubles (£800) and be blacklisted.

Facebook, Twitter, LiveJournal and other social media sites regulated under the new law played an instrumental role in organising the protests against president Vladimir Putin in 2011-13 and have provided a vital platform for critical voices, since most nationwide television and print media is controlled by the government.

Already, the authorities enjoy sweeping powers under a 2013 law to close down websites for advocating “extremist activities” or “participation in public events held in breach of appropriate procedures.” In March, the media watchdog blocked three opposition news portals and the LiveJournal blog of opposition leader and anti-corruption activist Alexei Navalny, who specialises in exposés on the luxurious real estate owned by prominent officials, replete with documents and photographs.

Popular blogger and media entrepreneur Anton Nosik called the law on bloggers unconstitutional and said it was meant to intimidate regime critics.