WhatsApp asked by European regulators to pause sharing user data with Facebook | Technology | The Guardian

The letters come as European nations express concern over WhatsApp’s changes and Yahoo’s mishandling of its hack and the revelations over US intelligence operations.

Fuente: WhatsApp asked by European regulators to pause sharing user data with Facebook | Technology | The Guardian


Brussels to tighten grip on web services in telecoms shake-up – FT.com

Brussels will tighten its regulatory grip over online services such as WhatsApp and Skype in a radical overhaul of the EU’s rules on telecoms due out in September. According to internal documents seen by the Financial Times, so-called “over-the-top” services operated by groups such as Facebook, which runs WhatsApp, and Skype owner Microsoft would in future have to abide by “security and confidentiality provisions” demanded by the EU.

Fuente: Brussels to tighten grip on web services in telecoms shake-up – FT.com


America’s broken digital copyright law is about to be challenged in court | Technology | The Guardian

The Electronic Frontier Foundation is suing the US government over ‘unconstitutional’ use of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act

Fuente: America’s broken digital copyright law is about to be challenged in court | Technology | The Guardian


FBI may have found way to unlock San Bernardino shooter’s iPhone without Apple | Technology | The Guardian

Federal authorities have cancelled Tuesday’s court hearing with Apple, saying an ‘outside party’ has shown a potential way to crack Syed Farook’s phone

Fuente: FBI may have found way to unlock San Bernardino shooter’s iPhone without Apple | Technology | The Guardian


Obama Wants Nonexistent Middle Ground on Encryption, Warns Against “Fetishizing Our Phones”

Obama’s first extended disquisition on the contentious issue of encryption suggests he’s only been listening to one side.

Fuente: Obama Wants Nonexistent Middle Ground on Encryption, Warns Against “Fetishizing Our Phones”


Cinco claves sobre el fallo que pone fin a los globos de vigilancia – Derechos Digitales

El fallo establece que el funcionamiento de los globos es ilegal y afectan la vida privada. Además argumenta que la seguridad no es justificación para intromisión en la intimidad y llama la atención sobre la falta de regulación expresa sobre la videovigilancia en Chile.

Fuente: Cinco claves sobre el fallo que pone fin a los globos de vigilancia – Derechos Digitales


Corte de Apelaciones de Santiago prohíbe el funcionamiento de los globos de vigilancia en Las Condes y Lo Barnechea – Derechos Digitales

La tarde de hoy, la Segunda Sala de la Corte de Apelaciones de Santiago ha acogido el recurso de protección interpuesto contra los globos de vigilancia que, desde agosto de 2015, flotan sobre las comunas de Las Condes y Lo Barnechea. Por decisión unánime, la Corte ha decretado el cese inmediato de los planes de vigilancia comunal, argumentando que atentan contra el derecho a la vida privada y la inviolabilidad del hogar, garantizado en el artículo 19 de la Constitución, numerales 4 y 5.

Fuente: Corte de Apelaciones de Santiago prohíbe el funcionamiento de los globos de vigilancia en Las Condes y Lo Barnechea – Derechos Digitales


New Safe Harbor Data “Deal” May Be More Politicking Than Surveillance Reform

European privacy activists criticized a new Safe Harbor data agreement with the U.S. as a superficial political fix that fails to address NSA spying.

Fuente: New Safe Harbor Data “Deal” May Be More Politicking Than Surveillance Reform


¿Tienen las municipalidades más facultades que el Ministerio Público? – Derechos Digitales

A mediados de octubre de 2015, la prensa chilena daba cuenta de la instalación de dos globos aerostáticos en la comuna de Las Condes y uno en Lo Barnechea, supuestamente destinados a incrementar los niveles de seguridad de los habitantes de ambos municipios y a colaborar en la gestión del tránsito de sus calles.

Se trata de tecnología de origen militar: potentes cámaras que flotan sobre las comunas, equipadas con lentes de gran alcance, capaces de efectuar seguimientos en un radio de 3 kilómetros, operadas por una empresa privada y no por funcionarios públicos.

Fuente: ¿Tienen las municipalidades más facultades que el Ministerio Público? – Derechos Digitales

A mediados de octubre de 2015, la prensa chilena daba cuenta de la instalación de dos globos aerostáticos en la comuna de Las Condes y uno en Lo Barnechea, supuestamente destinados a incrementar los niveles de seguridad de los habitantes de ambos municipios y a colaborar en la gestión del tránsito de sus calles.

Se trata de tecnología de origen militar: potentes cámaras que flotan sobre las comunas, equipadas con lentes de gran alcance, capaces de efectuar seguimientos en un radio de 3 kilómetros, operadas por una empresa privada y no por funcionarios públicos.

Fuente: ¿Tienen las municipalidades más facultades que el Ministerio Público? – Derechos Digitales


Obama's Cyber Proposals Sound Good, But Erode Information Security – The Intercept

Obama’s Cyber Proposals Sound Good, But Erode Information Security – The Intercept.

BY DAN FROOMKIN 

The State of the Union address President Obama delivers tonight will include a slate of cyber proposals crafted to sound like timely government protections in an era beset by villainous hackers.

They would in theory help the government and private sector share hack data more effectively; increase penalties for the most troubling forms of hacking; and require better notification of people when their personal data has been stolen.

But if you cut through the spin, it turns out that the steps Obama is proposing would likely erode, rather than strengthen, information security for citizens and computer experts trying to protect them. Consider:

  • There’s plenty of sharing of data on cyber threats already and no reason to think that the Sony Pictures hack or any of the other major recent cyber attacks could have been averted with more. What Obama is proposing would, by contrast, give companies that have terrible security practices a pass in the form of liability protection from regulatory or civil action based on the information they disclose, while potentially allowing widespread distribution of personal data that should be private.
  • The increased penalties for hacking Obama is proposing could punish people who have only briefly rubbed shoulders with hackers as full-fledged members of a criminal enterprise, and criminalize “white-hat” hacking.
  • And Obama’s federal standards for when companies have to report that customers’ data has been stolen would actually overturn tougher standards in many states.

“There’s nothing that he would propose that would do anything to actually improve cybersecurity,” says Chris Soghoian, the principal technologist at the American Civil Liberties Union. “That’s a problem.”


Apple deleted music from users’ iPods purchased from rivals, court told | Technology | The Guardian

Apple deleted music from users’ iPods purchased from rivals, court told | Technology | The Guardian.

Apple scanned for music purchased from rival services such as Amazon and forced users to delete all music from their iPods, it is claimed

steve jobs with iPod
Apple deliberately forced users to delete music from their iPods if it was bought from rival music services, a court has been told. Photograph: Paul Sakuma/AP

Apple intentionally deleted music not bought from iTunes from users’ iPods between 2007 and 2009, a court was told in a antitrust suit against Apple.

Attorneys representing the plaintiffs in a potentially billion dollar antitrust class-action lawsuit against Apple for abuse of its iTunes Music Store dominance told the jury that the Californian electronics company scanned for music not bought from iTunes, and forced a factory reset of the iPod if any was detected.

“You guys decided to give them the worst possible experience and blow up” a user’s iPod music, attorney Patrick Coughlin told the US District Court in Oakland, California.

‘Very paranoid’

Users who tried to sync and update an iPod with music from the likes of Amazon or 7Digital were told there was an error with their iPod that could only be solved with a factory restore through iTunes, which completely wiped the iPod.

Restoring the iPod from iTunes would not restore music from rival services. Apple decided to “not to tell users the problem” Coughlin explained.

Apple security director Augustin Farrugia told the court that the music was deleted for security reasons and that hackers including Jon Lech Johansen also known as “DVD Jon” and software such as the digital rights management removal tool Requiem had made Apple “very paranoid.”

“Someone is breaking into our house,” Apple’s founder and chief executive Steve Jobs wrote at the time, according to an email exhibited by Apple software head Eddy Cue.

“The system was totally hacked,” said Farrugia and that the music was deleted for security reasons, saying that “we don’t need to give users too much information” because “we don’t want to confuse users.”

Apple declined to comment further.


US cybercrime laws being used to target security researchers | Technology | theguardian.com

US cybercrime laws being used to target security researchers | Technology | theguardian.com.

Security researchers say they have been threatened with indictment for their work investigating internet vulnerabilities

 

 

A hand reaching through a laptop to type on the keyboard
Industry experts are concerned that America’s anti-hacking laws are being applied without proper discretion, leaving security researchers vulnerable to prosecution. Photograph: Epoxydude/fstop/Corbis

 

Some of the world’s best-known security researchers claim to have been threatened with indictment over their efforts to find vulnerabilities in internet infrastructure, amid fears American computer hacking laws are perversely making the web less safe to surf.

Many in the security industry have expressed grave concerns around the application of the US Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA), complaining law enforcement and lawyers have wielded it aggressively at anyone looking for vulnerabilities in the internet, criminalising work that’s largely benign.

They have also argued the law carries overly severe punishments, is too vague and does not consider context, only the action.

HD Moore, creator of the ethical hacking tool Metasploit and chief research officer of security consultancy Rapid7, told the Guardian he had been warned by US law enforcement last year over a scanning project called Critical.IO, which he started in 2012. The initiative sought to find widespread vulnerabilities using automated computer programs to uncover the weaknesses across the entire internet.

‘Law enforcement are killing careers’

Jeremiah Grossman, CEO of cyber research firm Whitehat Security, believes that the aggressive application of the law will lead to researchers quitting before they’ve found serious problems on the internet, leading to a degradation of its overall security.

“Right now they are probably killing careers, because they’re not accounting for intent,” said Grossman.

“The chilling effect is on the problems we don’t know about yet. The canaries in the coalmine? They just killed them all. So now we’re going to suffer the consequences.”


Pekín endurece su protesta contra los cargos de ciberespionaje a militares chinos | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Pekín endurece su protesta contra los cargos de ciberespionaje a militares chinos | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

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China ha convocado al embajador estadounidense en Pekín, Max Baucus, para protestar de manera oficial contra la presentación de cargos por parte de un gran jurado de EEUU contra cinco militares chinos, acusados de ciberespionaje contra empresas del país norteamericano. La reacción del Gobierno chino, al que el anuncio estadounidense sorprendió apenas horas antes de inaugurar en Shanghai un foro de seguridad y cooperación para Asia en el que participan también, entre otros, el presidente ruso Vladímir Putin y el jefe de Estado iraní Hasan Rohaní, no se hizo esperar.

Un comunicado en la página web del Ministerio de Exteriores chino indicaba que el viceministro Zheng Zeguang transmitió a Baucus, quien apenas lleva dos meses en el cargo, la protesta “solemne” de su Gobierno contra una acción que ha perjudicado gravemente los lazos bilaterales y contra la que China puede tomar aún más medidas.

El lunes, Pekín ya había anunciado su retirada del grupo de trabajo China-EEUU para la ciberseguridad

El lunes, Pekín ya había anunciado su retirada del grupo de trabajo China-EEUU para la ciberseguridad. En Washington, el embajador chino también transmitía un mensaje similar a las autoridades estadounidenses. Por su parte, el Ministerio de Defensa chino rechazaba tajantemente las acusaciones contra sus militares y acusaba, en un comunicado de su portavoz Geng Yansheng, a EEUU de “hipocresía y doble rasero”.

“Desde hace largo tiempo, las autoridades de EEUU utilizan una tecnología e infraestructura avanzadas para llevar a cabo ciberespionaje y tareas de vigilancia sobre dignatarios y empresas extranjeras”, señala el comunicado del Ministerio de Defensa, que alude a los cables diplomáticos filtrados por Wikileaks y a las denuncias deEdward Snowden. El ex contratista de los servicios de seguridad estadounidenses ha asegurado, entre otras cosas, que EEUU entró en los ordenadores de Huawei, el gigante de las telecomunicaciones chino al que Washington acusa, sin haberlo probado aún, de mantener vínculos con el Ejército Popular de Liberación chino. Las terminales de los ordenadores militares chinos, asegura Geng, han sufrido un alto número de ciberataques provenientes del extranjero, de los cuales una cifra “considerable” provienen de EEUU.


Is Revealing Secrets Akin to Drunk Driving? Intelligence Official Says So – The Intercept

Is Revealing Secrets Akin to Drunk Driving? Intelligence Official Says So – The Intercept.

By 

The intelligence community’s top lawyer on Friday defended the Obama administration’s hostility toward revelations of national security secrets — and likened the act of publishing them to drunk driving.

Robert Litt, general counsel to the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, used the drunk-driving analogy to excuse his inability to cite any specific harm to individuals by news stories based on leaks from former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

“We ban drunk driving in this country,” Litt asserted, arguing on a panel with four top news editors that not every crime has an identifiable victim.

Litt made the same argument earlier this week, at an event in Washington for Sunshine Week:  ”Not every drunk driver causes a fatal accident, but we ban drunk driving because it increases the risk of accidents.  In the same way, we classify information because of the risk of harm, even if no harm actually can be shown in the end from any particular disclosure.”

But Litt’s analogy  did not go over well with the other members of the panel on Friday. New Yorker editor David Remnick fired back, incredulously: “Is journalism drunk driving??”

Remnick said that by Litt’s logic, any reporting on leaked material would cause damage. “Your balance is we do nothing,” he said.

Litt, who has become the point person for the administration’s defense of its surveillance programs, was speaking at a journalistic symposium on  Secrets and Sources in the New York Times  auditorium. He responded combatively to the event’s main theme: the importance of holding the government accountable.

“There ought to be an adversarial approach between the press and the government,” Litt said. “But,” he added with a touch of menace, ”it’s a two-way process.”