With the latest WikiLeaks revelations about the CIA – is privacy really dead? | World news | The Guardian

Both the Snowden revelations and the CIA leak highlight the variety of creative techniques intelligence agencies can use to spy on individuals, at a time when many of us are voluntarily giving up our personal data to private companies and installing so-called “smart” devices with microphones (smart TVs, Amazon Echo) in our homes.So, where does this leave us? Is privacy really dead, as Silicon Valley luminaries such as Mark Zuckerberg have previously declared?

Fuente: With the latest WikiLeaks revelations about the CIA – is privacy really dead? | World news | The Guardian


Adult Friend Finder and Penthouse hacked in largest personal data breach on record

Over 412m accounts from pornography sites and sex hookup service reportedly leaked as Friend Finder Networks suffers second hack in just over a year

Fuente: Adult Friend Finder and Penthouse hacked in largest personal data breach on record


DDoS attack that disrupted internet was largest of its kind in history, experts say | Technology | The Guardian

The cyber-attack that brought down much of America’s internet last week was caused by a new weapon called the Mirai botnet and was likely the largest of its kind in history, experts said.

Fuente: DDoS attack that disrupted internet was largest of its kind in history, experts say | Technology | The Guardian


Spies for Hire

While cybersecurity companies traditionally aim to ensure that the code in software and hardware is free of flaws — mistakes that malicious hackers can take advantage of — DarkMatter, according to sources familiar with the company’s activities, was trying to find and exploit these flaws in order to install malware. DarkMatter could take over a nearby surveillance camera or cellphone and basically do whatever it wanted with it — conduct surveillance, interfere with or change any electronic messages it emitted, or block the signals entirely.

Fuente: Spies for Hire


Ex-Yahoo Employee: Government Spy Program Could Have Given a Hacker Access to All Email

Contrary to a denial by Yahoo and a report by the New York Times, the company’s scanning program, revealed earlier this week by Reuters, provided the government with a custom-built back door into the company’s mail service — and it was so sloppily installed that it posed a privacy hazard for hundreds of millions of users, according to a former Yahoo employee with knowledge of the company’s security practices.

Fuente: Ex-Yahoo Employee: Government Spy Program Could Have Given a Hacker Access to All Email


Israeli firm accused of creating iPhone spyware | World news | The Guardian

An Israeli technology company has been accused of creating and supplying an aggressive interception program capable of taking over Apple’s iPhones and turning them into remote spying devices, after it was allegedly used to target a Middle Eastern human rights activist and others.

Fuente: Israeli firm accused of creating iPhone spyware | World news | The Guardian


The Vigilante Who Hacked Hacking Team Explains How He Did It | Motherboard

Back in July of last year, the controversial government spying and hacking tool seller Hacking Team was hacked itself by an outside attacker. The breach made headlines worldwide, but no one knew much about the perpetrator or how he did it.That mystery has finally been revealed.

Fuente: The Vigilante Who Hacked Hacking Team Explains How He Did It | Motherboard


The CIA Is Investing in Firms That Mine Your Tweets and Instagram Photos

SOFT ROBOTS THAT can grasp delicate objects, computer algorithms designed to spot an “insider threat,” and artificial intelligence that will sift through large data sets — these are just a few of the technologies being pursued by companies with investment from In-Q-Tel, the CIA’s venture capital firm, according to a document obtained by The Intercept.

Fuente: The CIA Is Investing in Firms That Mine Your Tweets and Instagram Photos


Forget Apple's fight with the FBI – our privacy catastrophe has only just begun | Technology | The Guardian

The privacy crisis is a disaster of our own making – and now the tech firms who gathered our data are trying to make money out of privacy

Fuente: Forget Apple’s fight with the FBI – our privacy catastrophe has only just begun | Technology | The Guardian


Regulators are failing to block fraudulent adverts – FT.com

You might have thought that an industry in which a tenth of transactions are fraudulent, which leaks billions of dollars a year, and in which many turn a blind eye to criminality would be raided by the police. So far, there is no sign of it. The

Fuente: Regulators are failing to block fraudulent adverts – FT.com


Apple's Tim Cook defends encryption. When will other tech CEOs do so? | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian

More high-profile titans need to use their platforms to make crystal clear how important encryption is to users everywhere

Fuente: Apple’s Tim Cook defends encryption. When will other tech CEOs do so? | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian


Apple believes bill creates ‘key under doormat for bad guys’ – FT.com

Shortly after Theresa May introduced the draft Investigatory Powers bill in November to update the UK’s surveillance laws for the internet age, the home secretary met privately with Tim Cook, Apple’s chief executive. He laid out a number of

Fuente: Apple believes bill creates ‘key under doormat for bad guys’ – FT.com


Third-party Snapchat site claims pics were hacked from server | Technology | theguardian.com

Third-party Snapchat site claims pics were hacked from server | Technology | theguardian.com.

Developers behind Snapsaved.com, which stores Snapchat pictures, claim user photos were stolen – while another claim the site’s administrator gave access to hackers

The Snapchat logo: third-party sites have been hacked to reveal images that were meant to self-destruct.
The Snapchat logo: third-party sites have been hacked to reveal images that were meant to self-destruct. Photograph: Peter Byrne/PA

The owners of the Snapsaved site, from which a number of photos sent over the Snapchat service were leaked at the weekend, say that they were hacked to reveal the pictures.

The statement follows a claim by an unknown person who says that the photos which leaked out on Sunday were provided by the site’s administrator.

They also say that the distribution of the photos would be potentially harmful both to those pictured and to the wider internet because of its effects on personal privacy.

On Sunday, thousands of photos and videos from the Snapchat service were put online, apparently taken from sites including Snapsaved.com, which had allowed people to log in using their Snapchat username and password to offer desktop-based rather than handset-based access to the site – and also the chance to store photos, which are meant to be deleted within seconds of being viewed.

Snapchat blamed third-party apps, without naming Snapsaved, for the breach.

In a Facebook posting, an unnamed spokesman for the Snapsaved site says that “I would like to inform the public that snapsaved.com was hacked” due to a mistake in the setup of its web server. “As soon as we discovered the breach in our systems, we immediately deleted the entire website and the database associated with it,” the unsigned statement continues. “As far as we can tell, the breach has effected [sic] 500MB of images, and 0 personal information from the database.”

The rebuttal comes after another anonymous claim, made via a posting on the Pastebin site – commonly used by hackers to post claims and conquests – that the administrator of Snapsaved had provided one or more hackers with a way to browse the content on the site.

“The content released from this site was provided to us by the administrator of the site,” the writer claimed. “Users could freely browse all media on this website, and view as per user account.


México y Bahréin comparten equipo de espionaje informático

México y Bahréin comparten equipo de espionaje informático.

Espionaje político en la UE. Foto: AP
Espionaje político en la UE.
Foto: AP

BRUSELAS (apro).- El mismo equipo de espionaje informático que adquirió el gobierno del presidente Felipe Calderón, y que ha continuado en servicio bajo el gobierno de Enrique Peña Nieto, lo ha utilizado el régimen autoritario de Bahréin para intervenir las computadoras de activistas de derechos humanos, abogados y periodistas opositores.

Se trata del programa espía FinFisher, o FinSpy, que produce la compañía británica Gamma International y que vende sólo a instituciones gubernamentales para, supuestamente, perseguir criminales y terroristas.

Tal empresa enfrenta una queja ante la Organización para la Cooperación y el Desarrollo Económico (OCDE) –a la cual pertenece México—que interpuso en febrero de 2013 un grupo de organizaciones de derechos humanos basadas en Gran Bretaña. Encabezadas por Privacy International, acusan a Gamma International por violar las directrices corporativas de ese organismo en materia de derechos humanos al exportar su programa espía a Bahréin para vigilar a la oposición.


Has the NSA’s mass spying made life easier for digital criminals? | Technology | theguardian.com

Has the NSA’s mass spying made life easier for digital criminals? | Technology | theguardian.com.

In flooding the internet with malware, and by increasing wariness of data sharing, the NSA’s actions have had a negative impact on the fight against cybercrime

A man hands out 'RSA sold us out' ribbons near Moscone West for the badges of people attending the RSA conference.
A man hands out ‘RSA sold us out’ protest ribbons near Moscone West to people attending the RSA conference. Photograph: Steve Rhodes/Demotix/Corbis

Thousands of the world’s security professionals, mostly of them middle-aged white males, gathered in San Francisco last week for the annual RSA Conference.

Traditionally, it’s the time of year vendors hawk their gear in halls containing a perturbing whiff of ammonia, research announcements provide relief from the festival of commerce, and government mandarins hobnob with corporate types – all with the implied intent to work together to protect people’s data.

Yet 2014’s event was always going to be a bit different. RSA, the security company hosting the event, had to defend itself against criticism over an alleged $10m deal with the National Security Agency (NSA) to include flawed encryption in its products.

The company’s chief, Art Coviello, outright denied any wrongdoing, saying RSA was only following advice given by the US government’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

RSA’s excuses have convinced some onlookers, others remain sceptical. But the organisation that took far more flak this week was the NSA itself, which had its own booth on the trade floor, albeit a considerably plainer one than the surrounding neon-clad stalls of commercial firms.

There was one criticism, amid the understandable ire around the damage done to global privacy, which stood out: that the NSA’s mass spying had perversely made life easier for digital criminals.

Data sharing in danger

Cross-border data-sharing mechanisms – a critical part in both online and non-internet crime investigations – have come under threat since the Edward Snowden leaks. Even though information-sharing deals covering banking and airline passenger data just about survived calls to suspend them, the Snowden files have caused problems for collaboration between public and private bodies.

The heightened tensions lie not between law enforcement agencies, but between police and other organisations that potentially hold valuable information for investigations. “The impact is more [with] third parties giving more consideration to sharing their data with agencies or other departments,” said Charlie McMurdie, formerly the head of the defunct Metropolitan Police Central e-Crime Unit and now senior crime adviser at PricewaterhouseCoopers.

“This can have a negative impact on law enforcement ability to respond to or progress investigations, but on the positive side [this] has also made third parties think more about where their data exists, security and sharing protocols, which isn’t a bad thing.”

A recent European Commission report on trust between the US and the EU following the leaks last year said: “Information sharing is … an essential component of EU-US security cooperation, critically important to the common goal of preventing and combating serious crime and terrorism. However, recent revelations about US intelligence collection programmes have negatively affected the trust on which this cooperation is based. In particular, it has affected trust in the way personal data is processed.”

Discussions are ongoing about an umbrella agreement covering law enforcement data sharing, with much talk of the need to ensure safeguards are in place, with “strict conditions”.

The US government has already seen the impact. In response to a Guardian question on the effect of Snowden’s revelations on data sharing, Phyllis Schneck, the chief cybersecurity official at the US Department of Homeland Security, said the government body’s partners were “feeling it”.