How old do you look? I wouldn’t ask the internet | Tim Dowling | Opinion | The Guardian

The how-old.net website – which uses photos to judge your age – didn’t work for me. For women and refugees, of course, there’s the Daily Mail

Fuente: How old do you look? I wouldn’t ask the internet | Tim Dowling | Opinion | The Guardian


“La ciberguerra sería una forma de terrorismo de Estado”

El libro pretende incentivar la mirada crítica entre el gran público ante los acontecimientos calificados de “ciberguerra” y alertar de la coartada que puede proporcionar el tremendismo sensacionalista en estos temas a quienes pretenden recortar libertades o privacidad.

Fuente: “La ciberguerra sería una forma de terrorismo de Estado”


Don’t break crypto, go easy on the algorithms—global Internet commission | Ars Technica UK

Crypto backdoors, the overuse of opaque algorithms, turning companies into law enforcement agencies, and online attacks on critical infrastructure have all been attacked by the Global Commission on Internet Governance in a new report published on Wednesday.

Fuente: Don’t break crypto, go easy on the algorithms—global Internet commission | Ars Technica UK


Apple and Google 'FREAK attack' leaves millions of users vulnerable to hackers | Technology | The Guardian

Apple and Google ‘FREAK attack’ leaves millions of users vulnerable to hackers | Technology | The Guardian.

The Apple logo inside an Apple store in Tokyo. The company is working to fix a potential security issue which could leave devices vulnerable to hackers. The Apple logo inside an Apple store in Tokyo. The company is working to fix a potential security issue which could leave devices vulnerable to hackers. Photograph: Yuya Shino/Reuters

Millions of people may have been left vulnerable to hackers while surfing the web on Apple and Google devices, thanks to a newly discovered security flaw known as “FREAK attack.”

There’s no evidence so far that any hackers have exploited the weakness, which companies are now moving to repair. Researchers blame the problem on an old government policy, abandoned over a decade ago, which required US software makers to use weaker security in encryption programs sold overseas due to national security concerns.

Many popular websites and some internet browsers continued to accept the weaker software, or can be tricked into using it, according to experts at several research institutions who reported their findings Tuesday.

They said that could make it easier for hackers to break the encryption that’s supposed to prevent digital eavesdropping when a visitor types sensitive information into a website.

About a third of all encrypted websites were vulnerable as of Tuesday, including sites operated by American Express, Groupon, Kohl’s, Marriott and some government agencies, the researchers said.


EE.UU. ‘quebrantó’ las redes informáticas de Corea del Norte en 2010 – El Mostrador

EE.UU. ‘quebrantó’ las redes informáticas de Corea del Norte en 2010 – El Mostrador.

La Agencia de Seguridad Nacional logró romper las barreras informáticas en 2010 y entrar en los sistemas norcoreanos a través de las redes chinas que conectan a este país con el resto del mundo.

eeuucoreadelnorte

Estados Unidos “quebrantó” las redes informáticas de Corea del Norte en 2010 y por eso supo que el país estaba detrás del ataque a Sony Pictures, reportaron The New York Times y Der Spiegel.

Corea del Norte dedicó dos meses a entrar en los sistemas de Sony después de que la empresa anunciara sus planes para producir una comedia sobre el asesinato del líder de este país, titulada “The Interview”.

La Agencia de Seguridad Nacional logró romper las barreras informáticas en 2010 y entrar en los sistemas norcoreanos a través de las redes chinas que conectan a este país con el resto del mundo.

Corea del Norte ha negado repetidamente su responsabilidad en el ciberataque contra Sony.


Global police operation disrupts aggressive Cryptolocker virus | Technology | theguardian.com

Global police operation disrupts aggressive Cryptolocker virus | Technology | theguardian.com.

UK botnet victims have two weeks to escape clutches of invasive ransomware after global cybercrime operation

 

 

Cryptolocker will encrypt files with a public key that is widely seen as unbreakable.
Cryptolocker will encrypt files with a public key that is widely seen as unbreakable.

 

The FBI and crime agencies from across the globe have temporarily disrupted one of the most aggressive computer viruses ever seen, but are warning victims they have two weeks to protect their computers before the hackers seize it back.

Digital police from across the globe have claimed success in disrupting the criminal operation behind the ransomware, known as Cryptolocker.

The UK’s National Crime Agency (NCA) has told British victims that they have a two-week window to protect themselves, after working with the FBI, Europol and other law enforcement bodies to temporarily seize control of the global network of infected computers.

Cryptolocker is now disabled, but the NCA said it was a race against time before the hackers circumvent their block on it.

It follows one of the biggest ever international collaborations between the major crime agencies to prevent a virus of this magnitude.

The Cryptolocker software locked PC users out of their machines, encrypting all their files and demanding payment of one Bitcoin (currently worth around £300) for decryption.

The FBI estimates that the virus has already acquired $27m (£17m) in ransom payments in just the first two months of its life, and that it has infected more than 234,000 machines.