FBI’s Secret Surveillance Tech Budget Is ‘Hundreds of Millions’

The FBI has “hundreds of millions of dollars” to spend on developing technology for use in both national security and domestic law enforcement investigations — but it won’t reveal the exact amount.

Fuente: FBI’s Secret Surveillance Tech Budget Is ‘Hundreds of Millions’


Swift: fraudulent messages sent over international bank transfer system | Technology | The Guardian

World money exchange tells 11,000 financial institutions to update their software after US$81m was stolen from account of Bangladesh central bank

Fuente: Swift: fraudulent messages sent over international bank transfer system | Technology | The Guardian


The CIA Is Investing in Firms That Mine Your Tweets and Instagram Photos

SOFT ROBOTS THAT can grasp delicate objects, computer algorithms designed to spot an “insider threat,” and artificial intelligence that will sift through large data sets — these are just a few of the technologies being pursued by companies with investment from In-Q-Tel, the CIA’s venture capital firm, according to a document obtained by The Intercept.

Fuente: The CIA Is Investing in Firms That Mine Your Tweets and Instagram Photos


Apple Macs targeted by KeRanger ransomware for first time | Technology | The Guardian

Apple customers were targeted by hackers over the weekend in the first campaign against Macintosh computers using a pernicious type of software known as ransomware, researchers with Palo Alto Networks have revealed.Ransomware, one of the fastest-growing types of cyber threats, encrypts data on infected machines, then typically asks users to pay ransoms in hard-to-trace digital currencies to get an electronic key so they can retrieve their data.

Fuente: Apple Macs targeted by KeRanger ransomware for first time | Technology | The Guardian


Regulators are failing to block fraudulent adverts – FT.com

You might have thought that an industry in which a tenth of transactions are fraudulent, which leaks billions of dollars a year, and in which many turn a blind eye to criminality would be raided by the police. So far, there is no sign of it. The

Fuente: Regulators are failing to block fraudulent adverts – FT.com


Cae una red de fraude cibernético infiltrada en ordenadores de 12 países | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Cae una red de fraude cibernético infiltrada en ordenadores de 12 países | Internacional | EL PAÍS.


El departamento de Justicia de EE UU anunció este lunes la operación. / REUTERS

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Una investigación internacional liderada por el FBI ha permitido desmantelar una red de fraude cibernético en 12 países que había robado más de 100 millones de dólares. Las autoridades estadounidenses anunciaron este lunes que se trata del “más sofisticado¨ sistema de infiltración remota de piratas informáticos que el FBI ha desarticulado e identificaron a un ciudadano ruso como el líder de la trama.

Tras esta operación, Evgeniy Bogachev, de 30 años, fue incorporado a la lista del FBI de cibercriminales más buscados. Dado que Rusia no extradita a otros países a sus ciudadanos acusados, es posible que Bogachev nunca llegue a ser detenido. Y con la tensión actual entre Washington y Moscú, a raíz de la crisis ucrania, parece muy improbable cualquier gesto conciliador de Rusia. Consciente de estas limitaciones, el anuncio de su identidad responde a la nueva estrategia de Washington de revelar abiertamente a sus piratas informáticos más buscados, como ya hizo hace dos semanas al acusar a cinco militares chinos de ciberespionaje industrial.

La red conocida como Gameover Zeus logró infectar a entre medio millón y un millón de ordenadores en distintas partes del mundo mediante dos programas con los que robaban credenciales bancarias para posteriormente “vaciar las cuentas” de sus usuarios, y después chantajear a sus propietarios para que pagaran una fianza a cambio de devolverles los datos sustraídos.

El sistema era de tal sofisticación que permitía a los hackers “infiltrarse, espiar e incluso controlar” los ordenadores infectados “desde cualquier lugar”, según la investigación del FBI. “Implementaron el tipo de cibercrímenes que no te creerías si los vieras en una película de ciencia ficción”, dijo el vicefiscal general, Leslie Caldwell, en una rueda de prensa en la sede del departamento de Justicia en Washington.


Yahoo malware turned European computers into bitcoin slaves | Technology | theguardian.com

Yahoo malware turned European computers into bitcoin slaves | Technology | theguardian.com.

Search firm remains silent on how its ad servers infected Windows PCs of visitors to homepage

Yahoo! President and CEO Marissa Mayer delivers a keynote address at the 2014 International CES at The Las Vegas Hotel & Casino on January 7, 2014 in Las Vegas, Nevada.
Yahoo! President and CEO Marissa Mayer delivers a keynote address at the 2014 International CES at The Las Vegas Hotel & Casino on January 7, 2014 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Photograph: Ethan Miller/Getty Images

As many as two million European users of Yahoo may have received PC malware from virus-laden ads served by its homepage over a four-day period last week.

Some of the malware would turn PCs into bitcoin miners – a huge drain on its computing resources – without users’ knowledge. Yahoo has been criticised for not saying how many people could be affected or doing anything to help those with the malware, which attacked flaws in Java modules on systems.

In a statement, Yahoo said: “From December 31 to January 3 on our European sites, we served some advertisements that did not meet our editorial guidelines – specifically, they spread malware.” Users in North America, Asia Pacific and Latin America weren’t affected, Yahoo said. Nor were users of Apple Macs or mobile devices.

“We will continue to monitor and block any advertisements being used for this activity,” the company added. “We will post more information for our users shortly.”

According to Light Cyber, a security research firm which warned Yahoo of the attacks in late December, one of the malware programs delivered in the attack turned the victim’s computer into a bitcoin miner. The computer is set to work performing the calculations required to make the bitcoin network run, but the rewards for doing so accrue to the malware writer.

Yahoo has been criticised for not doing more to aid users infected by the faulty adverts. Dan Farber of technology site CNET says that: “At this point, Yahoo hasn’t addressed any of the details, such as how the malware exploit got into its Web pages, how many users are impacted, and what victims of the attack should do. The company may still be gathering data.”