Digital gold: why hackers love Bitcoin | Technology | The Guardian

The WannaCry ransomware attackers demanded payment in the cryptocurrency. But its use in the ‘clean’ economy is growing, too, and could revolutionise how we use money

Fuente: Digital gold: why hackers love Bitcoin | Technology | The Guardian


The U.S. Government Thinks Thousands of Russian Hackers May Be Reading My Blog. They Aren’t.

It’s plausible, and in my opinion likely, that hackers under orders from the Russian government were responsible for the DNC and Podesta hacks in order to influence the U.S. election in favor of Donald Trump. But the Grizzly Steppe report fails to adequately back up this claim. My research, for example, shows that much of the evidence presented is evidence of nothing at all.

Fuente: The U.S. Government Thinks Thousands of Russian Hackers May Be Reading My Blog. They Aren’t.


WashPost Is Richly Rewarded for False News About Russia Threat While Public Is Deceived

The most ironic aspect of all this is that it is mainstream journalists — the very people who have become obsessed with the crusade against Fake News — who play the key role in enabling and fueling this dissemination of false stories. They do so not only by uncritically spreading them, but also by taking little or no steps to notify the public of their falsity.

Fuente: WashPost Is Richly Rewarded for False News About Russia Threat While Public Is Deceived


Russia Hysteria Infects WashPost Again: False Story About Hacking U.S. Electric Grid

Those interested in a sober and rational discussion of the Russia hacking issue should read the following:(1) Three posts by cybersecurity expert Jeffrey Carr: first, on the difficulty of proving attribution for any hacks; second, on the irrational claims on which the “Russia hacked the DNC” case is predicated; and third, on the woefully inadequate, evidence-free report issued by the Department of Homeland Security and FBI this week to justify sanctions against Russia.(2) Yesterday’s Rolling Stone article by Matt Taibbi, who lived and worked for more than a decade in Russia, titled: “Something About This Russia Story Stinks.”(3) An Atlantic article by David A. Graham on the politics and strategies of the sanctions imposed this week on Russia by Obama; I disagree with several of his claims, but the article is a rarity: a calm, sober, rational assessment of this debate.

Fuente: Russia Hysteria Infects WashPost Again: False Story About Hacking U.S. Electric Grid


Yahoo faces questions over delay in data breach revelation – FT.com

ft.com > Companies >TechnologySubscribe Sign in Home World Companies Energy Financials Health Industrials Luxury 360 Media Retail & Consumer Tech Telecoms Transport By Region Tools Markets Global Economy Lex Comment Work & Careers Life & Arts Try the new FT.comLast updated: September 23, 2016 11:59 pmYahoo faces questions over delay in data breach revelationNic Fildes and Madhumita Murgia in London, Tim Bradshaw in San Francisco Share Print Clip Commentsepa05552696 The Yahoo logo is pictured on a computer monitor in Taipei, Taiwan, 23 September 2016. According to news reports on 23 September, around 500 million Yahoo account users information had been stolen or hacked on its network in 2014. EPA/RITCHIE B. TONGO©EPAYahoo chief executive Marissa Mayer and her board are facing serious questions over the handling of the largest-ever cyber attack recorded, as customers, regulators and even its new owners search for answers on why a two-year-old data breach has only just come to light.

Fuente: Yahoo faces questions over delay in data breach revelation – FT.com


Regulators are failing to block fraudulent adverts – FT.com

You might have thought that an industry in which a tenth of transactions are fraudulent, which leaks billions of dollars a year, and in which many turn a blind eye to criminality would be raided by the police. So far, there is no sign of it. The

Fuente: Regulators are failing to block fraudulent adverts – FT.com


New smoking gun further ties NSA to omnipotent “Equation Group” hackers | Ars Technica

New smoking gun further ties NSA to omnipotent “Equation Group” hackers | Ars Technica.

What are the chances unrelated state-sponsored projects were both named “BACKSNARF”?

 

 

 

Researchers from Moscow-based Kaspersky Lab have uncovered more evidence tying the US National Security Agency to a nearly omnipotent group of hackers who operated undetected for at least 14 years.

 

The Kaspersky researchers once again stopped short of saying the hacking collective they dubbed Equation Group was the handiwork of the NSA, saying only that the operation had to have been sponsored by a nation-state with nearly unlimited resources to dedicate to the project. Still, they heaped new findings on top of a mountain of existing evidence that already strongly implicated the spy agency. The strongest new tie to the NSA was the string “BACKSNARF_AB25” discovered only a few days ago embedded in a newly found sample of the Equation Group espionage platform dubbed “EquationDrug.” “BACKSNARF,” according to page 19 of this undated NSA presentation, was the name of a project tied to the NSA’s Tailored Access Operations.


Western Spy Agencies Secretly Rely on Hackers for Intel and Expertise – The Intercept

Western Spy Agencies Secretly Rely on Hackers for Intel and Expertise – The Intercept.

Featured photo - Western Spy Agencies Secretly Rely on Hackers for Intel and Expertise

The U.S., U.K. and Canadian governments characterize hackers as a criminal menace, warn of the threats they allegedly pose to critical infrastructure, and aggressively prosecute them, but they are also secretly exploiting their information and expertise, according to top secret documents.

In some cases, the surveillance agencies are obtaining the content of emails by monitoring hackers as they breach email accounts, often without notifying the hacking victims of these breaches. “Hackers are stealing the emails of some of our targets… by collecting the hackers’ ‘take,’ we . . .  get access to the emails themselves,” reads one top secret 2010 National Security Agency document.

These and other revelations about the intelligence agencies’ reliance on hackers are contained in documents provided by whistleblower Edward Snowden. The documents—which come from the U.K. Government Communications Headquarters agency and NSA—shed new light on the various means used by intelligence agencies to exploit hackers’ successes and learn from their skills, while also raising questions about whether governments have overstated the threat posed by some hackers.

By looking out for hacking conducted “both by state-sponsored and freelance hackers” and riding on the coattails of hackers, Western intelligence agencies have gathered what they regard as valuable content:

Recently, Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC) and Menwith Hill Station (MHS) discovered and began exploiting a target-rich data set being stolen by hackers. The hackers’ sophisticated email-stealing intrusion set is known as INTOLERANT. Of the traffic observed, nearly half contains category hits because the attackers are targeting email accounts of interest to the Intelligence Community. Although a relatively new data source, [Target Offices of Primary Interest] have already written multiple reports based on INTOLERANT collect.

The hackers targeted a wide range of diplomatic corps, human rights and democracy activists and even journalists:

INTOLERANT traffic is very organized. Each event is labeled to identify and categorize victims. Cyber attacks commonly apply descriptors to each victim – it helps herd victims and track which attacks succeed and which fail. Victim categories make INTOLERANT interesting:

A = Indian Diplomatic & Indian Navy
B = Central Asian diplomatic
C = Chinese Human Rights Defenders
D = Tibetan Pro-Democracy Personalities
E = Uighur Activists
F = European Special Rep to Afghanistan and Indian photo-journalism
G = Tibetan Government in Exile

In those cases, the NSA and its partner agencies in the United Kingdom and Canada were unable to determine the identity of the hackers who collected the data, but suspect a state sponsor “based on the level of sophistication and the victim set.”


How you could become a victim of cybercrime in 2015 | Technology | The Guardian

How you could become a victim of cybercrime in 2015 | Technology | The Guardian.

Cybersecurity experts’ predictions for the year ahead: from ransomware and healthcare hacks to social media scams and state-sponsored cyberwar

Will 2015 be a happy new year for cybercriminals?
 Will 2015 be a happy new year for cybercriminals? Photograph: Alamy

Will 2015 be a happy new year for internet users? Not if cybercriminals have their way.

Online security companies have been making their predictions for 2015, from the malware that will be trying to weasel its way onto our computers and smartphones to the prospect of cyberwar involving state-sponsored hackers.

Here’s a summary of what you should be watching out for online in 2015, based on the predictions of companies including BitDefender, KPMGAdaptiveMobile,Trend MicroBAE SystemsWebSenseInfoSec InstituteSymantecKaspersky,Proofpoint and Sophos. The links lead to their full predictions.


You Can Get Hacked Just By Watching This Cat Video on YouTube – The Intercept

You Can Get Hacked Just By Watching This Cat Video on YouTube – The Intercept.

By 190

Many otherwise well-informed people think they have to do something wrong, or stupid, or insecure to get hacked—like clicking on the wrong attachments, or browsing malicious websites. People also think that the NSA and its international partners are the only ones who have turned the internet into a militarized zone. But according to research I am releasing today at the Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, many of these commonly held beliefs are not necessarily true. The only thing you need to do to render your computer’s secrets—your private conversations, banking information, photographs—transparent to prying eyes is watch a cute cat video on YouTube, and catch the interest of a nation-state or law enforcement agency that has $1 million or so to spare.

To understand why, you have to realize that even in today’s increasingly security-conscious internet, much of the traffic is still unencrypted. You might be surprised to learn that even popular sites that advertise their use of encryption frequently still serve some unencrypted content or advertisements. While people now recognize that unencrypted traffic can be monitored, they may not recognize that it also serves as a direct path into compromising their computers.

Companies such as Hacking Team and FinFisher sell devices called “network injection appliances.” These are racks of physical machines deployed inside internet service providers around the world, which allow for the simple exploitation of targets. In order to do this, they inject malicious content into people’s everyday internet browsing traffic. One way that Hacking Team accomplishes this is by taking advantage of unencrypted YouTube video streams to compromise users. The Hacking Team device targets a user, waits for that user to watch a YouTube clip like the one above, and intercepts that traffic and replaces it with malicious code that gives the operator total control over the target’s computer without his or her knowledge. The machine also exploits Microsoft’s login.live.com web site in the same manner.

Fortunately for their users, both Google and Microsoft were responsive when alerted that commercial tools were being used to exploit their services, and have taken steps to close the vulnerability by encrypting all targeted traffic. There are, however, many other vectors for companies like Hacking Team and FinFisher to exploit.

In today’s internet, there are few excuses for any company to serve content unencrypted. Anyunencrypted traffic can be maliciously tampered with in a manner that is invisible to the average user. The only way to solve this problem is for web providers to offer fully encrypted services.


Hacking Online Polls and Other Ways British Spies Seek to Control the Internet – The Intercept

Hacking Online Polls and Other Ways British Spies Seek to Control the Internet – The Intercept.

By 390
Featured photo - Hacking Online Polls and Other Ways British Spies Seek to Control the Internet

The secretive British spy agency GCHQ has developed covert tools to seed the internet with false information, including the ability to manipulate the results of online polls, artificially inflate pageview counts on web sites, “amplif[y]” sanctioned messages on YouTube, and censor video content judged to be “extremist.” The capabilities, detailed in documents provided by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, even include an old standby for pre-adolescent prank callers everywhere: A way to connect two unsuspecting phone users together in a call.

The tools were created by GCHQ’s Joint Threat Research Intelligence Group (JTRIG), and constitute some of the most startling methods of propaganda and internet deception contained within the Snowden archive. Previously disclosed documents have detailed JTRIG’s use of “fake victim blog posts,” “false flag operations,” “honey traps” and psychological manipulation to target online activists, monitor visitors to WikiLeaks, and spy on YouTube and Facebook users.

But as the U.K. Parliament today debates a fast-tracked bill to provide the government with greater surveillance powers, one which Prime Minister David Cameron has justified as an “emergency” to “help keep us safe,” a newly released top-secret GCHQ document called “JTRIG Tools and Techniques” provides a comprehensive, birds-eye view of just how underhanded and invasive this unit’s operations are. The document—available in full here—is designed to notify other GCHQ units of JTRIG’s “weaponised capability” when it comes to the dark internet arts, and serves as a sort of hacker’s buffet for wreaking online havoc.


Hackers iraníes utilizan cuentas falsas de Facebook para espiar en EE.UU. e Israel – ABC.es

Hackers iraníes utilizan cuentas falsas de Facebook para espiar en EE.UU. e Israel – ABC.es.

Los piratas crearon seis identidades que parecían trabajar para una página web de noticias falsa, NewsOnAir.org. La camapa de ciberespionaje se prolongó durante tres años

En una campaña de ciberespionaje sin precedentes de tres años, los piratas informáticos iraníes crearon falsas cuentas de redes sociales y una página web para espiar a líderes políticos y militares en Estados Unidos, Israel y otros países, según ha informado este jueves una empresa de inteligencia.

ISight Partners, que descubrió las operaciones, ha señalado que entre los objetivos de los hackers había un almirante de la Armada estadounidense, abogados y embajadores, miembros de grupos de presión de Estados Unidos e Israel y personal en Reino Unido, Arabia Saudí, Siria, Irak y Afganistán.

La empresa ha rechazado identificar a las víctimas y ha dicho que no diría qué datos fueron robados por los piratas, que buscaban credenciales para acceder a redes del Gobierno y corporativas, así como infectar computadoras con software malicioso.

«Si ha funcionado tanto tiempo, entonces tuvieron éxito claramente», ha subrayado la vicepresidenta ejecutiva de iSight, Tiffany Jones, a Reuters. La empresa privada tiene sede en Dallas, Texas, y da información sobre ciberamenazas.


Arrestan a “súper hacker” líder de red de fraude informático en Argentina – BioBioChile

Arrestan a “súper hacker” líder de red de fraude informático en Argentina – BioBioChile.

Publicado por Francisca Rivas | La Información es de Agencia AFPArchivo | Felipe Fredes | Agencia UNO

Archivo | Felipe Fredes | Agencia UNO

Un hacker de 19 años fue detenido en Buenos Aires, acusado de liderar una banda especializada en fraude informático y triangulaciones financieras a través de webs de juegos por internet y de transferencia de dinero, informó este viernes el ministerio de Seguridad argentino.

“La Policía Federal detuvo a un joven súper hacker, líder de una red integrada por siete personas y especializado en fraudes electrónicos trasnacionales y complejas triangulaciones de financieras que concretaba vulnerando la seguridad de varias webs de transferencia de dinero y juegos por internet”, informó un comunicado de prensa.

Los peritos trabajan con la hipótesis de que el joven desviaba a su favor cerca de 50.000 dólares por mes en una cuenta en la cuidad de Rosario, 310 km al norte, según una fuente policial.

El joven, hijo de un ingeniero en sistemas informáticos, fue detenido en su casa en el céntrico barrio porteño de San Cristóbal, en el marco del “Operativo Zombie”, que incluyó cinco allanamientos en Rosario y Buenos Aires.