Cómo los tentáculos de Facebook se extienden más allá de lo que crees – El Mostrador

Es una de las corporaciones más poderosas del mundo y una investigación para entender mejor su estructura social y sus relaciones de poder muestra que “estamos trabajando para Facebook”.

Fuente: Cómo los tentáculos de Facebook se extienden más allá de lo que crees – El Mostrador


El académico que cree que hay que terminar con el “monopolio de Google” (y hacerlo rápido) – El Mostrador

Las grandes empresas tecnológicas como Google, Facebook y Amazon actúan prácticamente como monopolios. Así lo considera el académico Jonathan Taplin, quien advierte de los riesgos de prolongar esta situación, también para la democracia. BBC Mundo habló con él.

Fuente: El académico que cree que hay que terminar con el “monopolio de Google” (y hacerlo rápido) – El Mostrador


Rashida Jones, la mujer que quiere acabar con el porno… tal y como lo conocemos – El Mostrador

“La tecnología ha hecho que el porno se vuelva mainstream, parte de la cultura popular”, apunta la actriz y productora.Un cambio que está propiciando que, por ejemplo, los niños accedan cada vez antes a este tipo de contenidos.

Fuente: Rashida Jones, la mujer que quiere acabar con el porno… tal y como lo conocemos – El Mostrador


“La palabra ‘pirata’ pareciera haberse convertido en una especie de fetiche” – El Mostrador

La reproducción y distribución ilegal de copias de obras protegidas por el derecho de autor generan -sólo en Chile- pérdidas superiores a los US$4 mil millones. Cómo frenar la circulación de material apócrifo y desincentivar el consumo de productos culturales falsos, es el desafío que se han impuesto la PDI y Editorial Santillana.

Fuente: “La palabra ‘pirata’ pareciera haberse convertido en una especie de fetiche” – El Mostrador


Lawsuit Seeks Transparency as Searches of Cellphones and Laptops Skyrocket at Borders

A number of recent cases in the media have revealed instances of U.S. citizens and others being compelled by CBP agents to unlock their devices for search. In some instances, people have claimed to have been physically coerced into complying, including one American citizen who said that CBP agents grabbed him by the neck in order to take his cellphone out of his possession.

Fuente: Lawsuit Seeks Transparency as Searches of Cellphones and Laptops Skyrocket at Borders


From sweaters to suits: the evolution of Silicon Valley CEO style | Fashion | The Guardian

Snapchat’s Evan Spiegel wore a sharp suit for his company’s IPO – a far cry from the relaxed look we’ve come to expect from tech entrepreneurs

Fuente: From sweaters to suits: the evolution of Silicon Valley CEO style | Fashion | The Guardian


Mark Zuckerberg says change the world, yet he sets the rules | Carole Cadwalladr | Opinion | The Guardian

one response to his letter is to think it’s inspiring, touching, even, that there’s a billionaire out there who wants to build an “infrastructure”, a word he uses 24 times, that “prevents harm, helps during crises and rebuilds afterwards”.But here’s another response: where does that power end? Who holds it to account? What are the limits on it? Because the answer is there are none. Facebook’s power and dominance, its knowledge of every aspect of its users’ intimate lives, its ability to manipulate their – our – world view, its limitless ability to generate cash, is already beyond the reach of any government.

Fuente: Mark Zuckerberg says change the world, yet he sets the rules | Carole Cadwalladr | Opinion | The Guardian


The Facebook manifesto: Mark Zuckerberg’s letter to the world looks a lot like politics | Technology | The Guardian

The social media tycoon’s 5,700-word post about the ‘global community’ stokes rumours that another billionaire businessman is planning to run for president

Fuente: The Facebook manifesto: Mark Zuckerberg’s letter to the world looks a lot like politics | Technology | The Guardian


Fact-checkers are weapons in the post-truth wars, but they’re not all on one side | Media | The Guardian

The practice of spreading facts to counter falsehoods has been hailed as way to counter ‘fake news’, but on the front line the picture is becoming confused

Fuente: Fact-checkers are weapons in the post-truth wars, but they’re not all on one side | Media | The Guardian


Secret Docs Reveal: President Trump Has Inherited an FBI With Vast Hidden Powers

For example, the bureau’s agents can decide that a campus organization is not “legitimate” and therefore not entitled to robust protections for free speech; dig for derogatory information on potential informants without any basis for believing they are implicated in unlawful activity; use a person’s immigration status to pressure them to collaborate and then help deport them when they are no longer useful; conduct invasive “assessments” without any reason for suspecting the targets of wrongdoing; demand that companies provide the bureau with personal data about their users in broadly worded national security letters without actual legal authority to do so; fan out across the internet along with a vast army of informants, infiltrating countless online chat rooms; peer through the walls of private homes; and more. The FBI offered various justifications of these tactics to our reporters. But the documents and our reporting on them ultimately reveal a bureaucracy in dire need of greater transparency and accountability.

Fuente: Secret Docs Reveal: President Trump Has Inherited an FBI With Vast Hidden Powers


Commander-In-Chief Donald Trump Will Have Terrifying Powers. Thanks, Obama.

He’ll control an unaccountable drone program, and the prison at Guantanamo Bay. His FBI, including a network of 15,000 paid informants, already has a record of spying on mosques and activists, and his NSA’s surveillance empire is ubiquitous and governed by arcane rules, most of which remain secret. He will inherit bombing campaigns in seven Muslim countries, the de facto ability to declare war unilaterally, and a massive nuclear arsenal — much of which is on hair-trigger alert.

Fuente: Commander-In-Chief Donald Trump Will Have Terrifying Powers. Thanks, Obama.


Privacy experts fear Donald Trump accessing global surveillance network | World news | The Guardian

Privacy activists, human rights campaigners and former US security officials have expressed fears over the prospect of Donald Trump gaining access to the vast global US and UK surveillance network.

Fuente: Privacy experts fear Donald Trump accessing global surveillance network | World news | The Guardian


Iceland election could propel radical Pirate party into power | World news | The Guardian

A party that favours direct democracy, complete government transparency, decriminalising drugs and offering asylum to Edward Snowden could form the next government in Iceland after the country goes to the polls on Saturday.

Fuente: Iceland election could propel radical Pirate party into power | World news | The Guardian


Facebook and Google: most powerful and secretive empires we’ve ever known | Technology | The Guardian

Google and Facebook have conveyed nearly all of us to this page, and just about every other idea or expression we’ll encounter today. Yet we don’t know how to talk about these companies, nor digest their sheer power.

Fuente: Facebook and Google: most powerful and secretive empires we’ve ever known | Technology | The Guardian


What does a feminist internet look like? | Chitra Nagarajan | Opinion | The Guardian

Feminist activists from around the world were in a conference room in Brazil, discussing what a feminist internet might look like. How did we get here?

Fuente: What does a feminist internet look like? | Chitra Nagarajan | Opinion | The Guardian


Silicon Valley was going to disrupt capitalism. Now it’s enhancing it | Opinion | The Guardian

The tech giants thought they would beat old businesses but the health and finance industries are using data troves to become more, not less, resilient

Fuente: Silicon Valley was going to disrupt capitalism. Now it’s enhancing it | Opinion | The Guardian


Google to be hit by new complaint from Brussels – FT.com

Margrethe Vestager, the EU’s competition commissioner, is planning to issue two separate “statements of objections” against the company for allegedly abusing its market power in online advertising and shopping, said people familiar with the case.

Fuente: Google to be hit by new complaint from Brussels – FT.com


Brexit Is Only the Latest Proof of the Insularity and Failure of Western Establishment Institutions

The decision by U.K. voters to leave the EU is such a glaring repudiation of the wisdom and relevance of elite political and media institutions that — for once — their failures have become a prominent part of the storyline.

Fuente: Brexit Is Only the Latest Proof of the Insularity and Failure of Western Establishment Institutions


Google: new concerns raised about political influence by senior ‘revolving door’ jobs | Technology | The Guardian

New concerns have been raised about the political influence of Google after research found at least 80 “revolving door” moves in the past decade – instances where the online giant took on government employees and European governments employed Google staff.

Fuente: Google: new concerns raised about political influence by senior ‘revolving door’ jobs | Technology | The Guardian


Live Q&A: What role can technology play in fighting corruption? | Global Development Professionals Network | The Guardian

Over 81,000 reports have been made to I Paid a Bribe, a special website for whistleblowers in India. Not in My Country guides students in Uganda and Kenya through the complaint process for reporting lecturers for corruption, and €5m of corruption involving Greek civil servants has been uncovered through the website EdosaFakelaki.

Fuente: Live Q&A: What role can technology play in fighting corruption? | Global Development Professionals Network | The Guardian


Cupertino’s mayor: Apple ‘abuses us’ by not paying taxes | Technology | The Guardian

The last time the mayor of Cupertino walked into Apple – the largest company in his small Californian town and, it so happens, the most valuable company in the world – he hoped to have a meeting to talk about traffic congestion.Barry Chang barely made it into the lobby when Apple’s security team surrounded and escorted him off the property.

Fuente: Cupertino’s mayor: Apple ‘abuses us’ by not paying taxes | Technology | The Guardian


Snowden insiste en defender la protección de la privacidad en la red – El Mostrador

“Si se dice que la privacidad me da igual porque no tengo nada que ocultar, entonces sería como decir que te da igual la libertad de expresión porque no tienes nada que decir”, explicó el ex analista de inteligencia estadounidense.

Fuente: Snowden insiste en defender la protección de la privacidad en la red – El Mostrador


Luz, cámara, Andrónico: La semana más mediática de Luksic – El Mostrador

El empresario preguntó a sus asesores y fue advertido de los riesgos que traería publicar un video de YouTube en el cual daba explicaciones: los memes y una visibilidad que nunca había tenido el representante de la fortuna más grande de Chile. Pero la decisión ya estaba tomada. incluida la que permitió a Yerko Puchento subirlo al columpio en su propio canal. “Lo que quise hacer fue algo nuevo, distinto y absolutamente abierto, para que todo el mundo tenga la posibilidad, corriendo el riesgo de ser atacado, mofado, todo lo que ustedes han visto. El tiempo dirá si fue una buena o mala decisión”, dijo Luksic.

Fuente: Luz, cámara, Andrónico: La semana más mediática de Luksic – El Mostrador


Facebook celebra “un gran arranque de año” en el que triplica sus beneficios – El Mostrador

Los datos publicados este miércoles revelan la creciente importancia de la publicidad para dispositivos móviles, que representa ya el 82 % del total, frente al 73 % del mismo periodo del año anterior. Los resultados llegan después de que Apple anunciase ayer la primera caída de sus beneficios trimestrales en 13 años y de que Twitter y Google diesen a conocer números que no lograron satisfacer las expectativas de Wall Street.

Fuente: Facebook celebra “un gran arranque de año” en el que triplica sus beneficios – El Mostrador


Las filtraciones a través de la historia: desde Esparta hasta los Panamá Papers – El Mostrador

Edward Snowden y Julian Assange no son universalmente populares, pero incluso sus críticos más severos no han insinuado que sus acciones provocaran una revuelta militar o causado que políticos sean transportados desde su cámara de debates para ser estrangulados por la multitud.

Fuente: Las filtraciones a través de la historia: desde Esparta hasta los Panamá Papers – El Mostrador


The Panama Papers: public interest disclosure v the right to private legal advice | David Allen Green

There have been two main responses to the leak of the Panama Papers.The first has been a great shrug of indifference: so what? The rich and powerful do things that only the rich and powerful can do. The second is a warm, indeed enthusiastic, welcome to this dramatic exercise in transparency: we can now see how the rich and powerful do the things that only the rich and powerful can do. The political consequences of the leak, for example in Iceland and the UK, indicate that the transparency in turn is leading to greater accountability.Are these the only valid responses? Is there any issue here about privacy and the right to confidential legal advice? Or are such concerns mere fusspottery and point-missing?

Fuente: The Panama Papers: public interest disclosure v the right to private legal advice | David Allen Green


¿Vuelve el secreto de sumario a Chile? – Derechos Digitales

La agenda corta antidelincuencia en tramitación incorpora una norma que permitirá ampliar el secreto de las investigaciones judiciales, sancionando a cualquiera que lo viole con la privación de libertad hasta por 540 días. Nuevamente nos encontramos frente a una norma inserta en un proyecto que ignora la evolución e impacto propios del periodismo de investigación que actualmente tiene lugar en la red.

Fuente: ¿Vuelve el secreto de sumario a Chile? – Derechos Digitales


Fronda y censura: la mordaza de la Transición – El Mostrador

La Fronda pretende encerrar el debate en los marcos legales, arrinconar al SII y deslegitimar a la Fiscalía, todo eso para escapar de lo que parece una tormenta perfecta. La norma que se propone no pretende, solamente, reducir el espacio de acción de la prensa, sino también pretende privar a la opinión pública de información fundamental para decidir por quién votar y por quién no votar. Esto explica por qué la Fronda se siente tan amenazada por la nueva lógica de los medios digitales y las redes: ya no puede controlar los contenidos, ya no puede censurar en las cortes. La Fronda busca protegerse de forma impúdica, aterrada ante la disolución del principio de autoridad que había guiado la transición.

Fuente: Fronda y censura: la mordaza de la Transición – El Mostrador


Panamá Papers: las formas en las que los ricos y poderosos esconden riquezas y evaden impuestos – El Mostrador

Millones de documentos filtrados de la compañía panameña Mossack Fonseca muestran cómo la firma ayudó a clientes a lavar esconcer dinero y evadir impuestos.

Fuente: Panamá Papers: las formas en las que los ricos y poderosos esconden riquezas y evaden impuestos – El Mostrador


Fundación Karisma | Misoginia en internet: bombardeo a campo abierto contra las periodistas

No cabe duda que internet ha potenciado la libertad de expresión. Tampoco es equivocado señalar que las mismas dinámicas que emergen también están excluyendo e impidiendo el ejercicio de este derecho. Y hay quienes lo sufren más que otras personas, por ejemplo, mujeres, personas de la comunidad LGTTTBI o minorías étnicas. ¿No les llama la atención que sean los mismos grupos de persona que sufren continuamente discriminación y violencia? Pues sí, internet no es muy diferente del mundo analógico ni es la pana

Fuente: Fundación Karisma | Misoginia en internet: bombardeo a campo abierto contra las periodistas


Google's Jigsaw project has new ideas, but an old imperial mindset | Global | The Guardian

Human development is too important, too complex, and too culturally diverse to be left to profit-driven companies acting in their own interests

Fuente: Google’s Jigsaw project has new ideas, but an old imperial mindset | Global | The Guardian


Spread of internet has not conquered 'digital divide' between rich and poor – report | Technology | The Guardian

Study by World Bank praises potential of technology to transform lives, but warns of risk of creating a ‘new underclass’ of the disconnected

Fuente: Spread of internet has not conquered ‘digital divide’ between rich and poor – report | Technology | The Guardian


The political storm over the Googleplex – FT.com

The political storm over the Googleplex – FT.com.

High quality global journalism requires investment. Please share this article with others using the link below, do not cut & paste the article. See our Ts&Cs and Copyright Policy for more detail. Email ftsales.support@ft.com to buy additional rights. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/b2eeb470-ecca-11e4-b82f-00144feab7de.html#ixzz3YenN6es5

Concern about government snooping is mixed with anxiety about commercial use of data
Ingram Pinn illustration©Ingram Pinn

Google regularly tops the list of companies that students want to work for and, visiting its Silicon Valley campus last week, I could see why. The skies were blue, the temperature was perfect. A group of employees was playing volleyball, while out in the car-park somebody was demonstrating a prototype of a self-driving Google car.

Amid all the fun, Google has emerged as one of the five largest companies in the world, measured by market capitalisation. The largest, Apple, is about 20 minutes drive down the road. Facebook, another giant, is in a nearby suburb.

Yet the Silicon Valley idyll is increasingly being disturbed by political storms blowing in from foreign lands. The world’s students may aspire to work for Google. But the world’s politicians seem to want to bring the company to heel.

This month saw the announcement that the European Commission in Brussels is charging Google with violations of competition law. Potentially, the charges threaten the company with a choice between massive fines or costly modifications to its business model.

Europe is not the only source of trouble. Most western multinationals see the Chinese market as crucial to their futures. But Google, along with Facebook and Twitter, is effectively shut out by the country’s “Great Firewall” that blocks internet access.

Meanwhile, Silicon Valley’s close relations with the Obama administration have got a lot tenser since Edward Snowden’s revelations about the extent of US government snooping on the internet.

The Snowden affair seems to have galvanised those who believe there is something sinister about the power of Silicon Valley. French critics came up with the acronym, “Gafa” (Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon), to encapsulate America’s evil internet empire. As the acronym suggests, it is often Google that is placed first in the firing line. Company executives were aghast when the British government decided to crack down on alleged tax avoidance by multinationals and the new measures were dubbed the “Google tax”.

One theory is that Google has attracted particular attention simply because it is the most ubiquitous name in Silicon Valley. (Not everybody can afford an iPhone, but Google is free to anyone with internet access). Another argument is that the breadth of Google’s activities means it is upsetting incumbents all over the world — whether it is newspapers angered by Google News; media companies threatened by YouTube (owned by Google); publishers that hate Google books; or car manufacturers who see driverless cars on the roads and worry that even their industry is vulnerable to the Valley.

Some European politicians have been explicit in their concerns that the success of the US internet giants poses a direct threat to Europe. Sigmar Gabriel, Germany’s vice-chancellor, worried aloud last year that “this (digital) infrastructure will be controlled by a handful of American internet concerns, which could dominate the economic life of the 21st century.”

One of the most vociferous corporate critics of Google is the Axel Springer publishing group in Germany, a powerful voice in Berlin and Brussels, and which provided crucial support for the election of Jean-Claude Juncker as the head of the European Commission.

President Obama seemed to buy the idea that US internet companies are the victims of European protectionism, when he argued recently that — “We (America) have owned the internet. Our companies have created it, expanded it, perfected it, in ways they can’t compete.” What Mr Obama did not add is that the US government itself has done much to damage Silicon Valley. The Snowden affair has firmly established the idea that any internet search, email or post is open to surveillance, either by the government or by the likes of Google and Facebook.

Google and other internet giants vehemently deny that they ever gave governments the keys to a secret back door into their data. Indeed, they complain that they were themselves the
victims of snooping. In an effort to regain consumer trust, the Silicon Valley firms are emphasising their new encryption technologies and privacy safeguards. But the damage is done. Concern about government snooping has become intertwined with anxiety about the commercial use of data by firms such as Google. That, in turn, has fed the appetite for the regulation of the internet.

 


Google’s dominance faces a challenge at last. Shame it’s too late | Comment is free | The Guardian

Google’s dominance faces a challenge at last. Shame it’s too late | Comment is free | The Guardian.

Denmarks Economy Minister Margrethe Vest Taking on the search giant: EC competition commissioner Margrethe Vestager. Photograph: Keld Navntoft/AFP/Getty Images

So the European commission has finally decided that Google may have a case to answer in relation to claims that it has been abusing its monopoly position in search. On Thursday, Margrethe Vestager, the competition commissioner, announced that the preliminary findings of the commission’s investigation supported the claim that Google “systematically” gave prominence to its own ads, which amounted to an abuse of its dominant position in search. “I’m concerned,” she said, “that Google has artificially boosted its presence in the comparison shopping market with the result that consumers may not necessarily see what’s most relevant for them or that competitors may not get the commercial opportunity that their innovative services deserve.” Google, which, needless to say, disputes these claims, now has 10 weeks in which to respond.

To those of us who follow these things, the most interesting thing about Thursday’s announcement is the way it highlights the radical differences that are emerging between European and American attitudes to internet giants. The Wall Street Journal recently revealed that the US Federal Trade Commission had investigated similar claims about Google’s abuse of monopoly power in 2012 and that some of the agency’s staff had recommended charging the company with violating antitrust (unfair competition) laws. But in the end, the FTC backed off.

Now it turns out that its staff had been in regular communication with the European commission’s investigators in Brussels, which means that the Europeans knew what the Americans knew about Google’s activities. But the commission has acted, whereas the FTC did not. Why?

Leaving aside conspiracist explanations (eg that the American authorities don’t wish to enfeeble US companies that will ensure continued US economic hegemony in the digital era), the difference may be a reflection of the way in which antitrust law has been gradually infected by neoliberal ideology. Once upon a time, it was taken for granted that industrial monopolies were, by their very nature, intolerable for the simple reason that, as Lord Acton famously observed, power tends to corrupt and absolute power corrupts absolutely.

But then a radically different idea was injected into the legislative bloodstream by Robert Bork, a distinguished American lawyer, in his 1978 book, The Antitrust Paradox. One implication of Bork’s argument was that overwhelming market dominance was not necessarily a bad thing. Monopoly could be a reflection of a firm’s superior efficiency: we should expect truly exceptional firms to attract the majority of the customers, and so overzealous antitrust prosecutions could effectively punish excellence and thus disadvantage, rather than protect, consumers.


Google 'illegally took content from Amazon, Yelp, TripAdvisor,' report finds | Technology | The Guardian

Google ‘illegally took content from Amazon, Yelp, TripAdvisor,’ report finds | Technology | The Guardian.

 Google has been a leading silicon valley supporter of the Obama administration. Photograph: Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP
Google sign at the company's headquarters in Mountain View, California

Google manipulated its search results to promote its own services over those of rival websites in ways that led to “real harm to consumers”, a previously unpublished report by American regulators has concluded.

The revelations were seized on by those calling for Brussels to challenge Google’s monopoly over search in Europe, and have sparked new claims that the search giant’s financing of Barack Obama’s re-election campaign swayed US regulators.

America’s Federal Trade Commission (FTC) voted unanimously to end its investigation into Google in early 2013 after extracting concessions from the silicon valley company.

But documents accidentally handed to the Wall Street Journal show the FTC’s own investigators claim Google’s “conduct has resulted – and will result – in real harm to consumers and to innovation in the online search and advertising markets”.

The findings, contained in a report produced in 2012 by FTC staff to advise commissioners before their final decision on the case, claim Google also caused “harm to many vertical competitors”.


Wired women: the $3tn women powering China's tech boom | Technology | The Guardian

Wired women: the $3tn women powering China’s tech boom | Technology | The Guardian.

China’s 115 million upper middle class women are driving ecommerce and social media in China, outspending their US equivalents by double on the biggest shopping days of the year

Wealthy Chinese women are using WeCat for socialising, paying can fares and finding work
Wealthy Chinese women are using WeCat for socialising, paying can fares and finding work Photograph: ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images

“Women hold up half the sky,” Chairman Mao once said. In the Chinese digital economy the same is true, with a newly empowered middle class of wealthy, well educated women who live and breathe social media and online shopping, spending $3tn annually in China alone.

The average Chinese ‘wired woman’, according to research presented by Evelina Lye, SapientNitro’s head of marketing for Asia Pacific told SXSW on Sunday, typically own as many as five devices each. This group of around 115 million women are aged 25-35, half if them are mothers, 75% are college graduates and 87% are in employment.

The Chinese tech ecosystem looks very different to the rest of the world, with a domestic market that has become very powerful in the past three years; WeChat is ubiquitous, used for everything from taxi cab fares to messaging friends, but for every household name in western technology there are ten viable Chinese services.


Lo que pasa en Twitter se queda (casi siempre) en Twitter | Verne EL PAÍS

Lo que pasa en Twitter se queda (casi siempre) en Twitter | Verne EL PAÍS.

La bolsa de Nueva York, el día en el que Twitter comenzó a cotizarLa bolsa de Nueva York, el día en el que Twitter comenzó a cotizar.

Twitter me gusta. No lo voy a negar. Y no estoy solo: esta red social cuenta con 288 millones de usuarios que se conectan al menos una vez al mes y que escriben 500 millones de tuits cada día, según datos facilitados por la empresa. Esos tuits pueden ayudarte a pasar el rato o proponerte artículos que no sospechabas ni que existían. También, por qué no, en Twitter puedes conocer a gente maja e incluso encontrar trabajo.

Pero todo esto no quita que Twitter esté sobrevalorado. Le prestamos más atención a esta red de la que realmente se merece. Es una red muy usada, sin duda, pero también tiene sus propios códigos y un entorno cerrado. Es decir, lo que pasa en Twitter se queda en Twitter.

Entonces, ¿por qué parece lo contrario?

Los titulares que hacen referencia a cómo “arden las redes sociales”, suelen centrarse en Twitter. Alguno puede creer que los medios tratan lo que ocurre en la red buscando el clic fácil, incluso el retuit. No es así. Varía mucho del medio (y de la noticia), pero Twitter suele traer menos de un 10% del tráfico que procede de las redes sociales. La mayor parte, hasta el 90%, viene de Facebook, que tiene 890 millones de usuarios cada día. Incluso a pesar de que Twitter está lleno de periodistas que se retuitean los unos a los otros.

Simplemente ocurre que Twitter es muy cómodo para los medios (sí, Verne incluido), ya que los usuarios comentan muy a menudo contenidos ligados a la actualidad, por lo que son un termómetro rápido para saber qué está ocurriendo.

Hay más. Como escribe Eugeni Morozov en To Save Everything, Click Here, no es de extrañar que muchas campañas promocionales aspiren a ser el centro de conversación en esta red: “Una vez la historia consigue este estatus tan deseado, atrae aún más atención, llegando a conversaciones que van más allá de Twitter. En este sentido, Twitter también es una máquina, no una cámara; no se limita a reflejar realidades: las crea de forma activa”.

Sería más difícil recurrir a Facebook para intentar ver qué se está comentando sobre un tema. La mayoría de los perfiles Facebook son privados y sus actualizaciones no suelen ser comentarios a la actualidad, sino más bien contenido personal. .

Instagram también tiene más peso que Twitter. Desde diciembre, también cuenta con más usuarios: 300 millones al mes. Pero claro, los contenidos de esta red no están tan marcados por la actualidad como ocurre en el caso de Twitter y aunque se usen hashtags, resulta más difícil buscar fotos sobre un tema que tuits.


A digital public space is Britain’s missing national institution | Technology | The Guardian

A digital public space is Britain’s missing national institution | Technology | The Guardian.

David BowieA costume from a David Bowie exhibition at the Victoria and Albert museum in central London. The V&A is under-represented in the digital world. Photograph: Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images

A cynic might say that we have the internet we deserve. We were promised a democratic platform for change, for equality, for collaboration, yet are faced with a reality of weary cynicism, as author Charles Leadbeater wrote last summer, and an assumption that we cannot trust any organisation with our personal data.

We were told of flourishing startups and opportunities for all, yet the internet has amplified global inequalities, says Andrew Keen, a writer on the internet revolution, using the parlance of openness and opportunity to create an industry of disproportionately wealthy entrepreneurs.

And as the meaningful engagement of governments in the lives of citizens diminishes, we stare into a dystopian future described by Evgeny Morozov: Silicon Valley is heading towards a “digital socialism”, where benevolent corporations provide all the health, education, travel and housing employees could ever desire, negating the need for state provision. Ice that cake with the unpalatable truth about the reach of our government’s surveillance services and we might think our internet is already beyond help.

Commercial interests have shaped the internet, and have created such powerful organisations that governments now struggle to keep up – out-funded, out-lobbied and outwitted. Rather than reflecting the real world, the internet absorbs and amplifies it, re-presenting a version of our lives, our work and our culture, from the gross disproportion of privilege and access afforded to those even able to access the internet to the misogyny that cripples meaningful debate. Even acknowledging its infancy, the internet does not represent a version of ourselves of which we can be proud. From privacy and surveillance to our collective cultural record, where is the internet we are truly capable of? Quietly, excitedly, and in a modestly British way, there is an alternative emerging. Rather than the internet as shopping mall – defined and dominated by commercial interests – how could we build the public park of the internet?


Las tecnológicas toman el mando | Economía | EL PAÍS

Las tecnológicas toman el mando | Economía | EL PAÍS.


El sector domina la clasificación de las 50 firmas con mayor valor en Bolsa con Apple distanciándose como líder absoluto

Sede de Apple en Cupertino (California). / EFE

Han pasado casi 15 años desde el estallido de la burbuja tecnológica que llevó al índice bursátil Nasdaq a superar los 5.000 puntos. En el arranque de 2015, las empresas tecnológicas vuelven a tomar el mando. El Nasdaq tiene a tiro sus máximos históricos y la nueva economía es el sector más representado entre las 50 compañías con mayor capitalización bursátil al cierre de 2014. La lista está encabezada por tercer año consecutivo por Apple, pero esta vez tiene a su lado a otras 13 firmas tecnológicas y tres de telecomunicaciones. La tecnología vence a las finanzas y a la energía en el Olimpo empresarial.

El Zeus indiscutible de ese Olimpo es Apple. La firma fundada por Steve Jobs ni siquiera aparecía a finales de 2008 entre las 50 empresas con mayor valor en Bolsa. Con los éxitos del iPod, el iPhone y el iPad se ha instalado en lo más alto y se destaca de sus perseguidores. Por primera vez, la distancia entre la primera y la segunda empresa con mayor en Bolsa a cierre de un ejercicio es de más de 200.000 millones de euros. Dirigida por Tim Cook, el lanzamiento del iPhone 6 ha catapultado a Apple en Bolsa. En 2014, el valor de la empresa aumentó en 168.000 millones de euros, más de lo que vale Samsung.

Microsoft, muy fuerte en 2014, y Google escoltan a Apple en el podio tecnológico. La gran irrupción del año fue, sin embargo, Alibaba. La empresa china de comercio electrónico, Internet y medios de pago digitales se estrenó en Bolsa en septiembre del año pasado y ya es la 13ª compañía cotizada con mayor capitalización. Facebook, que entró en la lista en 2013 por primera vez escala 24 posiciones y ya es la vigésima de la clasificación.

Otras ocho compañías tecnológicas se sitúan entre las 50 más valiosas. Con ello, el sector adelanta al financiero por número de representantes. ¿Una nueva burbuja? Los analistas marcan diferencias muy notables entre lo que ocurrió a finales de los noventa del pasado siglo con lo que está sucediendo ahora en los mercados. Las grandes compañías tecnológicas cotizadas, como Apple, Microsoft, Google, Facebook, Oracle, IBM, Intel, Alibaba o Samsung tienen sólidos ingresos y beneficios. Es cierto que puede haber excesos de valoración en algunas empresas menos consolidadas, como Uber o SnapChat, pero no afectan al núcleo de las grandes empresas cotizadas del sector.


Apple gana el juicio por monopolio en la reproducción de música en el iPod | Tecnología | EL PAÍS

Apple gana el juicio por monopolio en la reproducción de música en el iPod | Tecnología | EL PAÍS.


Steve Jobs durante la presentación de iTunes en Japón en 2005. / SHIZUO KAMBAYASHI (AP)

Enviar a LinkedIn5
Enviar a TuentiEnviar a Eskup

EnviarImprimirGuardar

Un jurado de Oakland (California) falló este martes a favor de la empresa tecnológica Apple en el juicio que se libraba en su contra por presunta violación de las leyes antimonopolio al impedir reproducir en los viejosiPod música procedente de plataformas que no fueran iTunes, su propia tienda de contenidos multimedia. La demanda colectiva de una coalición de consumidores le reclamaba 350 millones de dólares. Durante el juicio, los abogados de los demandantes no dudaron en recurrir a correos enviados por el fallecido Steve Jobs, entonces en uno de los momentos más dulces de su vida, mostrando su reacción ante la posible competencia.


What Bad, Shameful, Dirty Behavior is U.S. Judge Richard Posner Hiding? Demand to Know. – The Intercept

What Bad, Shameful, Dirty Behavior is U.S. Judge Richard Posner Hiding? Demand to Know. – The Intercept.Featured photo - What Bad, Shameful, Dirty Behavior is U.S. Judge Richard Posner Hiding? Demand to Know.

 


(updated below)

Richard Posner has been a federal appellate judge for 34 years, having been nominated by President Reagan in 1981. At a conference last week in Washington, Posner said the NSA should have the unlimited ability to collect whatever communications and other information it wants: “If the NSA wants to vacuum all the trillions of bits of information that are crawling through the electronic worldwide networks, I think that’s fine.” The NSA should have “carte blanche” to collect what it wants because “privacy interests should really have very little weight when you’re talking about national security.”

His rationale? “I think privacy is actually overvalued,” the distinguished jurist pronounced. Privacy, he explained, is something people crave in order to prevent others from learning about the shameful and filthy things they do:

Much of what passes for the name of privacy is really just trying to conceal the disreputable parts of your conduct. Privacy is mainly about trying to improve your social and business opportunities by concealing the sorts of bad activities that would cause other people not to want to deal with you. 

Unlike you and your need to hide your bad and dirty acts, Judge Posner has no need for privacy – or so he claims: “If someone drained my cell phone, they would find a picture of my cat, some phone numbers, some email addresses, some email text,” he said. “What’s the big deal?” He added: “Other people must have really exciting stuff. Do they narrate their adulteries, or something like that?”

I would like to propose a campaign inspired by Judge Posner’s claims (just by the way, one of his duties as a federal judge is to uphold the Fourth Amendment). In doing so, I’ll make the following observations:


Gates, Kutcher y Branson, unidos para cambiar el mundo | Tecnología | EL PAÍS

Gates, Kutcher y Branson, unidos para cambiar el mundo | Tecnología | EL PAÍS.

La plataforma de ciberactivismo Change.org recibe financiación por 25 millones de dólares

Oficinas de change.org en San Francisco. / ROSA J.C.

En un año han pasado de 35 millones de usuarios registrados a más de 80 en 196 países. El nivel de peticiones que consiguen su finalidad ya alcanza una hora diaria. Change.org considera que este ha sido su mejor aval para conseguir una ronda de financiación de 25 millones de dólares (unos 20 millones de euros). No es una cifra tan abultada como las que suelen airean Uber o las start-ups de moda, pero la plataforma de ciberactivismo sí puede presumir de famosos e históricos del mundo de la tecnología entre los que brindan apoyo económico.

Pocas empresas pueden presumir de contar entre sus inversores a los fundadores de LinkedIn, Twitter, Yahoo!, Microsoft, Virgin y el Huffington Post, pero sí es el caso de Change.org. En la última ronda de financiación de la plataforma han entrado Reid Hoffman, Evan Williams, Jerry Yang, Bill Gates, Bill Gates y Arianna Huffington. Ashton Kutcher, al que no le parecía tan mala idea que Uber planease espiar a periodistas, también está entre los que han aportado fondos. Más allá del mundo tecnológico, el financiero también ha mostrado su apoyo. Destacan nombres como el de Nicolas Berggruen o Joe Lonsdale del fondo Palantir, así como Sam Altman, presidente de la incubadora de start-ups de moda en Silicon Valley, Y Combinator.

Jennifer Dulski, presidenta del servicio, considera que este apoyo obedece al impacto que provocan en el mundo real: “No queremos un grupo de inversores capitalistas, sino personas relevantes que apoyan nuestra visión y nos ayudan con su experiencia”. Sin embargo, no son una ONG, tampoco una empresa sin ánimo de lucro. “Nos enmarcamos dentro de lo que se denomina ‘el bien social’. Somos una empresa que busca hacer el bien, hacer negocios con un fondo ético. El dinero que ganamos revierte en la plataforma. Nuestra intención es ser un ejemplo y que otras personas que quieran empezar un negocio vean que se puede conseguir inversión y hacer el bien. Ojalá sigan esta senda los emprendedores del mañana”, se ilusiona.


Entrevista a Julian Assange, fundador de Wikileaks: “Google nos espía e informa al Gobierno de Estados Unidos”

Entrevista a Julian Assange, fundador de Wikileaks: “Google nos espía e informa al Gobierno de Estados Unidos”.

Escrito por Ignacio Ramonet / Le Monde Diplomatique
Lunes, 01 de Diciembre de 2014 11:59

Desde hace treinta meses, Julian Assange, paladín de la lucha por una información libre, vive en Londres, refugiado en las oficinas de la Embajada de Ecuador. Este país latinoamericano tuvo el coraje de brindarle asilo diplomático cuando el fundador de WikiLeaks se hallaba perseguido y acosado por el Gobierno de Estados Unidos y varios de sus aliados (el Reino Unido, Suecia). El único crimen de Julian Assange es haber dicho la verdad y haber difundido, vía WikiLeaks, entre otras revelaciones, las siniestras realidades ocultas de las guerras de Irak y de Afganistán, y los tejemanejes e intrigas de la diplomacia estadounidense.

Como Edward Snowden, Chelsea Manning y Glenn Greenwald, Julian Assange forma parte de un nuevo grupo de disidentes que, por descubrir la verdad, son ahora rastreados, perseguidos y hostigados no por regímenes autoritarios sino por Estados que pretenden ser “democracias ejemplares”…

En su nuevo libro, Cuando Google encontró a WikiLeaks (Clave Intelectual, Madrid, 2014), cuya versión en español está en librerías desde el 1 de diciembre, Julian Assange va más lejos en sus revelaciones, estupendamente documentadas, como siempre. Todo parte de una larga conversación que Assange sostuvo, en junio de 2011, con Eric Schmidt, presidente ejecutivo de Google. Este vino a entrevistar al creador de WikiLeaks para un ensayo que estaba preparando sobre el futuro de la era digital. Cuando se publicó el libro, titulado The New Digital Era (2013), Assange constató que sus declaraciones habían sido tergiversadas y que las tesis defendidas por Schmidt eran considerablemente delirantes y megalomaníacas. El nuevo libro del fundador de WikiLeaks es su respuesta a esas elucubraciones del presidente de Google. Entre muchas otras cosas, Assange revela cómo Google –y Facebook, y Amazon, etc.– nos espía y nos vigila; y cómo transmite esa información a las agencias de inteligencia de Estados Unidos. Y cómo la empresa líder en tecnologías digitales tiene una estrecha relación, casi estructural, con el Departamento de Estado. Afirma también Assange, que hoy, las grandes empresas de la galaxia digital nos vigilan y nos controlan más que los propios Estados.

Cuando Google encontró a WikiLeaks es una obra inteligente, estimulante y necesaria. Una fiesta para el espíritu. Nos abre los ojos sobre nuestras propias prácticas de comunicación cotidianas cuando usamos un smartphone, una tablet, un ordenador o cuando navegamos simplemente por Internet con la candidez de quien se cree más libre que nunca. ¡Ojo! Nos explica Assange, como Pulgarcito, vas sembrando rastros de ti mismo y de tu vida privada que algunas empresas, como Google, recogen con sumo cuidado y archivan secretamente. Un día, las utilizarán contra ti…

Para conversar de todo esto y de algunas cosas más, nos encontramos con un Julian Assange entusiasta y fatigado, en Londres, el pasado 24 de octubre, en una pequeña sala acogedora de la Embajada de Ecuador. Llega sonriente y pálido, con una barba rubia de varios días, con su cabeza de ángel prerrafaelista, cabellos largos, rasgos finos, ojos claros… Es alto y delgado. Habla con voz muy baja y lenta. Lo que dice es profundo y pensado, le sale de muy adentro. Tiene un algo de gurú… Habíamos previsto charlar no más de media hora, para no cansarlo, pero con el paso del tiempo la conversación se fue poniendo interesante. Y finalmente hablamos más de dos horas y media…