Caso coimas Latam golpea a Piñera y su nombre es asociado a “corrupción” en universo digital – El Mostrador

resalta el informe de la Universidad Central: “Interbarómetro” del mes de septiembre, que se dedica a medir los flujos de información e interacciones en la red, con el fin de “dar respuesta al desafío de comprender el creciente desplazamiento de la política hacia el territorio digital”.

Fuente: Caso coimas Latam golpea a Piñera y su nombre es asociado a “corrupción” en universo digital – El Mostrador


Piñera es el presidenciable con más exposición en la prensa según investigación Usach

Se trata de un proyecto realizado en conjunto por el Centro de Investigación, Sociedad, Economía y Cultura (Cisec) de la Facultad de Administración y Economía (FAE) de la Universidad de Santiago (Usach) y del Centro de Innovación en Tecnologías de la Información para Aplicaciones Sociales (Citiaps) de la misma casa de estudios.

Fuente: Piñera es el presidenciable con más exposición en la prensa según investigación Usach


A Conversation on Privacy With Edward Snowden, Noam Chomsky, and Glenn Greenwald

NSA WHISTLEBLOWER Edward Snowden joined MIT professor Noam Chomsky and The Intercept’s Glenn Greenwald on Friday for a discussion on privacy rights hosted by the University of Arizona College of Social and Behavioral Sciences. The panel was moderated by Nuala O’Connor, the president of the Center for Democracy and Technology.

Fuente: A Conversation on Privacy With Edward Snowden, Noam Chomsky, and Glenn Greenwald


One big problem with open access and why the best way to fix it isn't going to work – Curt Rice

One big problem with open access and why the best way to fix it isn’t going to work – Curt Rice.

There’s a conflict, a tension, an inherent contradiction in the open access movement, and while it could be resolved, that seems increasingly unlikely.

The inconsistency goes like this: the shift to open access publishing started idealistically, with enthusiasm and pressure from the grassroots. The business model for disseminating scientific results would be changed. Instead of putting research into journals that were expensive and exclusive, we would make articles available for free. No charge at all. Ready to be downloaded by anyone with an internet connection.

Shaking in their boots

We developed more and more arguments for open access — not just solidarity with colleagues in poorer countries, but also the (im)morality of paying first for research to be done (through salaries) and then for the articles to be reviewed and edited (through volunteer work for journals) and then paying once again to be able to read them (through subscriptions). Add to this the monopolistic price gouging of the biggest publishers, whose profit rates exceed those of oil companies, and change seemed inevitable.

Wall Street analysts say open access has failed, but their analysis might help us succeed. If we dare.

Some of these arguments worked. Gradually, research councils pulled themselves over the gunwales and got onboard. Governments articulated policies. Universities gave their researchers a nudge.

The publishers started to shake in their boots. They really did. They got worried.

But then they got over it.

And this is where the other side of the inconsistency comes into play. The tension in the movement is that its idealistic and anarchistic origins are in conflict with what is needed for success, namely a clear message articulated by visible and visionary leadership.