The U.S. Has Ramped Up Airstrikes Against ISIS in Raqqa, and Syrian Civilians Are Paying the Price

Thanks to camera phones and social media, the deadly consequences of U.S. military operations are indeed being recorded, shared, and watched around the world on an unprecedented scale. But while civilian deaths are regularly reported in local media outlets in the Middle East, they are seldom reported in detail by international media.

Fuente: The U.S. Has Ramped Up Airstrikes Against ISIS in Raqqa, and Syrian Civilians Are Paying the Price


Chelsea Manning released from military prison | US news | The Guardian

Chelsea Manning, the army private who released a vast trove of US state secrets and was punished by the US military for months in penal conditions denounced by the UN as torture, has been released from a military prison in Kansas after serving seven years of a 35-year sentence.

Fuente: Chelsea Manning released from military prison | US news | The Guardian


Campaign group to challenge UK over surrender of passwords at border control | Politics | The Guardian

The move comes after its international director, Muhammad Rabbani, a UK citizen, was arrested at Heathrow airport in November for refusing to hand over passwords. Rabbani, 35, has been detained at least 20 times over the past decade when entering the UK, under schedule 7 of terrorism legislation that provides broad search powers, but this was the first time he had been arrested.

Fuente: Campaign group to challenge UK over surrender of passwords at border control | Politics | The Guardian


Teenage hackers motivated by morality not money, study finds | Technology | The Guardian

Young people attack computer networks to impress friends and challenge political system, crime research shows

Fuente: Teenage hackers motivated by morality not money, study finds | Technology | The Guardian


Prominent Human Rights Activists in Egypt Targeted by Sophisticated Hacking Attacks

The campaign, which the reports call Nile Phish, coincides with an unprecedented crackdown on civil society in Egypt over the past few years, with non-governmental organizations and their staff being subjected to interrogations, arrests, travel bans, asset freezes, forced closures and a long-running trial over accusations of receiving foreign funding to destabilize the country.

Fuente: Prominent Human Rights Activists in Egypt Targeted by Sophisticated Hacking Attacks


Edward Snowden backers beam calls for pardon on Washington news museum | US news | The Guardian

Now the most audacious display of support for Snowden is under way. Messages calling for his pardon are being beamed on to the outside wall of the Newseum, the Washington institution devoted to freedom of speech and the press that stands less than two miles from the White House.

Fuente: Edward Snowden backers beam calls for pardon on Washington news museum | US news | The Guardian


California single mother faces jail time for selling homemade food on Facebook | US news | The Guardian

The Facebook group, which she doesn’t use any more, was designed to build community, Ruelas added.“It helped a lot of people in a lot of ways. The purpose wasn’t to get rich.”

Fuente: California single mother faces jail time for selling homemade food on Facebook | US news | The Guardian


Open Data Projects Are Fueling the Fight Against Police Misconduct

situation is beginning to change — as a growing number of police accountability groups are starting to bypass the departments by aggregating and distributing misconduct history databases on their own.

Fuente: Open Data Projects Are Fueling the Fight Against Police Misconduct


Las detenciones irregulares en São Paulo que empezaron con un militar infiltrado en Tinder | Internacional | EL PAÍS

EL PAÍS reconstruye la detención de 21 personas antes de una marcha contra el presidente Temer el pasado día 4Los manifestantes sospechan que un militar se infiltró en varias redes sociales, entre ellos una de ligue, para identificarlos

Fuente: Las detenciones irregulares en São Paulo que empezaron con un militar infiltrado en Tinder | Internacional | EL PAÍS


New Film Tells the Story of Edward Snowden; Here Are the Surveillance Programs He Helped Expose

Oliver Stone’s latest film, “Snowden,” bills itself as a dramatized version of the life of Edward Snowden, the NSA whistleblower who revealed the global extent of U.S. surveillance capabilities.

Fuente: New Film Tells the Story of Edward Snowden; Here Are the Surveillance Programs He Helped Expose


‘Edward Snowden did this country a great service. Let him come home’ | US news | The Guardian

Bernie Sanders, Daniel Ellsberg, former members of the NSA and more weigh in on whether Obama should grant clemency to the divisive whistleblower

Fuente: ‘Edward Snowden did this country a great service. Let him come home’ | US news | The Guardian


Edward Snowden makes ‘moral’ case for presidential pardon | US news | The Guardian

Edward Snowden has set out the case for Barack Obama granting him a pardon before the US president leaves office in January, arguing that the disclosure of the scale of surveillance by US and British intelligence agencies was not only morally right but had left citizens better off.

Fuente: Edward Snowden makes ‘moral’ case for presidential pardon | US news | The Guardian


What does a feminist internet look like? | Chitra Nagarajan | Opinion | The Guardian

Feminist activists from around the world were in a conference room in Brazil, discussing what a feminist internet might look like. How did we get here?

Fuente: What does a feminist internet look like? | Chitra Nagarajan | Opinion | The Guardian


German proposals could see refugees’ phones searched by police | World news | The Guardian

Checking smartphones of those without passports among measures announced by the interior minister, Thomas de Maizière

Fuente: German proposals could see refugees’ phones searched by police | World news | The Guardian


Chelsea Manning: ‘It is terrifying to face the government alone’ | US news | The Guardian

In an interview with Amnesty International, made exclusive to the Guardian ahead of its publication in the new book Here I Stand, Chelsea Manning describes her feelings of isolation while in the hands of the most powerful government in the world.

Fuente: Chelsea Manning: ‘It is terrifying to face the government alone’ | US news | The Guardian


Israel Targeting Palestinian Protesters on Facebook

Facebook represents a new battleground in the long-running Israel-Palestinian conflict. Israeli officials blame social media for inciting violence, and arrests of Palestinians for Facebook posts have dramatically increased.

Fuente: Israel Targeting Palestinian Protesters on Facebook


“El Watergate es una ilusión diseñada por Hollywood”

“La gestión de los Papeles de Panamá es un ataque a nuestro modelo”, asegura el fundador de Wikileaks, muy crítico con el Consorcio Internacional de Periodistas de Investigación que ha publicado esta última gran filtración”Los medios establecidos tienen que limitarse constantemente bajo los poderes del establishment, los poderes del Estado al que pertenecen”, dice Assange en esta entrevista con eldiario.es en la Embajada de Ecuador en Londres

Fuente: “El Watergate es una ilusión diseñada por Hollywood”


With Facebook No Longer a Secret Weapon, Egypt’s Protesters Turn to Signal

Although the police in Cairo sealed off parts of the Egyptian capital where protests scheduled on Facebook were to have taken place on Monday, opposition activists managed to stage brief rallies that resembled flash mobs, calling for an end to military rule and the cancellation of a deal to surrender two islands to Saudi Arabia.The fact that Facebook is now so closely monitored by the security forces prompted one leading activist to offer an online tutorial in how to use a new tool, the encrypted messaging app Signal, to help protesters find each other on the city’s streets, and stay one step ahead of the authorities.

Fuente: With Facebook No Longer a Secret Weapon, Egypt’s Protesters Turn to Signal


Pepper-sprayed students outraged as UC Davis tried to scrub incident from web | US news | The Guardian

The California university is being accused of censorship after paying a firm to try to hide references to the incident in which police sprayed protesters in 2011

Fuente: Pepper-sprayed students outraged as UC Davis tried to scrub incident from web | US news | The Guardian


Assange supporters condemn UK and Sweden in open letter | Media | The Guardian

Five hundred prominent names, including Ai Weiwei and Mairead Maguire, accuse countries of undermining UN human rights covenants

Fuente: Assange supporters condemn UK and Sweden in open letter | Media | The Guardian


Exigimos respuesta al retiro de notas sobre protesta del caso Narvarte

El domingo 29 de noviembre, varios medios de comunicación retiraron, bajo presión gubernamental, notas relacionadas con una protesta por los asesinatos de la colonia Narvarte. De acuerdo a informantes, el vocero del gobierno de la Ciudad de México exigió, además de la remoción de notas, un castigo para los fotógrafos que participaron en la protesta. Los medios han mantenido un silencio cómplice sobre el retiro de las notas, sin aclarar las razones por las que quitaron la información de sus sitios web.

Fuente: Exigimos respuesta al retiro de notas sobre protesta del caso Narvarte


Is the online surveillance of black teenagers the new stop-and-frisk? | US news | The Guardian

Is the online surveillance of black teenagers the new stop-and-frisk? | US news | The Guardian.

police gangs surveillance Stop-and-frisk was found unconstitutional in 2013. Illustration: Rob Dobi

Taylonn Murphy is sitting in a Harlem beauty salon after hours. Leaning back in his chair and with a calm demeanor, he is talking about keeping young local people out of harm’s way.

Every now and then though, as he speaks, his voice breaks.

In September 2011, his daughter Tayshana, 18, a local basketball superstar and resident of West Harlem’s Grant Houses, was shot dead by two residents of Manhattanville Houses. The killing was described as the result of a rivalry between the two housing projects that dates back decades.

Almost three years after his daughter’s death, on 4 June 2014, helicopters hovered overhead as the first rays of sunlight hit the concrete. At least 400 New York police officers in military gear raided both housing projects, with indictments for the arrest of 103 people.

Starting in January 2010, the community’s children and young adults had been closely watched by police officers – both online and off. The investigation had involved listening in to 40,000 calls from correctional facilities, watching hours of surveillance video, and reviewing over 1m online social media pages.

For Murphy, the revelation of these details was choking: the NYPD had been attentively surveilling both communities for over one and a half years before his daughter was murdered, patiently waiting and observing as the rivalry between crew members escalated.

Online surveillance: the new stop-and-frisk?

In 2013, stop-and-frisk was found unconstitutional by a federal judge for its use of racial profiling. Since then, logged instances have dropped from an astonishing 685,000 in 2011 to just 46,000 in 2014. But celebrations may be premature, with local policing increasingly moving off the streets and migrating online.

In 2012, the NYPD declared a war on gangs across the city with Operation Crew Cut. The linchpin of the operation’s activities is the sweeping online surveillance of individuals as young as 10 years old deemed to be members of crews and gangs.

This move is being criticized by an increasing number of community members and legal scholars, who see it as an insidious way of justifying the monitoring of young men and boys of color in low-income communities.


Aaron Swartz stood up for freedom and fairness – and was hounded to his death | Comment is free | The Guardian

Aaron Swartz stood up for freedom and fairness – and was hounded to his death | Comment is free | The Guardian.

Internet activist Aaron Swartz in a San Francisco bookshop in 2008, five years before his suicide.

 Internet activist Aaron Swartz in a San Francisco bookshop in 2008, five years before his suicide. Photograph: Noah Berger/Reuters

On Monday, BBC Four screened a remarkable film in its Storyville series. The Internet’s Own Boy told the story of the life and tragic death of Aaron Swartz, the leading geek wunderkind of his generation who was hounded to suicide at the age of 26 by a vindictive US administration. The film is still available on BBC iPlayer, and if you do nothing else this weekend make time to watch it, because it’s the most revealing source of insights about how the state approaches the internet since Edward Snowden first broke cover.

To say Swartz was a prodigy is an understatement. As an unknown teenager he was a co-designer of tools – like RSS and Markdown and of services like Reddit – that shaped the evolution of the web. He was also the kid who wrote most of the code underpinning Creative Commons, an inspired system that uses copyright law to give ordinary people control over how their digital creations can be used by others.

But Swartz was far more than an immensely-gifted programmer. The Storyville film includes home movies which show the entrancing, voraciously-inquisitive toddler who was father to the man. As he grew, he displayed the same open, questioning attitude to life one sees in other geniuses who are always asking “why?” and “why not?” and driving normal people nuts.


The Pirate Bay vuelve a estar disponible “como el ave Fenix” – BioBioChile

The Pirate Bay vuelve a estar disponible “como el ave Fenix” – BioBioChile.


The Pirate Bay

The Pirate Bay

Publicado por Eduardo Woo
Tras cerrar en diciembre por orden judicial, The Pirate Bay ha regresado de sus cenizas cual ave Fénix, según se puede ver en su portada que deja el clásico barco pirata.

Con su dominio original, el sitio regresó este 1 de febrero con todos los links a archivos de descarga, sean películas, series, libros, música, entre otros documentos.

El caso recuerda lo ocurrido con MegaUpload, que también cerró tras una investigación judicial, pero luego retornó con el nombre de Mega y mucho más recargado, con funciones de encriptado y correo.

Otro que debió cerrar a fines de 2014 fue SeriesPepito.com, el que sin embargo retornó aunque con otro dominio en Tonga.

Todos los casos anteriores han sido esfuerzos de la industria del entretenimiento de intentar eliminar estos sitios de intercambio de archivos, ante los millones y millones de dólares que les supone en pérdidas.


The Pirate Bay Is Back Online! | TorrentFreak

The Pirate Bay Is Back Online! | TorrentFreak.

The Pirate Bay has risen from its digital ashes once again. TPB is back online today, more than seven weeks after its servers were raided . The notorious torrent site is operating from the familiar .se domain and it appears that data loss is minimal.

pirate bayEarly December The Pirate Bay was raided at the Nacka station, a nuclear-proof data center built into a mountain complex near Stockholm.

After being down for two weeks the domain came back online waving a pirate flag on its temporary homepage.

TPB later added a countdown to February 1st, alongside several hints that the site would reappear that day.

Today we can report that The Pirate Bay has lived up to the comeback expectations, with a comeback one day ahead of schedule.


The Pirate Bay set to return on 1 February | Technology | The Guardian

The Pirate Bay set to return on 1 February | Technology | The Guardian.

Pirate Bay phoenix
 The Pirate Bay appears set to sail again on 1 February like a phoenix from the ashes of a police raid. Photograph: Screengrab

Pirate Bay’s revival seems certain after the torrent site has started to display a logo of phoenix with a timer counting down to 1 February.

The timer was unveiled last week along with a revived but non-functioning site. Now the phoenix, a symbol of rebirth used by the Pirate Bay in previous relaunches of the site, has replaced the iconic battleship logo and the animated waving pirate flag.

On the homepage, the Pirate Bay battleship travels towards a cartoon of an island harbour named “welcome home”, now positioned overlapping the island.


I'm an Anonymous hacker in prison, and I am not a crook. I'm an activist | Jeremy Hammond | Comment is free | theguardian.com

I’m an Anonymous hacker in prison, and I am not a crook. I’m an activist | Jeremy Hammond | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

We may have hacked Sony back in the day, but we are still a social justice movement, from economic inequality to police brutality. Hacktivism is still the future

guy fawkes mask protest
People like Barrett Brown get it. People like Sabu don’t: we are gaining street protest experience and political maturity. Photograph: Noah Berger/Reuters

Here in prison, I am asked a lot about hacking and especially about Anonymous, because of course there is interest in new technologies like Bitcoin for money or darknets for fraud. After all, convicts – like hackers – develop their own codes and ethics, and they are constantly finding ways to scam and exploit cracks in the system.

The anti-government message of Anonymous rings true among prisoners who have been railroaded, condemned and warehoused. So when they hear about hacked government websites and cops getting doxed, my fellow inmates often tell me things like, “It’s good to see people finally doing something about it.” That rejection of established, reformist avenues for achieving social change is why Anonymous continues as a force to be reckoned with, made all the more obvious by the presence of Guy Fawkes masks at the protests in Ferguson, Missouri – and beyond.

Hackers are a controversial, chaotic and commonly misunderstood bunch. Many of us have been arrested, from Mercedes Haefer and Andrew Auernheimer to Mustafa Al-Bassam and more, and few outside observers get that Anonymous is not a monolithic entity but a wide spectrum of backgrounds, politics and tactics. The journalist Barrett Brown gets it, but he continues to await his sentencing for merely linking to hacked material. And so I’ve been sharing a new book with my fellow inmates by the anthropologist and author Gabriella Coleman called Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy: The Many Faces of Anonymous.


Court rejects attempt to allow Edward Snowden into Germany | US news | The Guardian

Court rejects attempt to allow Edward Snowden into Germany | US news | The Guardian.

Opposition parties wanted Snowden to give evidence in person to a parliamentary committee investigating NSA espionage

 

 

Edward Snowden
Edward Snowden. Photograph: Guardian

 

Attempts by opposition parties in Germany to bring Edward Snowden to Berlin to give evidence about the NSA’s operations have been thwarted by the country’s highest court.

 

The Green and Left parties wanted the whistleblower to give evidence in person to a parliamentary committee investigating espionage by the US agency, but Germany’s constitutional court ruled against them on Friday.

 

The government has argued that Snowden’s presence in Germany could impair relations with the US and put it under pressure to extradite him.

 

It has suggested sending the committee – which consists of eight MPs – to interview him in Moscow, where Snowden is living in exile. Snowden has said through a lawyer that he is prepared to speak to the panel only if permitted to do so in Germany.


Swedish police raid sinks The Pirate Bay | Technology | The Guardian

Swedish police raid sinks The Pirate Bay | Technology | The Guardian.

the pirate bay logo

 The Pirate Bay has been taken offline by police raids in Sweden. Photograph: The Pirate Bay

Swedish police have raided and seized computer and server equipment in Stockholm, taking the notorious piracy site the Pirate Bay offline.

The site, which has survived the arrest and jailing of its founders, several attempts to remove it from the internet and blockade by internet service providers (ISPs) in the UK and internationally, has been unavailable for more than 24 hours.

“We had a crackdown on a server room in greater Stockholm because of a copyright infringement, and yes it was Pirate Bay,” said Paul Pinter, national co-ordinator for intellectual property crime at Stockholm County Police.

He said that Rights Alliance, a Swedish anti-piracy group, had made the complaint. Sara Lindback, its head, said that Pirate Bay was “an illegal commercial service” making “considerable earnings by infringing the works of others”.

Servers and computers seized

Sources quoted by BitTorrent news site TorrentFreak have confirmed that the servers seized in the raid belonged to the Pirate Bay. Despite several sites appearing to be the piracy site briefly coming back online, it has not yet been resurrected.

Several sites affiliated with the Pirate Bay, including EZTV, Zoink, Torrage, Istole, bayimg.com, pastebay.net and Pirate Bay’s internet forum suprbay.org, have also been taken offline.

Fredrik Ingblad, a Swedish intellectual property crime prosecutor, said: “There were a number of police officers and digital forensics experts there. This took place during the morning and continued until this afternoon. Several servers and computers were seized, but I cannot say exactly how many.”

It is not known whether Swedish authorities also seized the Pirate Bay domain names as part of their action against the piracy site.

The Pirate Bay has been blocked at the ISP level in the UK since 2012. Users of the site have been able to circumvent the court-ordered block by accessing proxy sites, which replicate the Pirate Bay services and pull data from the main site when a user accesses them operating as a relay.

Many of these proxy sites are still operating despite the primary Pirate Bay site being taken offline, but they have no data of their own and are essentially crippled by the removal of the Pirate Bay from the internet.


Entrevista a Julian Assange, fundador de Wikileaks: “Google nos espía e informa al Gobierno de Estados Unidos”

Entrevista a Julian Assange, fundador de Wikileaks: “Google nos espía e informa al Gobierno de Estados Unidos”.

Escrito por Ignacio Ramonet / Le Monde Diplomatique
Lunes, 01 de Diciembre de 2014 11:59

Desde hace treinta meses, Julian Assange, paladín de la lucha por una información libre, vive en Londres, refugiado en las oficinas de la Embajada de Ecuador. Este país latinoamericano tuvo el coraje de brindarle asilo diplomático cuando el fundador de WikiLeaks se hallaba perseguido y acosado por el Gobierno de Estados Unidos y varios de sus aliados (el Reino Unido, Suecia). El único crimen de Julian Assange es haber dicho la verdad y haber difundido, vía WikiLeaks, entre otras revelaciones, las siniestras realidades ocultas de las guerras de Irak y de Afganistán, y los tejemanejes e intrigas de la diplomacia estadounidense.

Como Edward Snowden, Chelsea Manning y Glenn Greenwald, Julian Assange forma parte de un nuevo grupo de disidentes que, por descubrir la verdad, son ahora rastreados, perseguidos y hostigados no por regímenes autoritarios sino por Estados que pretenden ser “democracias ejemplares”…

En su nuevo libro, Cuando Google encontró a WikiLeaks (Clave Intelectual, Madrid, 2014), cuya versión en español está en librerías desde el 1 de diciembre, Julian Assange va más lejos en sus revelaciones, estupendamente documentadas, como siempre. Todo parte de una larga conversación que Assange sostuvo, en junio de 2011, con Eric Schmidt, presidente ejecutivo de Google. Este vino a entrevistar al creador de WikiLeaks para un ensayo que estaba preparando sobre el futuro de la era digital. Cuando se publicó el libro, titulado The New Digital Era (2013), Assange constató que sus declaraciones habían sido tergiversadas y que las tesis defendidas por Schmidt eran considerablemente delirantes y megalomaníacas. El nuevo libro del fundador de WikiLeaks es su respuesta a esas elucubraciones del presidente de Google. Entre muchas otras cosas, Assange revela cómo Google –y Facebook, y Amazon, etc.– nos espía y nos vigila; y cómo transmite esa información a las agencias de inteligencia de Estados Unidos. Y cómo la empresa líder en tecnologías digitales tiene una estrecha relación, casi estructural, con el Departamento de Estado. Afirma también Assange, que hoy, las grandes empresas de la galaxia digital nos vigilan y nos controlan más que los propios Estados.

Cuando Google encontró a WikiLeaks es una obra inteligente, estimulante y necesaria. Una fiesta para el espíritu. Nos abre los ojos sobre nuestras propias prácticas de comunicación cotidianas cuando usamos un smartphone, una tablet, un ordenador o cuando navegamos simplemente por Internet con la candidez de quien se cree más libre que nunca. ¡Ojo! Nos explica Assange, como Pulgarcito, vas sembrando rastros de ti mismo y de tu vida privada que algunas empresas, como Google, recogen con sumo cuidado y archivan secretamente. Un día, las utilizarán contra ti…

Para conversar de todo esto y de algunas cosas más, nos encontramos con un Julian Assange entusiasta y fatigado, en Londres, el pasado 24 de octubre, en una pequeña sala acogedora de la Embajada de Ecuador. Llega sonriente y pálido, con una barba rubia de varios días, con su cabeza de ángel prerrafaelista, cabellos largos, rasgos finos, ojos claros… Es alto y delgado. Habla con voz muy baja y lenta. Lo que dice es profundo y pensado, le sale de muy adentro. Tiene un algo de gurú… Habíamos previsto charlar no más de media hora, para no cansarlo, pero con el paso del tiempo la conversación se fue poniendo interesante. Y finalmente hablamos más de dos horas y media…


Jacob Appelbaum: "La criptografía es una cuestión de justicia social"

Jacob Appelbaum: “La criptografía es una cuestión de justicia social”.

Appelbaum, una de las caras visibles del proyecto TOR, reclama que la sociedad sea consciente de que debe protegerse de los abusos del Estado con tecnología y nuevas leyes

“Están intentando asustar a la sociedad y decir a la ciudadanía que el uso de estas herramientas es terrorífico, pero lo que no nos cuentan es cómo ellos utilizan los sistemas de vigilancia para matar gente”

“Con las revelaciones de Snowden simplemente hemos pasado de la teoría a la certeza”

 

 

Jacob Appelbaum | Foto: COP:DOX  http://cphdox.dk/sites/default/files/styles/title-top/public/title/24276.jpg?itok=tGB_VZdM

Jacob Appelbaum, investigador, hacker y miembro de Proyecto Tor | Foto: CPH:DOX

 

 

Cryptoparties hay muchas. Cientos de ellas se celebran cada hora en cualquier parte del mundo, en un café, en la parte trasera de una tienda o incluso off the radar si se trata de compartir conocimientos con activistas o periodistas que trabajan en condiciones de riesgo. Las hay que ya han pasado a la historia como la organizada en 2011 via Twitter por la activista austaliana Asher Wolf, considerada la chispa de lo que en apenas semanas pasó a convertirse en un movimiento social a escala global, o la promovida por un –entonces aún desconocido—  Edward Snowden en un hacklab de Hawái cuando aún trabajaba para la NSA, y apenas un mes antes de contactar con Laura Poitras para revelarle el mayor escándalo de espionaje masivo conocido hasta el momento.

Sin embargo, una cryptoparty que reúna en una misma sala, precisamente, a la confidente de Snowden y directora del documental Citizenfour, Poitras; al activista, experto en seguridad informática y desarrollador de TOR, Jacob Appelbaum; y a William Binney –exoficial de inteligencia de la NSA convertido en whistleblower más de una década antes de que Snowden lo hiciera— solo hay una: la celebrada la semana pasada en el Bremen Theater de Copenhague con motivo del estreno del documental de Poitras en el festival internacional de cine documental CPH: DOX.

“Hace diez años nadie hubiera pensado en organizar un evento para hablar de esto, hubieran pensado que estábamos locos” comenta Jacob Appelbaum, uno de los gurús de la criptografía, miembro del equipo desarrollador de TOR y activista implacable en la lucha contra los sistemas de vigilancia masivos empleados por los gobiernos de distintos países. Eso demuestra que algo ha cambiado. Y lo dice la persona que precisamente inició en esto de la criptografía a la mismísima Poitras, cuyos conocimientos (y trayectoria cinematográfica, que incluía un corto documental sobre William Binney) fueron determinantes cuando Snowden eligió a quién revelaría su preciado secreto, aunque como el propio Citizenfour prefiere plantearlo, ella misma se eligió.

“Había empezado a utilizar criptografía cuando comencé a comunicarme con Jake”, contó Poitras. “Estaba muy interesada en su trabajo entrenando a activistas alrededor del mundo en cómo sortear los sistemas de vigilancia. Así que tuve que cargarme las pilas, me bajé algunas herramientas, en concreto usaba dos: PGP Email y chat OTR”, las mismas herramientas que Snowden enseñó a instalar a Glenn Greenwald para poder comunicarse de forma segura.

“Recuerdo que mandé un email a Jake explicándole quién era y el documental en el que estaba trabajando. Enseguida me contestó y me dijo que teníamos verificar las fingerprints, yo no tenía ni idea de lo que estaba hablando, así que me hice la entendida, le pedí unos minutos para ganar tiempo y me puse a buscar online de qué iba eso de las fingerprints“. “La verdad es que fue muy buen profesor y luego me enseñó muchas más cosas, que luego aparentemente fueron bastante oportunas cuando en enero de 2013 recibí el primer email de un tal Citizenfour pidiéndome mi clave pública”.


Aprueban ley que obliga a almacenar datos de internet

Aprueban ley que obliga a almacenar datos de internet.

Aprueban  ley que obliga a almacenar datos de internet

Objetivo. La ley pretende poder ubicar desde qué computadora se cometen los delitos.

 

 

La Cámara de Senadores aprobó ayer un proyecto de ley que obliga a las operadoras de internet a almacenar datos de tráfico (IP) por el periodo de un año, a fin de ubicar el origen de las publicaciones.

 

 

El proyecto, que fue presentado en la sesión ordinaria por el senador Arnaldo Giuzzio, se aprobó con modificaciones tras la objeción por parte de algunos parlamentarios del punto en que indicaba quién podía requerir esta información, debido que se temía que pueda ser utilizado de manera irresponsable.

El texto original indicaba en su artículo primero que estos datos podían ser requeridos por “la autoridad competente, juez y fiscal, cuando lo requieran” y en el artículo séptimo establecía que la entrega de los datos debía realizarse “al Ministerio Público o Juzgado competente”.

Tras la objeción por parte de algunos legisladores, entre ellos la senadora de Desirée Masi, finalmente se estableció que se especifica que se podrá realizar el pedido solo a través de un juez.

Fines. Giuzzio indicó que de todos los casos investigados por pornografía infantil, el 80 por ciento no avanzan porque la falta de almacenamiento de IP por parte de las proveedoras de internet no permiten identificar a los autores del ilícito.

Comentó que con esta ley se podrá saber el origen de los mensajes en casos investigados por estafa mediante internet, e incluso en el combate al autodenominado Ejército del Pueblo Paraguayo (EPP).

Como ejemplo recordó el video del autodenominado EPP que se declaraba la autoría de la quema de una comisaría, donde la Fiscalía solicitó a la matriz de Facebook el origen del video, en Estados Unidos. El dato decía ‘Paraguay’, pero el IP no pudo ser identificado porque las operadoras no retenían la información, señaló.


Edward Snowden: winning Sweden’s alternative Nobel prize is vindication – video | World news | The Guardian

Edward Snowden: winning Sweden’s alternative Nobel prize is vindication – video | World news | The Guardian.

Edward Snowden issues a recorded statement after being awarded Sweden’s Right Livelihood Honorary Award, dubbed the ‘alternative Nobel Prize’. The National Security Agency whistleblower says he accepts the award on behalf of those who risked their lives to help ‘resist unlawful and disproportionate mass surveillance’. He says the award serves as a ‘vindication’ for such efforts

 


El pirata informático capturado por espiar el proceso de paz acusa al uribismo | Internacional | EL PAÍS

El pirata informático capturado por espiar el proceso de paz acusa al uribismo | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

Para el Centro Democrático, partido del expresidente Uribe, se trata de una “cortina de humo”

El candidato Óscar Ivan Zuluaga, en un acto de campaña. / J. VIZCAINO (REUTERS)

En plena campaña electoral en Colombia, hace casi cuatro meses, fue capturado Andrés Sepúlveda, un hombre experto en seguridad informática acusado de interceptar de manera ilegal comunicaciones sobre el proceso de paz entre la guerrilla de las FARC y el Gobierno de Santos. El escándalo también incluía su relación con el candidato del uribismo a la presidencia, Oscar Iván Zuluaga, para quien trabajaba en el manejo de redes sociales.

El hacker, que se decidió a colaborar con la justicia para recibir beneficios como una rebaja de la pena de prisión, se había mantenido en silencio hasta ahora. El domingo la revista Semana publicó una entrevista en la que confiesa que fue contratado por la campaña a la presidencia del Centro Democrático, partido del expresidente Álvaro Uribe y principal opositor de la negociación con las FARC, para obtener información de inteligencia de los diálogos que se llevan a cabo en Cuba desde noviembre de 2012. También para hacer guerra sucia contra algunos políticos.

En la entrevista, Sepúlveda se declaró como “más uribista que Uribe”, pero dijo que tomó la decisión de hablar porque se ha sentido abandonado e incluso dice que han intentado asesinarlo. “Cuando me di cuenta de todo me sentí usado, sentí que perdí 10 años de mi vida apoyando el uribismo, apoyando todo esto”, dice en un aparte de la entrevista con Semana.

Sepúlveda involucró al candidato Óscar Iván Zuluaga, a su hijo David y a su asesor más cercano, Luis Alfonso Hoyos. “El Centro Democrático era receptor de la información y no hay manera de que lo puedan negar. Si usted revisa las redes sociales verá que todos, absolutamente todos manejaban el mismo discurso, que incluso se lanzaron trending topics en Twitter creados por nosotros para hacer que se moviera más el tema”, explicó.


Kim Dotcom: from playboy entrepreneur to political firebrand | Technology | The Observer

Kim Dotcom: from playboy entrepreneur to political firebrand | Technology | The Observer.

He was the flamboyant founder of the popular Megaupload site. But when the US got New Zealand police to arrest him on charges of internet piracy, Kim Dotcom began a remarkable fightback
Kim Dotcom

‘Larger than life’: Kim Dotcom, entrepreneur, playboy, digital pioneer, fugitve and, now, revolutionary? Photograph: Hannah Johnston/Getty Images

There are no hot-tubs. No super-yachts. No models in bikinis. My first encounter with Kim Dotcom is disorienting in many respects, not least for the complete lack of luxury goods and inappropriately dressed women present. Before seeing him take to the stage in Christchurch, the largest city on New Zealand‘s South Island, my image of him has come almost solely from the internet: I’ve seen him posing next to fast cars, sitting on private jets, cavorting with hot chicks. I’ve seen him holding automatic weapons, gurning in front of helicopters and partying at his house, the so-called Dotcom Mansion, New Zealand’s most expensive private home, just outside Auckland. All 6ft 7in of him: a larger-than-life German-Finnish multimillionaire internet mogul-cum-international playboy for whom money, taste and conventional notions about what constitutes an obscene display of wealth have never been any object.

But at Christchurch’s cardboard cathedral, a striking temporary structure erected after the city’s devastating earthquakes, there are no babes or expensive consumer items. Kim Dotcom’s Twitter profile pic shows him as a shadowy figure in a black beret and sunglasses, but in the flesh he comes across less like an international fugitive from justice than a misplaced German exchange student. He’s 40, and dressed in black as he invariably is, but there’s still more of the teen geek about him than cyber outlaw being hunted by the FBI. Though that is exactly what he is: in the last two years, the founder of the file-sharing website Megauploadhas become, for many, an internet folk hero. The US government alleges he is a pirate, a career criminal who swindled the Hollywood studios out of their rightful copyright earnings, and they are desperately trying to extradite him from his adopted home in New Zealand to stand trial in the US, where he faces up to 88 years in jail. To others, younger people predominantly, he’s up there with Assange and Snowden: a web freedom fighter unwilling to kowtow to the US government’s bullying ways.


What Happens to #Ferguson Affects Ferguson: — The Message — Medium

What Happens to #Ferguson Affects Ferguson: — The Message — Medium.

Net Neutrality, Algorithmic Filtering and Ferguson

View image on Twitter

Ferguson is about many things, starting first with race and policing in America.

But it’s also about internet, net neutrality and algorithmic filtering.

It’s a clear example of why “saving the Internet”, as it often phrased, is not an abstract issue of concern only to nerds, Silicon Valley bosses, and few NGOs. It’s why “algorithmic filtering” is not a vague concern.

It’s a clear example why net neutrality is a human rights issue; a free speech issue; and an issue of the voiceless being heard, on their own terms.

I saw this play out in multiple countries — my home country of Turkey included — but last night, it became even more heartbreakingly apparent in the United States as well.

For me, last night’s Ferguson “coverage” began when people started retweeting pictures of armored vehicles with heavily armored “robocops” on top of them, aiming their muzzle at the protesters, who seemed to number a few hundred. It was the fourth night after an unarmed black man, Michael Brown, was shot by a — still unnamed — police officer after a “jaywalking” incident. Witnesses say he died hands in the air, saying “don’t shoot”.

Ferguson is about many things, starting first with race and policing in America.

But it’s also about internet, net neutrality and algorithmic filtering.

It’s a clear example of why “saving the Internet”, as it often phrased, is not an abstract issue of concern only to nerds, Silicon Valley bosses, and few NGOs. It’s why “algorithmic filtering” is not a vague concern.

It’s a clear example why net neutrality is a human rights issue; a free speech issue; and an issue of the voiceless being heard, on their own terms.

I saw this play out in multiple countries — my home country of Turkey included — but last night, it became even more heartbreakingly apparent in the United States as well.

For me, last night’s Ferguson “coverage” began when people started retweeting pictures of armored vehicles with heavily armored “robocops” on top of them, aiming their muzzle at the protesters, who seemed to number a few hundred. It was the fourth night after an unarmed black man, Michael Brown, was shot by a — still unnamed — police officer after a “jaywalking” incident. Witnesses say he died hands in the air, saying “don’t shoot”.


The Ethiopian bloggers charged as terrorists – Twitter Q&A | World news | theguardian.com

The Ethiopian bloggers charged as terrorists – Twitter Q&A | World news | theguardian.com.

A group of journalists and bloggers known as the Zone Nine collective have felt the full force of a government media crackdown. With their colleagues imprisoned awaiting trial they took over @guardianafrica to answer your questions

 

 

 

Ethiopian man waves Ethiopian flag
An Ethiopian flag. The government has been broadly criticised for its media crackdown and silencing a ‘once thriving’ blogosphere. Photograph: Tony Gentile/Reuters

 

Six members of Ethiopia’s blogging collective and three journalists, known as Zone Nine, are facing terrorism charges. In an alleged plot to “destabilise the nation” they stand accused of having links to banned rebel group Ginbot 7 and planning attacks.

The group have been imprisoned since April, with critics accusing the government of making unnecessary delays to the trial at their expense. There have been seven hearings and it emerged that the latest, due to be held this week, would be postponed until 20 August.

The Zone Nine mantra is “we blog because we care”. They became known for criticising the government and its policies. Last month, their colleagues mobilised online campaigners, asking them to use the hashtag #FreeZone9Bloggers to protest in favour of their release.

Freedom activists have criticised the detention of the bloggers. Responding to the court issuing the terror charge on the 18 July, Human Rights Watch said Ethiopia is making a “mockery of its own judicial system” and “hiding behind an abusive anti-terrorism law.”

A sustained government crackdown has crippled Ethiopia’s independent press and a briefly “thriving and energetic blogosphere” has been silenced by government censorship, says blogging website global voices. Freedom House categorises Ethiopia’s press as “not free”.

We invited two members of the blogging collective, Soliyana Shimeles and Endalk Chala to takeover @guardianafrica to answer your questions. Where does the case stand? How do they cope with censorship? And what do they hope for the future?