NSA Theft Suspect Worked For Contractor That Sells the Government Tech for Spotting Rogue Employees

Booz Allen Hamilton, the defense contracting giant whose employee was charged Wednesday in connection with the theft of hacking codes used by the National Security Agency, provides a fairly ironic service to the government: spotting rogue employees.

Fuente: NSA Theft Suspect Worked For Contractor That Sells the Government Tech for Spotting Rogue Employees


NSA contractor arrested for alleged theft of top secret classified information | US news | The Guardian

Shares183Save for laterThe FBI has arrested a National Security Agency contractor on suspicion of the theft of top secret classified data and documents in an alleged security breach at the same intelligence agency whose spy secrets were exposed by Edward Snowden.

Fuente: NSA contractor arrested for alleged theft of top secret classified information | US news | The Guardian


Washington Post says Obama should not pardon whistleblower Ed Snowden | Media | The Guardian

Newspaper criticised for calling for the criminal prosecution of its own source, on ‘whose back the paper won and eagerly accepted a Pulitzer Prize’

Fuente: Washington Post says Obama should not pardon whistleblower Ed Snowden | Media | The Guardian


Snowden desmiente su muerte en Twitter con una cita de Mark Twain – El Mostrador

“Las noticias sobre mi muerte han sido enormemente exageradas”, escribió Snowden en su cuenta de Twitter, en la que colgó una foto del escritor estadounidense, Mark Twain, al que pertenece la famosa cita.

Fuente: Snowden desmiente su muerte en Twitter con una cita de Mark Twain – El Mostrador


Cierran su cuenta de Twitter por publicar videos de Rio 2016 – FayerWayer

Luigino Bracci Roa es un activista venezolano con cierta popularidad en Twitter. Pero quizás olvidó leer las reglas impuestas por el Comité Olímpico Internacional (COI), respecto a la publicación de contenido de Rio 2016, en donde se prohíbe compartir cualquier cosa relacionada, si no se es patrocinador; pues su cuenta ha sido suspendida.

Fuente: Cierran su cuenta de Twitter por publicar videos de Rio 2016 – FayerWayer


ONU teme más atentados si intensifica guerra contra terrorismo en Siria e Irak – El Mostrador

Laborde insistió en la importancia de avanzar en el intercambio de información entre los servicios de inteligencia de los gobiernos para acelerar lo más posible la detección de individuos potencialmente peligrosos.En esa misma línea, abogó por profundizar los lazos entre la comunidad internacional y las grandes empresas tecnológicas para “ganar la batalla de la información y la interconexión”.

Fuente: ONU teme más atentados si intensifica guerra contra terrorismo en Siria e Irak – El Mostrador


Pepper-sprayed students outraged as UC Davis tried to scrub incident from web | US news | The Guardian

The California university is being accused of censorship after paying a firm to try to hide references to the incident in which police sprayed protesters in 2011

Fuente: Pepper-sprayed students outraged as UC Davis tried to scrub incident from web | US news | The Guardian


Should Twitter, Facebook and Google Executives be the Arbiters of What We See and Read? – The Intercept

Should Twitter, Facebook and Google Executives be the Arbiters of What We See and Read? – The Intercept.

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Featured photo - Should Twitter, Facebook and Google Executives be the Arbiters of What We See and Read?DEAUVILLE, FRANCE – MAY 26: (L-R) Herman Van Rompuy, president of the European Union, Mark Zuckerberg, founder of Facebook Inc. and Eric Schmidt, chairman of Google Inc. arrive for the internet session of the G8 summit on May 26, 2011 in Deauville, France. (Photo by Chris Ratcliffe – Pool/Getty Images)

There have been increasingly vocal calls for Twitter, Facebook and other Silicon Valley corporations to more aggressively police what their users are permitted to see and read. Last month in The Washington Post, for instance, MSNBC host Ronan Farrow demanded that social media companies ban the accounts of “terrorists” who issue “direct calls” for violence.

This week, the announcement by Twitter CEO Dick Costolo that the company would prohibit the posting of the James Foley beheading video and photos from it (and suspend the accounts of anyone who links to the video) met with overwhelming approval. What made that so significant, as The Guardian‘s James Ball noted today, was that “Twitter has promoted its free speech credentials aggressively since the network’s inception.” By contrast, Facebook has long actively regulated what its users are permitted to say and read; at the end of 2013, the company reversed its prior ruling and decided that posting of beheading videos would be allowed, but only if the user did not express support for the act.

Given the savagery of the Foley video, it’s easy in isolation to cheer for its banning on Twitter. But that’s always how censorship functions: it invariably starts with the suppression of viewpoints which are so widely hated that the emotional response they produce drowns out any consideration of the principle being endorsed.

It’s tempting to support criminalization of, say, racist views as long as one focuses on one’s contempt for those views and ignores the serious dangers of vesting the state with the general power to create lists of prohibited ideas. That’s why free speech defenders such as the ACLU so often represent and defend racists and others with heinous views in free speech cases: because that’s where free speech erosions become legitimized in the first instance when endorsed or acquiesced to.

The question posed by Twitter’s announcement is not whether you think it’s a good idea for people to see the Foley video. Instead, the relevant question is whether you want Twitter, Facebook and Google executives exercising vast power over what can be seen and read.

It’s certainly true, as defenders of Twitter have already pointed out, that as a legal matter, private actors – as opposed to governments – always possess and frequently exercise the right to decide which opinions can be aired using their property. Generally speaking, the public/private dichotomy is central to any discussions of the legality or constitutionality of “censorship.”


MIT se deslinda de responsabilidad en suicidio de cofundador de red social Reddit

http://www.biobiochile.cl/2013/07/31/mit-se-deslinda-de-responsabilidad-en-suicidio-de-cofundador-de-red-social-reddit.shtml
Miércoles 31 julio 2013 | 17:30 · Actualizado: 17:30

Instituto Tecnológico de Massachusetts | Fcb981 (CC)Instituto Tecnológico de Massachusetts | Fcb981 (CC)

Publicado por Francisca Rivas | La Información es de Agencia AFP

El Instituto Tecnológico de Massachusetts (MIT) publicó el martes un informe deslindando su responsabilidad en el suicidio del cofundador de la red social Reddit, Aaron Swartz, acusado de robar a esa prestigiosa universidad millones de artículos científicos y literarios.

“No hemos encontrado una bala de plata con la que el MIT podría simplemente haber evitado la tragedia”, señaló el texto.

Desde que Swartz fue detenido en enero de 2011, el MIT se mantuvo neutral sobre si debía ser procesado y no trató de influir en el manejo del caso, según el informe de un panel de revisión.


Manning conviction under Espionage Act worries civil liberties campaigners

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/jul/31/bradley-manning-espionage-act-civil-liberties

Private awaits sentencing in WikiLeaks case as one observer says: ‘Obama has managed to do what Nixon couldn’t’

Bradley Manning

Bradley Manning faces a maximum 60-year prison sentence. Photograph: Patrick Semansky/AP

Bradley Manning began his first day as a convict on Wednesday, after he was found guilty of 20 counts relating to the transmission of state secrets to WikiLeaks. Outside the courtroom, the consequences of what amounts to a major escalation in the US government’s war on whistleblowers are beginning to sink in.

Tuesday’s verdict was the first time under the Obama administration that any leaker of official secrets has been convicted under the 1917 Espionage Act – a criminal statute designed to ensnare actual spies and traitors working with foreign governments. The only other time in US history that an official has been found guilty at trial under the Act for passing classified information to the press involved a naval intelligence expert, Samuel Morison, in 1985.