EU could give police direct access to cloud data in wake of terror attacks | Technology | The Guardian

The European Union is seeking to make it easier for police and law enforcement agencies to retrieve electronic evidence from US tech firms, including directly from cloud storage.

Fuente: EU could give police direct access to cloud data in wake of terror attacks | Technology | The Guardian


The U.S. Has Ramped Up Airstrikes Against ISIS in Raqqa, and Syrian Civilians Are Paying the Price

Thanks to camera phones and social media, the deadly consequences of U.S. military operations are indeed being recorded, shared, and watched around the world on an unprecedented scale. But while civilian deaths are regularly reported in local media outlets in the Middle East, they are seldom reported in detail by international media.

Fuente: The U.S. Has Ramped Up Airstrikes Against ISIS in Raqqa, and Syrian Civilians Are Paying the Price


Campaign group to challenge UK over surrender of passwords at border control | Politics | The Guardian

The move comes after its international director, Muhammad Rabbani, a UK citizen, was arrested at Heathrow airport in November for refusing to hand over passwords. Rabbani, 35, has been detained at least 20 times over the past decade when entering the UK, under schedule 7 of terrorism legislation that provides broad search powers, but this was the first time he had been arrested.

Fuente: Campaign group to challenge UK over surrender of passwords at border control | Politics | The Guardian


Julian Assange confirms he is willing to travel to US after Manning decision | Media | The Guardian

WikiLeaks tweeted last week that Assange would agree to US extradition if Obama granted Manning clemency. Asked during a web broadcast on Thursday if he would now leave the embassy, Assange said: “I stand by everything I said, including the offer to go to the United States if Chelsea Manning’s sentence was commuted.”

Fuente: Julian Assange confirms he is willing to travel to US after Manning decision | Media | The Guardian


Chelsea Manning did the right thing. Finally, Barack Obama has too | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian

At the time of her revelations, she was the most important whistleblower since Daniel Ellsberg. Upon hearing the news today, Ellsberg said this: “Once in a while, someone does what they ought to do. Some go to prison for it, for seven years; some accept exile for life. But sometimes even a president does it. And today, it was Obama.”

Fuente: Chelsea Manning did the right thing. Finally, Barack Obama has too | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian


Edward Snowden’s leave to remain in Russia extended for three years | US news | The Guardian

Earlier on Wednesday, Maria Zakharova, a foreign ministry spokeswoman, wrote on Facebook that Snowden’s right to stay had recently been extended “by a couple of years”. Her post came in response to a suggestion from the former acting CIA director Michael Morell that Vladimir Putin might hand over Snowden to the US, despite there being no extradition treaty between the countries.

Fuente: Edward Snowden’s leave to remain in Russia extended for three years | US news | The Guardian


Julian Assange ready for US extradition, one of his lawyers suggests | Media | The Guardian

A lawyer for Julian Assange has indicated that the WikiLeaks founder is ready to face extradition to the US after Barack Obama commuted the sentence of US army whistleblower Chelsea Manning.

Fuente: Julian Assange ready for US extradition, one of his lawyers suggests | Media | The Guardian


Chelsea Manning’s prison sentence commuted by Barack Obama | US news | The Guardian

The White House insisted on Tuesday that Assange’s offer to submit to extradition if Obama “grants Manning clemency” did not influence the president’s action.

Fuente: Chelsea Manning’s prison sentence commuted by Barack Obama | US news | The Guardian


Obama libera a exsoldado que actuó como fuente en caso WikiLeaks

El presidente estadounidense, Barack Obama, conmutó la pena de prisión a quien fuera fuente de Wikileaks, Chelsea Manning.Según la información de la Casa Blanca, la exsoldado será liberada el próximo 17 de mayo, aunque se encontraba condenada a una pena de cárcel de 35 años.

Fuente: Obama libera a exsoldado que actuó como fuente en caso WikiLeaks


Chelsea Manning on Obama’s ‘shortlist’ to commute prison sentence – report | US news | The Guardian

Chelsea Manning, the army soldier who leaked state secrets in 2010 and has been imprisoned longer than any other official leaker in US history, has called on President Obama to show her clemency in the final days of his presidency, saying that this amounts to her last chance for freedom “for a very long time”.

Fuente: Chelsea Manning on Obama’s ‘shortlist’ to commute prison sentence – report | US news | The Guardian


Young Russian denies she aided election hackers: ‘I never work with douchebags’ | World news | The Guardian

Alisa Shevchenko is a talented young Russian hacker, known for working with companies to find vulnerabilities in their systems. She is also, the White House claims, guilty of helping Vladimir Putin interfere in the US election.

Fuente: Young Russian denies she aided election hackers: ‘I never work with douchebags’ | World news | The Guardian


Obama escalates anti-Russian campaign with new sanctions and threats – World Socialist Web Site

In an executive order accompanied by a series of official statements, US President Barack Obama has sharply escalated the campaign against Russia, based on unsubstantiated claims of Russian government hacking of the Democratic National Committee (DNC) and the Hillary Clinton campaign in the presidential election.

Fuente: Obama escalates anti-Russian campaign with new sanctions and threats – World Socialist Web Site


The hacking is 21st-century, but US-Russia relations are stuck in the past | Simon Jenkins | Opinion | The Guardian

While Moscow’s cyberwar capacity is cutting-edge, the flurry of expulsions and misguided sanctions simply rehash the mistakes of the cold war

Fuente: The hacking is 21st-century, but US-Russia relations are stuck in the past | Simon Jenkins | Opinion | The Guardian


En qué consisten las sanciones aprobadas por EE.UU. contra Rusia por los ciberataques ocurridos durante la campaña electoral – El Mostrador

La Casa Blanca aprobó severas medidas para castigar a Moscú por sus supuestos intentos de influir en las elecciones presidenciales de noviembre pasado. Donald Trump dijo que el país debe “ocuparse de cosas más grandes y mejores”, aunque anunció que se reunirá la próxima semana con los jefes de inteligencia para informarse sobre el caso.

Fuente: En qué consisten las sanciones aprobadas por EE.UU. contra Rusia por los ciberataques ocurridos durante la campaña electoral – El Mostrador


Obama Refuses to Pardon Edward Snowden. Trump’s New CIA Pick Wants Him Dead.

November 18 2016, 3:35 p.m.President Obama indicated on Friday that he won’t pardon NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, even as President-elect Donald Trump announced his pick to run the CIA: Kansas congressman Mike Pompeo, who has called for “the traitor Edward Snowden” to be executed.

Fuente: Obama Refuses to Pardon Edward Snowden. Trump’s New CIA Pick Wants Him Dead.


NSA contractor arrested for alleged theft of top secret classified information | US news | The Guardian

Shares183Save for laterThe FBI has arrested a National Security Agency contractor on suspicion of the theft of top secret classified data and documents in an alleged security breach at the same intelligence agency whose spy secrets were exposed by Edward Snowden.

Fuente: NSA contractor arrested for alleged theft of top secret classified information | US news | The Guardian


Chelsea Manning Sentenced to Solitary Confinement for Suicide Attempt

U.S. Army whistleblower Chelsea Manning has been sentenced to 14 days in solitary confinement — punishment the U.N. recognizes as torture — for charges related to her suicide attempt in July, and for possession of an unmarked book in her cell.

Fuente: Chelsea Manning Sentenced to Solitary Confinement for Suicide Attempt


German proposals could see refugees’ phones searched by police | World news | The Guardian

Checking smartphones of those without passports among measures announced by the interior minister, Thomas de Maizière

Fuente: German proposals could see refugees’ phones searched by police | World news | The Guardian


Chelsea Manning: ‘It is terrifying to face the government alone’ | US news | The Guardian

In an interview with Amnesty International, made exclusive to the Guardian ahead of its publication in the new book Here I Stand, Chelsea Manning describes her feelings of isolation while in the hands of the most powerful government in the world.

Fuente: Chelsea Manning: ‘It is terrifying to face the government alone’ | US news | The Guardian


Israel Targeting Palestinian Protesters on Facebook

Facebook represents a new battleground in the long-running Israel-Palestinian conflict. Israeli officials blame social media for inciting violence, and arrests of Palestinians for Facebook posts have dramatically increased.

Fuente: Israel Targeting Palestinian Protesters on Facebook


ONU teme más atentados si intensifica guerra contra terrorismo en Siria e Irak – El Mostrador

Laborde insistió en la importancia de avanzar en el intercambio de información entre los servicios de inteligencia de los gobiernos para acelerar lo más posible la detección de individuos potencialmente peligrosos.En esa misma línea, abogó por profundizar los lazos entre la comunidad internacional y las grandes empresas tecnológicas para “ganar la batalla de la información y la interconexión”.

Fuente: ONU teme más atentados si intensifica guerra contra terrorismo en Siria e Irak – El Mostrador


Chelsea Manning wins free speech award: ‘It’s easy to feel invisible’ – video | US news | The Guardian

Chelsea Manning, currently in a maximum security prison in Kansas, is awarded the Blueprint for Free Speech prize

Fuente: Chelsea Manning wins free speech award: ‘It’s easy to feel invisible’ – video | US news | The Guardian


Mis nueve meses en régimen de aislamiento fueron una tortura “sin contacto”

En 2010, el ejército estadounidense detuvo a una de sus analistas de inteligencia por filtrar documentos clasificados sobre las guerras de Irak y Afganistán a Wikileaks; hoy cumple una condena de 35 años de prisión. “Me llevaron a un solitario agujero negro de confinamiento. Dos semanas después empecé a pensar en suicidarme”, recuerda.

Fuente: Mis nueve meses en régimen de aislamiento fueron una tortura “sin contacto”


US warns of risks from deeper encryption – FT.com

US warns of risks from deeper encryption – FT.com.

 

Jeh Johnson©Getty

Jeh Johnson

The head of the US Department of Homeland Security has warned the cyber security industry that encryption poses “real challenges” for law enforcement.

In a speech at a cyber security conference, RSA in San Francisco, Jeh Johnson called on the industry to find a solution that protected “the basic physical security of the American people” and the “liberties and freedoms we cherish”.

“The current course on deeper and deeper encryption is one that presents real challenges for those in law enforcement and national security,” he said.He said he understood the importance of encryption for privacy but asked the audience to imagine what it would have meant for law enforcement if, after the invention of the telephone, all the police could search was people’s letters.

Mr Johnson’s comments echo those of FBI director James Comey who called on Congress last year to stop the rise of encryption where no one held a key and so law enforcement agencies could not unlock it.

In the UK, the director of GCHQ criticised US technology companies last year for becoming “the command and control networks of choice” for terrorists by protecting communications. Across Europe, police forces have become concerned by their inability to track the communications of people who plan to travel to the Middle East to join the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (Isis).

 


EE UU incorpora los ciberataques a su programa de sanciones | Internacional | EL PAÍS

EE UU incorpora los ciberataques a su programa de sanciones | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

 

Obama, el martes en el Despacho Oval. / Susan Walsh (AP)

Aquellas personas o grupos que participen en ataques cibernéticos contra Estados Unidos podrán ser sancionadas del mismo modo que lo son quienes colaboran con la injerencia rusa en Ucrania o con el régimen sirio. En un reflejo de su creciente preocupación por las amenazas virtuales, la Casa Blanca incorporó este miércoles la ciberseguridad a la diplomacia de sanciones que aplica en todo el mundo.

El presidente Barack Obama aprobó una orden ejecutiva, que no requiere del voto del Congreso, que permite por primera vez imponer penalizaciones a los individuos o grupos ubicados fuera de EE UU que perpetren ataques o espionajes cibernéticos “maliciosos” que supongan una “amenaza significativa” a la seguridad nacional, la política exterior, la economía o la estabilidad financiera de la primera potencia mundial.

Esas actividades podrán ser consideradas a partir de ahora una “emergencia nacional”, basándose en una ley de 1977. El Departamento del Tesoro podrá congelar los activos de esas personas o entidades en EE UU e impedir determinadas transacciones financieras con compañías estadounidenses, siguiendo el mismo patrón que en las sanciones diplomáticas convencionales.


US Threatened Germany Over Snowden, Vice Chancellor Says – The Intercept

US Threatened Germany Over Snowden, Vice Chancellor Says – The Intercept.

Featured photo - US Threatened Germany Over Snowden, Vice Chancellor Says

German Vice Chancellor Sigmar Gabriel (above) said this week in Homburg that the U.S. government threatened to cease sharing intelligence with Germany if Berlin offered asylum to NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden or otherwise arranged for him to travel to that country. “They told us they would stop notifying us of plots and other intelligence matters,” Gabriel said.

The vice chancellor delivered a speech in which he praised the journalists who worked on the Snowden archive, and then lamented the fact that Snowden was forced to seek refuge in “Vladimir Putin’s autocratic Russia” because no other nation was willing and able to protect him from threats of imprisonment by the U.S. government (I was present at the event to receive an award). That prompted an audience member to interrupt his speech and yell out: “Why don’t you bring him to Germany, then?”

There has been a sustained debate in Germany over whether to grant asylum to Snowden, and a major controversy arose last year when a Parliamentary Committee investigating NSA spying divided as to whether to bring Snowden to testify in person, and then narrowly refused at the behest of the Merkel government. In response to the audience interruption, Gabriel claimed that Germany would be legally obligated to extradite Snowden to the U.S. if he were on German soil.

Afterward, however, when I pressed the vice chancellor (who is also head of the Social Democratic Party, as well as the country’s economy and energy minister) as to why the German government could not and would not offer Snowden asylum — which, under international law, negates the asylee’s status as a fugitive — he told me that the U.S. government had aggressively threatened the Germans that if they did so, they would be “cut off” from all intelligence sharing. That would mean, if the threat were carried out, that the Americans would literally allow the German population to remain vulnerable to a brewing attack discovered by the Americans by withholding that information from their government.


Latest FBI Claim of Disrupted Terror Plot Deserves Much Scrutiny and Skepticism – The Intercept

Latest FBI Claim of Disrupted Terror Plot Deserves Much Scrutiny and Skepticism – The Intercept.

BY GLENN GREENWALD AND ANDREW FISHMAN 

Featured photo - Latest FBI Claim of Disrupted Terror Plot Deserves Much Scrutiny and Skepticism

The Justice Department on Wednesday issued a press release trumpeting its latest success in disrupting a domestic terrorism plot, announcing that “the Joint Terrorism Task Force has arrested a Cincinnati-area man for a plot to attack the U.S. Capitol and kill government officials.” The alleged would-be terrorist is 20-year-old Christopher Cornell (above), who is unemployed, lives at home, spends most of his time playing video games in his bedroom, still addresses his mother as “Mommy” and regards his cat as his best friend; he was described as “a typical student” and “quiet but not overly reserved” by the principal of the local high school he graduated in 2012.

The affidavit filed by an FBI investigative agent alleges Cornell had “posted comments and information supportive of [ISIS] through Twitter accounts.” The FBI learned about Cornell from an unnamed informant who, as the FBI put it, “began cooperating with the FBI in order to obtain favorable treatment with respect to his criminal exposure on an unrelated case.” Acting under the FBI’s direction, the informant arranged two in-person meetings with Cornell where they allegedly discussed an attack on the Capitol, and the FBI says it arrested Cornell to prevent him from carrying out the attack.

Family members say Cornell converted to Islam just six months ago and claimed he began attending a small local mosque. Yet The Cincinnati Enquirer could not find a single person at that mosque who had ever seen him before, and noted that a young, white, recent convert would have been quite conspicuous at a mosque largely populated by “immigrants from West Africa,” many of whom “speak little or no English.”

The DOJ’s press release predictably generated an avalanche of scary media headlines hailing the FBI. CNN: “FBI says plot to attack U.S. Capitol was ready to go.” MSNBC: “US terror plot foiled by FBI arrest of Ohio man.” Wall St. Journal: “Ohio Man Charged With Plotting ISIS-Inspired Attack on U.S. Capitol.”

Just as predictably, political officials instantly exploited the news to justify their powers of domestic surveillance. House Speaker John Boehner claimed yesterday that “the National Security Agency’s snooping powers helped stop a plot to attack the Capitol and that his colleagues need to keep that in mind as they debate whether to renew the law that allows the government to collect bulk information from its citizens.” He warned: “We live in a dangerous country, and we get reminded every week of the dangers that are out there.” 


Saudi blogger Raif Badawi’s case referred to supreme court, says his wife | World news | The Guardian

Saudi blogger Raif Badawi’s case referred to supreme court, says his wife | World news | The Guardian.


King said to have stepped in amid flogging clamour as second round of 50 lashes delayed on health grounds

Protesters call for the release of Raif Badawi outside the Saudi embassy in The Hague, Netherlands
Protesters call for the release of Raif Badawi outside the Saudi embassy in The Hague, Netherlands. Photograph: Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto/Rex

The wife of the Saudi blogger Raif Badawi, who was sentenced to 1,000 lashes for criticising leading clerics, says King Abdullah has referred his case to the supreme court amid an international clamour over his flogging.

Ensaf Haidar, who lives in Canada with the couple’s three children, told the BBC the decision had raised hopes that the authorities wanted to end her husband’s punishment. But there has been no official statement from the Saudi government.

The authorities had already postponed Badawi’s flogging on medical grounds after a doctor said wounds from a previous lashing had not healed. Campaigners said the move exposed the “outrageous inhumanity” of his punishment.


Saudi blogger faces next 50 lashes as government ignores global protests | World news | The Guardian

Saudi blogger faces next 50 lashes as government ignores global protests | World news | The Guardian.

 

Wife of Raif Badawi says he may not be able to withstand more punishment as second installment of 1,000-lash sentence nears

 

Raif Badawi with his children
Saudi blogger Raif Badawi with his children. Photograph: Handout

Raif Badawi, the Saudi liberal convicted of publishing a blog, has been told he will again be flogged 50 times on Friday – the second part of his 1,000-lash sentence which also includes a 10-year jail term.

The US, Britain and other western governments had all called for the punishment to be dropped but there has been no sign of any diplomatic action against Riyadh. Amnesty International on Wednesday urged the UK government to challenge Saudi Arabia, which has ignored all protests over the case.

Badawi will be given 50 more lashes outside a mosque in his home city of Jeddah unless a Saudi prison doctor determines he is not yet fit to face the punishment owing to injuries sustained last Friday. If nothing changes, he will be flogged every Friday for the next 19 weeks.


Global outrage at Saudi Arabia as jailed blogger receives public flogging | World news | The Guardian

Global outrage at Saudi Arabia as jailed blogger receives public flogging | World news | The Guardian.

Kingdom stays silent as protesters contrast its opposition to Paris attacks on free speech with its own attacks on free speech
US Secratery of State John Kerry (2L) an
US secretary of state John Kerry attends a Gulf Cooperation Council meeting in Jeddah. Saudi Arabia is a strategic ally of the US and UK. Photograph: Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Saudi Arabia is remaining silent in the face of global outrage at the public flogging of the jailed blogger Raif Badawi, who received the first 50 of 1,000 lashes on Friday, part of his punishment for running a liberal website devoted to freedom of speech in the conservative kingdom.

Anger at the flogging – carried out as the world watched the bloody denouement of the Charlie Hebdo and Jewish supermarket jihadi killings in Paris – focused on a country that is a strategic ally, oil supplier and lucrative market for the US, Britain and other western countries but does not tolerate criticism at home.

Badawi was shown on a YouTube video being beaten in a square outside a mosque in Jeddah, watched by a crowd of several hundred who shouted “Allahu Akbar” (God is great) and clapped and whistled after the flogging ended. Badawi made no sound during the flogging and was able to walk back unaided afterwards.

“Raif was escorted from a bus and placed in the middle of the crowd, guarded by eight or nine officers,” a witness told Amnesty International.

“He was handcuffed and shackled but his face was not covered. A security officer approached him from behind with a huge cane and started beating him.

“Raif raised his head towards the sky, closing his eyes and arching his back. He was silent, but you could tell from his face and his body that he was in real pain.”

Badawi’s wife, Ensaf Haidar, told the Guardian from Montreal on Sunday: “Many governments around the world have protested about my husband’s case. I was optimistic until the last minute before the flogging. But the Saudi government is behaving like Daesh [a derogatory Arabic name for Islamic State or Isis].”

Saudi Arabia joined other Arab and Muslim countries in condemning the murder of 12 people at the Paris satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo but angry comments highlighted its double standard in meting out a cruel punishment to a man who was accused of insulting Islam.


Charges of China’s military hacking into corporate America piling up | Ars Technica

Charges of China’s military hacking into corporate America piling up | Ars Technica.

US appears powerless to bring Chinese soldier hackers to justice.

China’s military broke into Pentagon contractors’ computer networks at least 50 times—hacks that threaten “to erode US military technical superiority,” according to a federal investigation.

The Senate Arms Services Committee found that nearly two dozen intrusions were of the well-orchestrated “advanced persistent threat” variety. The yearlong probe [PDF] blamed the Chinese government for hacks targeting civilian transportation companies that the US military employs for the movement of troops and equipment. According to the investigation, hackers from the People’s Liberation Army started in 2012 and put malware onto an airline’s computers, stealing computer codes, e-mail, documents, and user accounts from firms the government declined to name.

“These peacetime intrusions into the networks of key defense contractors are more evidence of China’s aggressive actions in cyberspace,” said committee chairman Sen. Carl Levin (D-Mich.)

The latest developments follow a June report from US security firm CrowdStrike that detailed allegations of hacking by the People’s Liberation Army into aerospace, satellite, and defense companies in Europe, Japan, and the US. What’s more, Attorney General Eric Holder said in May that “enough is enough” at a news conference when he announced the indictment of five Chinese military personnel accused of hacking into major US corporations and stealing trade secrets.

While Holder promised to bring the five to the US for trial, the Associated Press reported Wednesday that the defendants “are believed to be living freely” in China. The targeted companies, ranging from Alcoa to Westinghouse, were allegedly attacked between 2006 to 2014, and China got away with trade secrets connected to everything from nuclear to renewable energy, according to the indictment.


James Foley and the daily horrors of the internet: think hard before clicking | James Ball | Comment is free | theguardian.com

James Foley and the daily horrors of the internet: think hard before clicking | James Ball | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

Outcry over footage of Foley’s apparent beheading raises difficult questions about editorial ethics – and our own choices

 

 

James Foley in Syria in 2012
James Foley in 2012. In a statement on his Facebook page, his mother said: ‘We have never been prouder of our son Jim. He gave his life trying to expose the world to the suffering of the Syrian people.’ Photograph: Nicole Tung/AP

 

With depressing frequency in this summer of diverse horrors, we hear tales of desperate human misery, suffering and depravity – and because we live now in an era where virtually every phone is a globally connected camera, we are confronted with graphic evidence of tragedy.

 

The footage of the apparent beheading (to refer to the atrocity as an execution serves only to lend a veneer of dignity to barbarism) of the US photojournalist James Foley at the hands of a British Isis extremist has raised particularly strong feelings.

 

Social networks are banning users who share the footage. Newspapers are facing opprobrium for the choices they make in showing stills or parts of the video. Others, of course, will seek out the video after seeing the row, or else post it around the internet in a juvenile form of the free speech argument.

 

Before considering the rights and wrongs of the position, there is one fact we should face: we are presented with images of grotesque violence on a daily basis. Last month the New York Times ran on its front page the dead and broken body of a Palestinian child.

 

Like Foley, that child was someone’s son, someone’s brother, someone’s friend, and in a connected world there is just as much chance his family saw the photo and its spread as Foley’s will see the latest awful images of their loved one.

 

That photo raised little controversy in comparison to the use of images of Foley. Photos of groups of civilian men massacred by Isis across Iraq and Syria – widely shared on social media and used by publications across the world – caused no outcry whatsoever.

 

It’s hard to look at that and not see a double standard: like many other courageous and talented people, Foley had chosen to travel to the region, and knew the risks that entailed. Others were killed simply fleeing their homes. In a strange and bitter irony, one of the duties of photographers such as Foley is documenting bloodshed in order to show the world.

 

To see an outcry for Foley’s video and not for others is to wonder whether we are disproportionately concerned over showing graphic deaths of white westerners – maybe even white journalists – and not others.


Twitter suspende cuentas que compartan fotos de periodista decapitado – BioBioChile

Twitter suspende cuentas que compartan fotos de periodista decapitado – BioBioChile.


Foto de archivo de James Foley | AFP PHOTO / ARIS MESSINIS

Foto de archivo de James Foley | AFP PHOTO / ARIS MESSINIS

Publicado por Eduardo Woo
Twitter se encuentra eliminando las fotos que circulan sobre la decapitación del periodistas estadounidense, James Foley, luego que fuera liberado un video con las grotescas imágenes en la que se ve la acción ejecutada por un yihadista presuntamente británico del Estado Islámico, grupo islamista ultrarradical que opera en Siria e Irak.

El presidente de Twitter, Dick Costolo, indicó a través de su cuenta que la compañía se encuentra suspendiendo las cuentas que estén viralizando ese contenido.


Barack Obama's Secret Terrorist-Tracking System, by the Numbers – The InterceptThe Intercept

Barack Obama’s Secret Terrorist-Tracking System, by the Numbers – The InterceptThe Intercept.

By and 660

Nearly half of the people on the U.S. government’s widely shared database of terrorist suspects are not connected to any known terrorist group, according to classified government documents obtained by The Intercept.

Of the 680,000 people caught up in the government’s Terrorist Screening Database—a watchlist of “known or suspected terrorists” that is shared with local law enforcement agencies, private contractors, and foreign governments—more than 40 percent are described by the government as having “no recognized terrorist group affiliation.” That category—280,000 people—dwarfs the number of watchlisted people suspected of ties to al Qaeda, Hamas, and Hezbollah combined.

The documents, obtained from a source in the intelligence community, also reveal that the Obama Administration has presided over an unprecedented expansion of the terrorist screening system. Since taking office, Obama has boosted the number of people on the no fly list more than ten-fold, to an all-time high of 47,000—surpassing the number of people barred from flying under George W. Bush.

“If everything is terrorism, then nothing is terrorism,” says David Gomez, a former senior FBI special agent. The watchlisting system, he adds, is “revving out of control.”

Shrug Chart - Josh Begley

The classified documents were prepared by the National Counterterrorism Center, the lead agency for tracking individuals with suspected links to international terrorism. Stamped “SECRET” and “NOFORN” (indicating they are not to be shared with foreign governments), they offer the most complete numerical picture of the watchlisting system to date. Among the revelations:

• The second-highest concentration of people designated as “known or suspected terrorists” by the government is in Dearborn, Mich.—a city of 96,000 that has the largest percentage of Arab-American residents in the country.

• The government adds names to its databases, or adds information on existing subjects, at a rate of 900 records each day.

• The CIA uses a previously unknown program, code-named Hydra, to secretly access databases maintained by foreign countries and extract  data to add to the watchlists.


Chomsky/ Edward Snowden, el criminal más buscado | SurySur

Chomsky/ Edward Snowden, el criminal más buscado | SurySur.

jun22014

Chomsky/ Edward Snowden, el criminal más buscado

eeuu snowden en nbc

En meses pasados hemos recibido lecciones instructivas sobre la naturaleza del poder del Estado y las fuerzas que impulsan su política. Y sobre un asunto íntimamente relacionado: el sutil y diferenciado concepto de la transparencia.

La fuente de la instrucción, por supuesto, es el conjunto de documentos relativos al sistema de vigilancia de la Agencia Nacional de Seguridad (NSA, por sus siglas en inglés) dados a conocer por el valeroso luchador por la libertad Edward J. Snowden, resumidos de manera experta y analizados por su colaborador Glenn Greenwald en su nuevo libro No place to hide (Sin lugar para esconderse).

Los documentos revelan un notable proyecto destinado a exponer al escrutinio estatal información vital acerca de toda persona que cae en las garras del coloso: en principio, de toda persona vinculada con la moderna sociedad electrónica.

Nada tan ambicioso fue jamás imaginado por los profetas distópicos que describieron sombríos mundos totalitarios. No es de poca importancia que el proyecto sea ejecutado en uno de los países más libres del planeta y en radical violación de la Carta de Derechos de la Constitución de Estados Unidos, que protege a los ciudadanos de “persecuciones y capturas sin motivo” y garantiza la privacidad de sus “personas, domicilios, documentos y pertenencias”.

Por mucho que lo intenten los legistas del gobierno, no hay forma de reconciliar estos principios con el asalto a la población que revelan los documentos de Snowden.


MANDO CONJUNTO DE CIBERDEFENSA MCCD DE LAS FUERZAS ARMADAS: LA REPRESIÓN EN LA RED

http://tarcoteca.blogspot.com/search?updated-min=2013-01-01T00:00:00%2B01:00&updated-max=2014-01-01T00:00:00%2B01:00&max-results=50

jueves, 18 de julio de 2013

Publicado por 
En septiembre se reabrirá la base militar de Retamares como núcleo central del Mando Conjunto de CiberDefensa de las Fuerzas Armadas (MCCD). Preparado para ser la estructura de espionaje más importante del país e integrado en la red de Ciberdefensa de la OTAN.
El asalto de la red a la calle ya está organizado.Publicado el 18.7.2013, última edición 21.7.2013

El Mando Conjunto de CiberDefensa de las Fuerzas Armadas (MCCD) se estrenará el próximo 27 de septiembre, así lo anunció ayer el comandante jefe del Mando Conjunto de Ciberdefensa, el general del Ejército del Aire Carlos Gómez López de Medina.

Contará con una plantilla de 70 personas, de las cuales 49 serán militares y 21 civiles. Actualmente, su personal se cifra en 19 personas, teniendo que elevarse la plantilla en los siguientes dos meses.

Entre los cometidos [oficiales] del Mando de Ciberdefensa se encuentran garantizar el libre acceso al ciberespacio con el fin de cumplir las misiones asignadas a las Fuerzas Armadas; ejercer la respuesta ante amenazas o agresiones que puedan afectar a la Defensa Nacional y obtener, analizar y explotar la información sobre ciberataques e incidentes en las redes y sistemas de su responsabilidad. infodefensa

El Mando de Ciberdefensa creado oficialmente por el Ministerio de Defensa en el mes de febrero será un órgano perteneciente al Estado Mayor de la Defensa, integrado en la estructura operativa de las Fuerzas Armadas. Tendrá su cuartel en Retamares (Pozuelo de alarcón, Madrid) bajo las órdenes del jefe del Estado Mayor de la Defensa (Jemad) el almirante Fernando García Sánchez.