EU could give police direct access to cloud data in wake of terror attacks | Technology | The Guardian

The European Union is seeking to make it easier for police and law enforcement agencies to retrieve electronic evidence from US tech firms, including directly from cloud storage.

Fuente: EU could give police direct access to cloud data in wake of terror attacks | Technology | The Guardian


Sweden Withdraws Arrest Warrant for Julian Assange, but He Still Faces Serious Legal Jeopardy

The termination of the Swedish investigation is, in one sense, good news for Assange. But it is unlikely to change his inability to leave the embassy any time soon. If anything, given the apparent determination of the Trump administration to put him in a U.S. prison cell for the “crime” of publishing documents, his freedom appears further away than it has since 2010, when the Swedish case began.

Fuente: Sweden Withdraws Arrest Warrant for Julian Assange, but He Still Faces Serious Legal Jeopardy


Julian Assange addresses media from Ecuadorian embassy in London – live | Media | The Guardian

“Today is an important victory for me,” Assange says, adding that his seven-year legal ordeal, which he calls unjust detention, “is not something that I can forgive.”It was “extremely regretful” that he was still being threatened with arrest if he leaves the embassy, he added,

Fuente: Julian Assange addresses media from Ecuadorian embassy in London – live | Media | The Guardian


Chelsea Manning released from military prison | US news | The Guardian

Chelsea Manning, the army private who released a vast trove of US state secrets and was punished by the US military for months in penal conditions denounced by the UN as torture, has been released from a military prison in Kansas after serving seven years of a 35-year sentence.

Fuente: Chelsea Manning released from military prison | US news | The Guardian


Open Data Projects Are Fueling the Fight Against Police Misconduct

situation is beginning to change — as a growing number of police accountability groups are starting to bypass the departments by aggregating and distributing misconduct history databases on their own.

Fuente: Open Data Projects Are Fueling the Fight Against Police Misconduct


Cierran su cuenta de Twitter por publicar videos de Rio 2016 – FayerWayer

Luigino Bracci Roa es un activista venezolano con cierta popularidad en Twitter. Pero quizás olvidó leer las reglas impuestas por el Comité Olímpico Internacional (COI), respecto a la publicación de contenido de Rio 2016, en donde se prohíbe compartir cualquier cosa relacionada, si no se es patrocinador; pues su cuenta ha sido suspendida.

Fuente: Cierran su cuenta de Twitter por publicar videos de Rio 2016 – FayerWayer


El caso de Diego Gómez y la irracionalidad del derecho de autor | Derechos Digitales

Ante la evidencia de lo dañino que es el actual sistema de derechos de autor, se vuelve imprescindible que los países de América Latina realicen un profundo proceso de reforma a sus legislaciones de propiedad intelectual y consagren un sistema balanceado, que tenga por objetivo incentivar el acceso a la cultura, la investigación científica y la democratización del conocimiento.

Fuente: El caso de Diego Gómez y la irracionalidad del derecho de autor | Derechos Digitales


Hundreds of Pokémon Go players fined for playing while driving in Taiwan | Technology | The Guardian

Most of the 349 fines were issued to people playing the game on motorcycles since the game was released on Saturday

Fuente: Hundreds of Pokémon Go players fined for playing while driving in Taiwan | Technology | The Guardian


LuxLeaks: ¿Revelación de secretos o servicio público?

La última sesión del juicio a los acusados de la filtración de los papeles del escándalo LuxLeaks augura penas de 18 meses de prisión y multasHacemos un repaso de la historia que llevó a dos trabajadores de una consultora encargada de auditar las cuentas de varias empresas a filtrar información

Fuente: LuxLeaks: ¿Revelación de secretos o servicio público?


LuxLeaks prosecutors seek jail term of 18 months for whistleblowers | Business | The Guardian

Prosecutors in Luxembourg have called for two whistleblowers on trial over the so-called LuxLeaks scandal to be jailed for 18 months and for a journalist to be fined.Antoine Deltour and Raphaël Halet, French former employees of auditing firm PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), are accused of leaking thousands of documents to journalist Edouard Perrin.The documents revealed the huge tax breaks that Luxembourg offered international firms including Apple, Ikea and Pepsi, saving the companies billions of euros in taxes.

Fuente: LuxLeaks prosecutors seek jail term of 18 months for whistleblowers | Business | The Guardian


Police reaction to revenge porn is playing into predators’ hands | Joan Smith | Opinion | The Guardian

A few years ago the idea of someone publishing explicit photographs of a former lover, out of spite or as a form of blackmail, was still in the realms of fiction. But advances in technology have created fresh opportunities for sexual predators, and the criminal justice system is finding it difficult to cope with new forms of aggressive and controlling behaviour.

Fuente: Police reaction to revenge porn is playing into predators’ hands | Joan Smith | Opinion | The Guardian


Panama Papers Source Wants Whistleblower Immunity to Aid Law Enforcement

“I have watched as one after another, whistleblowers and activists in the United States and Europe have had their lives destroyed by the circumstances they find themselves in after shining a light on obvious wrongdoing.”

Fuente: Panama Papers Source Wants Whistleblower Immunity to Aid Law Enforcement


Child porn suspect jailed indefinitely for refusing to decrypt hard drives | Ars Technica

A Philadelphia man suspected of possessing child pornography has been in jail for seven months and counting after being found in contempt of a court order demanding that he decrypt two password-protected hard drives.

Fuente: Child porn suspect jailed indefinitely for refusing to decrypt hard drives | Ars Technica


Sale de la cárcel un ejecutivo de Facebook detenido en Brasil | Internacional | EL PAÍS

El vicepresidente de Facebook para América Latina, Diego Dzodan, ha salido de prisión apenas un día después de ser detenido en São Paulo. Un tribunal ha revocado la orden de cárcel del ejecutivo, que entró en prisión el martes por orden de un juez de la ciudad de Lagarto (Estado de Sergipe, al noroeste del país). El magistrado acusó a Dzodan de negarse reiteradamente a revelar mensajes intercambiados en la aplicación de mensajería WhatsApp, propiedad de Facebook desde 2014. Según las autoridades, las conversaciones que requería la Policía Federal eran pruebas esenciales en una investigación sobre crimen organizado y tráfico de drogas.

Fuente: Sale de la cárcel un ejecutivo de Facebook detenido en Brasil | Internacional | EL PAÍS


Facebook executive arrested in Brazil over WhatsApp data clash – FT.com

Brazilian police have arrested Facebook’s vice-president for Latin America after claims the social network refused to co-operate with an investigation into drug trafficking, marking a fresh tussle between US technology groups and law enforcement

Fuente: Facebook executive arrested in Brazil over WhatsApp data clash – FT.com


Assange supporters condemn UK and Sweden in open letter | Media | The Guardian

Five hundred prominent names, including Ai Weiwei and Mairead Maguire, accuse countries of undermining UN human rights covenants

Fuente: Assange supporters condemn UK and Sweden in open letter | Media | The Guardian


Julian Assange: UN report is ‘victory that cannot be denied' – video | Media | The Guardian

Wikileaks founder Julian Assange speaks on Friday from the balcony of the Ecuador embassy in London, where he has been holed up for over three years

Fuente: Julian Assange: UN report is ‘victory that cannot be denied’ – video | Media | The Guardian


Julian Assange accuses UK minister of insulting UN after detention finding | Media | The Guardian

Foreign secretary Philip Hammond dismisses panel’s finding as ‘ridiculous’ but WikiLeaks founder hails ‘sweet victory’

Fuente: Julian Assange accuses UK minister of insulting UN after detention finding | Media | The Guardian


Kim Dotcom's extradition to US cleared by New Zealand judge | Technology | The Guardian

Megaupload founder is wanted by American authorities on charges of copyright infringement, racketeering and money laundering

Fuente: Kim Dotcom’s extradition to US cleared by New Zealand judge | Technology | The Guardian


Revenge porn website operator jailed | US news | The Guardian

Revenge porn website operator jailed | US news | The Guardian.

Kevin Bollaert in court Kevin Bollaert at his sentencing hearing in San Diego. Photograph: Nelvin C Cepeda/AP

A San Diego man who operated a “revenge porn” website and then charged victims to remove nude images and personal information was sentenced on Friday to 18 years in state prison, the attorney general’s office has said. Kevin Bollaert, 28, was convicted in February of 21 counts of identity theft and six counts of extortion in San Diego superior court for running a pair of websites that capitalised on the internet as a forum for public shaming.

Jilted lovers and hackers could anonymously post nude photos of people without their consent, along with personal information, at a website Bollaert created called ugotposted.com. More than 10,000 images, mainly of women, were posted between December 2012 and September 2013. People who sought to have the explicit images taken down were directed to changemyreputation.com and charged $250 to $350 to remove the content.


Julian Assange to be questioned by Swedish prosecutors in London | Media | The Guardian

Julian Assange to be questioned by Swedish prosecutors in London | Media | The Guardian.

Julian Assange has been in Ecuador’s embassy in London for nearly three years to avoid extradition from Sweden.Julian Assange has taken refuge in Ecuador’s embassy in London to avoid extradition from Sweden. Photograph: WPA Pool/Getty Images

Lawyers for Julian Assange have claimed victory after a Swedish prosecutor bowed to pressure from the courts and agreed to break the deadlock in his case by interviewing the WikiLeaks founder in London.

Marianne Ny, who heads the investigation into accusations of rape, coercion and sexual molestation against Assange, made a formal request to interrogate him in the Ecuadorian embassy – the first sign of movement in a case that has been frozen since August 2012.

The prosecutor will also ask the UK government and Ecuador for permission to carry out the interviews at the embassy in London, where Assange has been staying for more than two-and-a-half years to avoid extradition to Sweden, from where he fears being handed over to the US to face espionage charges.

Ny said she had changed her mind because the statute of limitations on several of the crimes of which Assange is suspected runs out in August 2015.

“My attitude has been that the forms for a hearing with him at the embassy in London are such that the quality of the interrogation would be inadequate and that he needs to be present in Sweden at a trial. That assessment remains,” Ny said in a statement.

“Now time is running out and I therefore believe that I have to accept a loss of quality in the investigation and take the risk that the hearing will not take the investigation forward, because no other option is available as long as Assange does not make himself available in Sweden,” she said.

Per Samuelson, a Stockholm lawyer for Assange, said: “It is a victory for us. We have been asking for this to happen for over four years. That is the route to acquittal.”


La fiscal sueca cambia de opinión y pide interrogar a Assange en Londres | Internacional | EL PAÍS

La fiscal sueca cambia de opinión y pide interrogar a Assange en Londres | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

 

Assange, en una comparecencia desde la embajada de Ecuador, en 2012. / LEON NEAL (AFP)

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La Fiscalía de Suecia ha planteado al fundador de Wikileaks, Julian Assange, la posibilidad de interrogarle en Londres por los delitos sexuales que se le imputan en el país nórdico, por los que también se ha solicitado una prueba de ADN. Con ello, la justicia sueca espera poder esclarecer las cuatro denuncias que pesan en su contra y por las que dictó una orden de presión preventiva en ausencia de Assange en 2010.

El motivo del cambio de decisión de la fiscal superior de Suecia, Marianne Ny, que hasta ahora se había negado a viajar a Londres apelando a la legislación sueca, es que varios de los delitos de los que Assange es sospechoso prescriben en agosto de 2015, explicó la Fiscalía en un comunicado.

Assange permanece encerrado en la Embajada de Ecuador en la capital británica desde junio de 2012. En este tiempo, el fundador de Wikileaks ha evitado su extradición a Suecia aprovechando el limbo legal en el que se quedó tras saltarse los requisitos de libertad vigilada en Reino Unido.

Assange ha negado cualquier responsabilidad en estos delitos, pero se niega a dar explicaciones en Suecia porque no existen garantías de que no vaya a ser extraditado con posterioridad a Estados Unidos, donde sería juzgado por la filtración masiva de documentos oficiales a Wikileaks.


Edward Snowden's lawyers 'working' to bring NSA whistleblower back to US | US news | The Guardian

Edward Snowden’s lawyers ‘working’ to bring NSA whistleblower back to US | US news | The Guardian.

Edward Snowden in Citizenfour. Edward Snowden in the Oscar-winning documentary Citizenfour. Photograph: PR

 

 

A Russian lawyer for Edward Snowden, the NSA whistleblower, said on Tuesday that new legal efforts were under way to arrange a return for Snowden to the United States, although such efforts could not be independently confirmed.

 

“I won’t keep it secret that he … wants to return back home,” lawyer Anatoly Kucherena told Reuters. “And we are doing everything possible now to solve this issue. There is a group of US lawyers, there is also a group of German lawyers and I’m dealing with it on the Russian side.”

A US legal adviser to Snowden, Ben Wizner, a lawyer with the American Civil Liberties Union, declined on Wednesday to comment on Kucherena’s statement.


Obama's Cyber Proposals Sound Good, But Erode Information Security – The Intercept

Obama’s Cyber Proposals Sound Good, But Erode Information Security – The Intercept.

BY DAN FROOMKIN 

The State of the Union address President Obama delivers tonight will include a slate of cyber proposals crafted to sound like timely government protections in an era beset by villainous hackers.

They would in theory help the government and private sector share hack data more effectively; increase penalties for the most troubling forms of hacking; and require better notification of people when their personal data has been stolen.

But if you cut through the spin, it turns out that the steps Obama is proposing would likely erode, rather than strengthen, information security for citizens and computer experts trying to protect them. Consider:

  • There’s plenty of sharing of data on cyber threats already and no reason to think that the Sony Pictures hack or any of the other major recent cyber attacks could have been averted with more. What Obama is proposing would, by contrast, give companies that have terrible security practices a pass in the form of liability protection from regulatory or civil action based on the information they disclose, while potentially allowing widespread distribution of personal data that should be private.
  • The increased penalties for hacking Obama is proposing could punish people who have only briefly rubbed shoulders with hackers as full-fledged members of a criminal enterprise, and criminalize “white-hat” hacking.
  • And Obama’s federal standards for when companies have to report that customers’ data has been stolen would actually overturn tougher standards in many states.

“There’s nothing that he would propose that would do anything to actually improve cybersecurity,” says Chris Soghoian, the principal technologist at the American Civil Liberties Union. “That’s a problem.”


Barrett Brown’s sentence is unjust, but it may become the norm for journalists – Boing Boing

Barrett Brown’s sentence is unjust, but it may become the norm for journalists – Boing Boing.

A journalist was jailed after sharing a hyperlink to a stolen document that he did not steal, and despite the fact that he was not guilty of a crime for linking to it.

By Trevor Timm

Investigative journalist Barrett Brown was sentenced to an obscene 63 months in prison on Thursday, in part for sharing a hyperlink to a stolen document that he did not steal, and despite the fact that he was not guilty of a crime for linking to it.

 

Maybe journalists think this is an anomaly, and some will ignore his case entirely since Brown also pled guilty to other charges that led to part of his sentence too. But be warned: if the White House passes its dramatic expansion of US computer law, journalists will constantly be under similar threat and reporting on hacked documents could become a crime.

How is this possible, you ask? Well, first it’s important to understand the details of Brown’s case.


Journalist Barrett Brown sentenced to 63 months in federal prison – Boing Boing

Journalist Barrett Brown sentenced to 63 months in federal prison – Boing Boing.

He’s already served more than two years in prison on charges related to sources within the Anonymous hacktivist entity.

By Xeni Jardin

A court in Dallas has sentenced Barrett Brown to 63 months in federal prison, minus 28 months already served. For count one in the case, he receives 48 months. For count 2, he receives 12 months. And for count 3, he receives 3 months. He is also ordered to pay $890,000 in restitution.

The government’s charges against the intelligence and security reporter stemmed from his relationship with sources close to the hacker group Anonymous, and the fact that Brown published a link to publicly-available copies of leaked Stratfor documents.

Brown read a statement to the court during the sentencing hearing, and you can read that statement in entirety here.

“Journalists are especially vulnerable right now, Your Honor, and they become more so when the FBI feels comfortable making false claims about them,” Brown wrote:

 

Deny being a spokesperson for Anonymous hundreds of times, and you’re still a spokesperson for Anonymous. Deny being a journalist once or twice, and you’re not a journalist. What conclusion can one draw from this sort of reasoning other than that you are whatever the FBI finds it convenient for you to be at any given moment. This is not the “rule of law”, Your Honor, it is the “rule of law enforcement”, and it is very dangerous.


Silk Road: El Internet profundo se sienta en el banquillo | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Silk Road: El Internet profundo se sienta en el banquillo | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

Comienza en Nueva York el juicio contra el presunto creador de una web anónima dedicada al tráfico de drogas que utilizaba los bitcoins como cibermoneda

Varias personas protestan el martes en la entrada de la Corte Federal de Manhattan en favor de Ross Ulbricht. / SPENCER PLATT (AFP)

La corte federal del distrito sur de Manhattan inició este martes un juicio por narcotráfico, conspiración para el asesinato y blanqueo de dinero. ¿Uno más? No. El jurado que aplicará o no la cadena perpetua para Ross Ulbricht, de 30 años, acusado de ser el creador de una página de Internet “oculta” dedicada a la venta de drogas y otros delitos bautizada como Silk Road (Ruta de la Seda), tiene entre manos un asunto peliagudo y complejo. No solo porque va a tener que lidiar con términos informáticos como bitcoin o Tor, muy alejados de las sordideces habituales de un asunto penal, sino porque el caso se mueve en arenas movedizas.

Sobre la mesa está la capacidad de las autoridades para luchar contra el uso de la moneda virtual bitcoin, utilizada por los usuarios de Silk Road, en el tráfico de drogas y otros crímenes. Otra cuestión no menor es cómo puede y debe afrontar la justicia de cualquier país los rincones oscuros de Internet, la denominada Deepnet (Internet profundo), y hasta dónde puede llegar un Gobierno en su labor vigilante de la red.


Silk Road trial begins as protesters rally round alleged mastermind Ross Ulbricht | Technology | The Guardian

Silk Road trial begins as protesters rally round alleged mastermind Ross Ulbricht | Technology | The Guardian.

Silk Road trial
 Supporters of Ross Ulbricht, the alleged creator and operator of the Silk Road underground market, stand in front of a Manhattan federal courthouse on the first day of jury selection. Photograph: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Protesters gathered at a Manhattan court building on Tuesday in support of Ross Ulbricht, whose trial for being the accused mastermind behind what was once the internet’s biggest illegal drugs marketplace was beginning at a federal court inside.

Federal prosecutors accuse Ulbricht, who allegedly went by the alias “Dread Pirate Roberts”, of being the owner and manager of the deep-web marketplace Silk Road. He was arrested in a library in San Francisco in October 2013, and charged with drug trafficking, criminal enterprise, aiding and abetting distribution of drugs over the internet, computer hacking and money laundering.

According to the indictment, Ulbricht himself reaped “tens of millions of dollars” in commissions.

He is also charged with involvement in conspiracy to commission six “hits”, including against a former Silk Road employee, using bitcoin to pay the purported assassins. No killings were actually carried out.

In court, Ulbricht, clean-shaven and dressed smartly in a dark blazer and beige slacks, sat confidently beside his legal team. Occasionally he turned to flash a smile at his mother, Lyn, who was in the public gallery.

Ulbricht has consistently claimed that he was not Dread Pirate Roberts, and denies all the charges against him.

Outside the courtroom, protesters had gathered in support of Ulbricht.

Derrick J Freeman, who had come from Keene, New Hampshire, to demonstrate outside the court, told the Guardian he thought it would set a dangerous precedent if a website can be prosecuted for what its users do. “If so, drag Craigslist off to prison,” he said.

In its heyday, Silk Road was a sprawling marketplace where people used bitcoin to purchase a galaxy of different stimulants, hallucinogenics, opiates and prescription drugs.


Court rejects attempt to allow Edward Snowden into Germany | US news | The Guardian

Court rejects attempt to allow Edward Snowden into Germany | US news | The Guardian.

Opposition parties wanted Snowden to give evidence in person to a parliamentary committee investigating NSA espionage

 

 

Edward Snowden
Edward Snowden. Photograph: Guardian

 

Attempts by opposition parties in Germany to bring Edward Snowden to Berlin to give evidence about the NSA’s operations have been thwarted by the country’s highest court.

 

The Green and Left parties wanted the whistleblower to give evidence in person to a parliamentary committee investigating espionage by the US agency, but Germany’s constitutional court ruled against them on Friday.

 

The government has argued that Snowden’s presence in Germany could impair relations with the US and put it under pressure to extradite him.

 

It has suggested sending the committee – which consists of eight MPs – to interview him in Moscow, where Snowden is living in exile. Snowden has said through a lawyer that he is prepared to speak to the panel only if permitted to do so in Germany.


Confundador de Pirate Bay es hallado culpable de piratería informática en Dinamarca – BioBioChile

Confundador de Pirate Bay es hallado culpable de piratería informática en Dinamarca – BioBioChile.

 

Jon Åslund (cc)Jon Åslund (cc)

Publicado por Javier Cisterna | La Información es de Agencia AFP
 

Uno de los cofundadores del sitio web Pirate Bay, el sueco Gottfrid Svartholm Warg, fue hallado culpable en el caso más importante de piratería informática en Dinamarca, anunció el jueves la justicia danesa.

“El ciudadano sueco de 30 años fue hallado culpable de piratería y de acto malintencionado”, declaró un tribunal de Copenhague. Un danés de 21 años también ha sido hallado culpable por complicidad en un intento de pirateo.

Los dos hombres descargaron ilegalmente ficheros de la policía y de la seguridad social en 2012. Por estos hechos, el fiscal pidió seis años de prisión contra Svartholm Warg, de 30 años, y dos años contra el otro acusado. La pena, no obstante, se conocerá el viernes.

El acusado sueco negó las acusaciones, al afirmar que alguien tomó el control de su ordenador a distancia para acceder a los ficheros.


Aprueban ley que obliga a almacenar datos de internet

Aprueban ley que obliga a almacenar datos de internet.

Aprueban  ley que obliga a almacenar datos de internet

Objetivo. La ley pretende poder ubicar desde qué computadora se cometen los delitos.

 

 

La Cámara de Senadores aprobó ayer un proyecto de ley que obliga a las operadoras de internet a almacenar datos de tráfico (IP) por el periodo de un año, a fin de ubicar el origen de las publicaciones.

 

 

El proyecto, que fue presentado en la sesión ordinaria por el senador Arnaldo Giuzzio, se aprobó con modificaciones tras la objeción por parte de algunos parlamentarios del punto en que indicaba quién podía requerir esta información, debido que se temía que pueda ser utilizado de manera irresponsable.

El texto original indicaba en su artículo primero que estos datos podían ser requeridos por “la autoridad competente, juez y fiscal, cuando lo requieran” y en el artículo séptimo establecía que la entrega de los datos debía realizarse “al Ministerio Público o Juzgado competente”.

Tras la objeción por parte de algunos legisladores, entre ellos la senadora de Desirée Masi, finalmente se estableció que se especifica que se podrá realizar el pedido solo a través de un juez.

Fines. Giuzzio indicó que de todos los casos investigados por pornografía infantil, el 80 por ciento no avanzan porque la falta de almacenamiento de IP por parte de las proveedoras de internet no permiten identificar a los autores del ilícito.

Comentó que con esta ley se podrá saber el origen de los mensajes en casos investigados por estafa mediante internet, e incluso en el combate al autodenominado Ejército del Pueblo Paraguayo (EPP).

Como ejemplo recordó el video del autodenominado EPP que se declaraba la autoría de la quema de una comisaría, donde la Fiscalía solicitó a la matriz de Facebook el origen del video, en Estados Unidos. El dato decía ‘Paraguay’, pero el IP no pudo ser identificado porque las operadoras no retenían la información, señaló.


#CompartirNoEsDelito”: Investigador arriesga hasta 8 años de cárcel por compartir una tesis de maestría | Manzana Mecánica

#CompartirNoEsDelito”: Investigador arriesga hasta 8 años de cárcel por compartir una tesis de maestría | Manzana Mecánica.

¿Te consideras delincuente por compartir un artículo académico, una tesis o cualquier tipo de conocimiento dentro de tu área de investigación, sin fines de lucro y citando adecuadamente a su autor? Pues la ley sí cree que eres delincuente, al menos en Colombia.

Este es el caso de Diego Gómez, biólogo de la Universidad de Quindío (Colombia) y que actualmente cursa una maestría en Costa Rica.


Bitcoin entrepreneur Charlie Shrem will plead guilty on US charges | Technology | theguardian.com

Bitcoin entrepreneur Charlie Shrem will plead guilty on US charges | Technology | theguardian.com.

Former vice chairman of the Bitcoin Foundation reaches plea deal over alleged unlicensed money transmission

Charlie Shrem
Charlie Shrem at a court appearance in January. Photograph: Louis Lanzano/AP

Bitcoin entrepreneur Charlie Shrem has reached a plea deal to resolve US charges that he engaged in a scheme to sell over $1m of the digital currency to users of the illicit online marketplace Silk Road, his lawyer said on Friday.

Shrem, the former vice chairman of the Bitcoin Foundation, will plead guilty next Thursday in New York federal court to unlicensed money transmission, Marc Agnifilo, his lawyer, told Reuters in an email.

Prosecutors had previously charged Shrem with operating an unlicensed money transmitting business, money laundering conspiracy and failing to file suspicious activity reports with government banking authorities.

Federal authorities shut down Silk Road last year, though a new internet marketplace under the same name was launched in November. Prosecutors contend Silk Road enabled users to buy and sell illegal drugs and other illicit goods and services.

Soon after his arrest in January, Shrem stepped down from his role at the Bitcoin Foundation. He was previously the chief executive of BitInstant, a bitcoin exchange company.


Violencia de género: ¿Es necesaria una ley contra la porno venganza? – ONG Derechos Digitales

Violencia de género: ¿Es necesaria una ley contra la porno venganza? – ONG Derechos Digitales.

Las diputadas UDI Andrea Molina y Claudia Nogueira anunciaron la presentación de un proyecto de ley que sanciona la publicación en Internet de imágenes de connotación sexual sin el consentimiento del involucrado, medida que plantea la pregunta sobre el modo en que los males sociales son replicados en la red y de qué manera es posible combatirlos.

lalalalaLa violencia de género se ha servido de la tecnología, adoptando modalidades que hacen muy difícil combatirla. Es el caso de la porno venganza

Pocas veces advertimos cómo los males del mundo “offline” se replican también en Internet. Clasismo, racismo, abusos empresariales y otros trastornos sociales ocurren también en la red y tienden a ser aún más impunes que fuera de ésta, adoptando modalidades donde la tecnología facilita las instancias de odio.


¿Contra la libertad de expresión? | ELESPECTADOR.COM

¿Contra la libertad de expresión? | ELESPECTADOR.COM.

El alto tribunal confirmó la sentencia a 18 meses de prisión contra Gonzalo Hernán López por un comentario en la página en internet del diario ‘El País’ de Cali.

Por: Juan Sebastián Jiménez Herrera
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¿Contra la libertad de expresión?López fue condenado por un comentario a una noticia de elpais.com.co en la que se menciona a la presidente de Fededepartamentos, Gloria Escalante. / Ilustración

En un fallo sin precedentes, la Corte Suprema de Justicia acaba de confirmar la condena a 18 meses y 20 días de prisión contra un internauta, Gonzalo Hernán López, por un comentario que dejó en el foro de los lectores de una noticia publicada por elpais.com.co en la que se mencionaba a la hoy directora de la Federación de Departamentos, Gloria Escalante.

“Y con semejante rata como Escalante que hasta del Club Colombia y Comfenalco la han echado por malos manejos que (sic) se puede esperar… ¿El ladrón descubriendo ladrones? ¡Bah!”, fue el comentario hecho por López a la nota titulada “Siguen capturas por ‘cartel de becas’ en Emcali”, publicada por El País de Cali el 26 de noviembre de 2008.

El director de la Fundación para la Libertad de Prensa (Flip), Pedro Vaca, mostró serios reparos al fallo. “Este es un caso desproporcionado. Y la Corte Suprema, en vez de corregir eso y adaptarlo a estándares de libertad de expresión, lo que hace es dejarlo pasar y no abordar el debate de fondo. Es desproporcionado y el impacto que puede tener en el resto de foros de los lectores es muy delicado porque los foros en las páginas web de los periódicos suelen tener este tipo de comentarios. No es que este comentario sea la excepción”.

Por su parte, el analista Omar Rincón indicó que si la justicia va a considerar injuria lo dicho por López pues “(Álvaro) Uribe debería estar en la cárcel por todos los señalamientos que ha hecho y la cantidad de cosas que ha dicho que no son ciertas. Esto muestra una tendencia: que los jueces, la izquierda y la derecha, todos a los que les gusta ser los dueños de la verdad, tienen problemas con internet”.

Y agregó: “Si lo hacen ellos, está bien; si lo hace cualquier ciudadano, es gravísimo. Hay un clasismo alrededor de la opinión. Como si hubiera unos legitimados para opinar. En cambio a un pobre ciudadano que quiso desahogarse lo condenan. Esa es la lucha de internet: que todo ciudadano puede entrar en un diálogo robusto, moral. Ahí hay una discriminación. Si en la prensa tú puedes decir lo que quieras, ¿por qué internet tiene que ser penalizada?”.


Insólita explicación de Sabag (DC) por retiro de “Ley Anti-Memes” – El Mostrador

Insólita explicación de Sabag (DC) por retiro de “Ley Anti-Memes” – El Mostrador.

“No me fijé bien de lo que habían redactado mis asesores”, sostuvo el diputado oficialista.

Jorge Sabag

El diputado DC Jorge Sabag tuvo una particular explicación de por qué decidió bajar la ley “Anti-Memes”, de su propia autoría.

En entrevista con Radio Sonar, el parlamentario sostuvo que fue un “error” presentar hace ocho días la iniciativa, ya que “no tiene sentido seguir tramitándolo”.

“No me fijé bien de lo que habían redactado mis asesores”, agregó el legislador oficialista.

El proyecto que aún aparece en el sitio web de la Cámara, fue presentado por el diputado bajo el título: “Proyecto de Ley para modificar el código Penal para perfeccionar la protección de la dignidad de las autoridades”.

La iniciativa plantea una “pena de reclusión menor en su grado medio y multa de 11 a 15 unidades tributarias mensuales (entre 463.958 y 632.670 pesos) a quienes amenacen o insulten a las autoridades. El propósito de modernizar estas normas exige la inclusión de las redes sociales y los medios digitales, en la medida que se empleen como medios para hacer amenazas o para verter insultos y agresiones”.

La modificación apunta a “quienes realicen amenazas o profieran insultos contra la autoridad por medio de plataformas electrónicas, ya sea de forma textual o gráfica, considerándose como agravante que no lo hagan con su verdadera identidad o que intenten obstaculizar la identificación del computador desde el cual se difunde el mensaje”.

Los autores del proyecto son: Jorge Sabag (DC), Marcelo Chávez (DC), José Manuel Edwards (RN), Daniel Farcas (PPD), Iván Norambuena (UDI), Sergio Ojeda (DC) y José Pérez (PRSD).


59 International Organizations Call Upon UN to Remedy Human Rights Violations in Pre-Charge Detention of Wikileaks Publisher Julian Assange



59 International Organizations Call Upon UN to Remedy Human Rights Violations in Pre-Charge Detention of Wikileaks Publisher Julian Assange

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For Immediate Release: 16 June 2014

 

59 International Organizations Call Upon UN to Remedy Human Rights Violations in Pre-Charge Detention of Wikileaks Publisher Julian Assange

Geneva, Switzerland – Before the United Nations this Sunday, 26 international human rights, fair trial, and jurist organizations, and 33 Latin American civil society organisations, condemned Sweden’s violation of the fundamental human rights of WikiLeaks editor-in-chief Julian Assange, who has experienced protracted pre-charge detention stemming from a Swedish investigation which has yet to charge him. Mr. Assange’s pre-charge detention has spanned nearly four years as US Federal Grand Jury prepares a criminal case against WikiLeaks and it’s officers.

 

Two Swedish organizations, as well as jurist organizations from around the world including the American Association of Jurists (AAJ), the National Lawyer’s Guild (NLG), the International Association of Democratic Lawyers (IADL), and the Indian Association of Lawyers submitted two reports —one in English and one in Spanish— each highlighting various procedural rights violations  of Julian Assange, Sweden’s longest running case of pre-trial deprivation of liberty.

 

A third report, signed by 33 human rights groups, media and civil society organisations, and unions, including the Global Women’s March (Marcha Mundial das Mulheres, MMM), petitioned the Human Rights Commission in Geneva to intervene to free the ’political prisoner’, Julian Assange.

 

The reports were submitted to the UN’s Universal Periodic Review (UPR), the peak UN human rights review mechanism that investigates each country’s human rights record every four years. The submissions expose numerous systematic deficiencies in Swedish pre-trial procedures like the routine placement of persons who have not been charged with any crime in indefinite, isolated, or unexplained pre-charge detention.

 

According to the English report, signed by 16 organizations, “The methods employed by the prosecutor in Mr. Assange’s case are a clear violation of his fundamental human rights, yet they remain beyond the reach of judicial review.”

 

The second submission, signed by 10 international human rights, fair trial, and jurist organizations, says that “the Swedish Authorities’ demand that Mr. Assange be physically present in Sweden for questioning… would imply that Mr. Assange would have to renounce his inalienable right [to the protection afforded by his asylum in relation to the United States], but also means in practice that Mr. Assange would have to risk his life and physical integrity”.

 

The third submission, signed by 33 human rights groups, media and civil society organisations, and unions, from Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, and Ecuador, petitioned the UN Human Rights Commission to intervene with Sweden in order to secure the immediate release of Julian Assange:

 

“The entire international community has witnessed the opportunistic manipulation of the accusations against Mr. Assange, in an attempt to destroy his reputation and to prevent his freedom and his ability to act politically. It is obvious that this unprecedented situation has not come about as a result of the alleged acts committed in Sweden, but rather due to the clear political interference by powerful interests in response to Mr. Assange’s journalistic and political activities. This situation has turned Julian Assange into a political prisoner, who is effectively condemned to house arrest without any charges having been brought against him, without being able to exercise his right to due process.”


Charlotte Laws' fight with Hunter Moore, the internet's revenge porn king | Culture | The Observer

Charlotte Laws’ fight with Hunter Moore, the internet’s revenge porn king | Culture | The Observer.

When Hunter Moore posted topless pictures of Charlotte Laws’ daughter online, she decided to take him down
Charlotte Laws at homeView larger picture

‘He messed with the wrong mum’: Charlotte Laws photographed at home in Woodland Hills, California. Photograph: Barry J Holmes for the Observer

I don’t realise quite how brave Charlotte Laws is until I see her in action at the United States Court House in Los Angeles. I’d met her at her home two days previously, but for most of the interview she’d been sitting down, and it’s only amid the imposing gloom of the 1940s building that I realise how tiny she is – less than 5ft tall, despite a pair of platform heels – and what exactly it is that she has taken on. We’re waiting for a bail hearing in the case of the United States versus Charlie Evens, and Laws is clutching a stash of printouts from the internet which she shows the prosecutor before the judge arrives.

“What are these?” the prosecutor asks.

“They’re my latest death threats,” says Laws.

“What?” says the prosecutor. “Have you passed these on to the FBI?”

“I told the FBI press office,” she says.

“No, you need to get these to an investigator. You need to contact the agent immediately.” She leafs through the pages and then looks at Laws. “Are you concerned?”

Laws shrugs. “A bit.”

I read them over her shoulder. They mostly came from anonymous Twitter accounts. Somebody called “DepressedSaintsFan” names her and then says: “We need to get a hit out on this bitch.” Another calls her daughter “a cock-hungry slut”. But it’s just the tip of a larger, altogether nastier iceberg: phone calls, a strange car that turned up in her street, and dozens of abusive, barely literate threats and insults and libels against Laws, her daughter, her husband. This is the price you pay, it turns out, for taking on a 27-year-old website owner called Hunter Moore, or, as he came to be known, the “Most Hated Man on the Internet”.

This is, given the internet, and what is on it, quite a title; it was bestowed by a BBC reporter back in 2012 and subsequently adopted by Moore as both a badge of honour and a handy marketing tool. If you traffic in human misery, it’s the kind of endorsement that will bring in a few thousand more Twitter followers, more hits, more advertising revenue. Because Moore’s website, isanyoneup.com, operated in the murky world of “revenge porn” – a modern-age phenomenon that almost makes you long for crinoline skirts and steam-powered engines.

Moore’s schtick was publishing compromising photos and videos of women (and some men) together with their full names and as many identifying details as he and his followers could find: their geographic location, their occupation, their address. It was, like Facebook, he claimed, perfectly legal “user-generated content”. It was usually their exes who sent him the photos, though others were mysteriously “found”. Ex-boyfriends, ex-husbands, some ex-girlfriends out to humiliate their one-time partners. To compromise their jobs. To professionally embarrass them and personally hurt them. To reveal their most personal, intimate details to the world. And in some cases – the women who were judged not fit mothers because of pornographic content on the internet, or who were sacked from their jobs – to ruin their lives.

Moore called himself “a professional life ruiner”. He compared himself to Charles Manson. And Charlotte Laws didn’t just take him on. She mounted a two-year investigation into his activities, compiled a dossier of evidence from more than 40 victims all over the world, and then led the FBI to his front door. In January he was indicted for conspiracy, unauthorised access to a protected computer and aggravated identity theft. He faces up to 42 years in prison. “Unless he gets off,” says Laws. But she doesn’t really want to talk about that possibility. There are potential repercussions either way. Hunter Moore has “followers”, people who identify themselves, after Charles Manson, as The Family. It’s unclear what they are or aren’t capable of.


BBC News – UAE court convicts eight over 'spoof documentary video'

BBC News – UAE court convicts eight over ‘spoof documentary video’.

UAE court convicts eight over ‘spoof documentary video’

Shezanne Cassim Shezanne Cassim’s family said the video merely poked fun at teenagers

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Six foreigners and two UAE citizens have been sentenced to up to a year in jail for making what they say is a spoof video about Dubai youth culture.

A state security court found them guilty of “defaming the UAE society’s image abroad”, according to the state-owned newspaper, The National.

The family of American Shezanne Cassim, confirmed he was one of the six jailed for a year, three of them in absentia.

The foreigners were the first to be charged under a 2012 cybercrimes law.

It provides a legal basis to prosecute people who use information technology to criticise senior officials, argue for political reform or organise unlicensed demonstrations.


Court Orders Google, Microsoft & Yahoo to Make Pirate Sites Disappear | TorrentFreak

Court Orders Google, Microsoft & Yahoo to Make Pirate Sites Disappear | TorrentFreak.

While its common for search engines to receive DMCA takedown requests for specific URLs, events in France have taken things to a whole new level. In order to protect the copyrights of film producers, the High Court of Paris has concluded a 2011 case by ordering Google, Microsoft and Yahoo to completely de-list 16 video streaming sites from their search results.

google-bayLast week turned out to be yet another hectic seven days for the copyright enforcement obligations of Google. The search engine received requests to de-list 6.51 million allegedly infringing URLs, yet another new record in a piracy battle that seemingly has no end.

If the entertainment companies had their way, however, things would be handled differently. The general line coming out of the MPAA, RIAA and their UK-based counterparts BPI, is that by now Google knows which domains are infringing copyright. On this basis action should be taken to render their indexes harder to find. Or better still, have them de-listed from search engines altogether, the rightsholders say.

While Google has shown zero interest in the latter proposal, over in Europe a case underway since 2011 has now concluded, with a thought-provoking outcome for the entertainment industries.

The case dates back to December 2011 when L’Association des Producteurs de Cinéma (APC), a group which in itself represents more than 120 companies including Paramount and Sony, teamed up with La Fédération Nationale des Distributeurs de Films (FNDF) and Syndicat de l’Edition Vidéo Numérique (SEVN). Adding to the already formidable lineup, the groups were later joined by the Union of Film Producers (UPF) and the Union of Independent Producers (SPI).