Sweden Withdraws Arrest Warrant for Julian Assange, but He Still Faces Serious Legal Jeopardy

The termination of the Swedish investigation is, in one sense, good news for Assange. But it is unlikely to change his inability to leave the embassy any time soon. If anything, given the apparent determination of the Trump administration to put him in a U.S. prison cell for the “crime” of publishing documents, his freedom appears further away than it has since 2010, when the Swedish case began.

Fuente: Sweden Withdraws Arrest Warrant for Julian Assange, but He Still Faces Serious Legal Jeopardy


Julian Assange addresses media from Ecuadorian embassy in London – live | Media | The Guardian

“Today is an important victory for me,” Assange says, adding that his seven-year legal ordeal, which he calls unjust detention, “is not something that I can forgive.”It was “extremely regretful” that he was still being threatened with arrest if he leaves the embassy, he added,

Fuente: Julian Assange addresses media from Ecuadorian embassy in London – live | Media | The Guardian


Campaign group to challenge UK over surrender of passwords at border control | Politics | The Guardian

The move comes after its international director, Muhammad Rabbani, a UK citizen, was arrested at Heathrow airport in November for refusing to hand over passwords. Rabbani, 35, has been detained at least 20 times over the past decade when entering the UK, under schedule 7 of terrorism legislation that provides broad search powers, but this was the first time he had been arrested.

Fuente: Campaign group to challenge UK over surrender of passwords at border control | Politics | The Guardian


Police reaction to revenge porn is playing into predators’ hands | Joan Smith | Opinion | The Guardian

A few years ago the idea of someone publishing explicit photographs of a former lover, out of spite or as a form of blackmail, was still in the realms of fiction. But advances in technology have created fresh opportunities for sexual predators, and the criminal justice system is finding it difficult to cope with new forms of aggressive and controlling behaviour.

Fuente: Police reaction to revenge porn is playing into predators’ hands | Joan Smith | Opinion | The Guardian


Assange supporters condemn UK and Sweden in open letter | Media | The Guardian

Five hundred prominent names, including Ai Weiwei and Mairead Maguire, accuse countries of undermining UN human rights covenants

Fuente: Assange supporters condemn UK and Sweden in open letter | Media | The Guardian


Julian Assange: UN report is ‘victory that cannot be denied' – video | Media | The Guardian

Wikileaks founder Julian Assange speaks on Friday from the balcony of the Ecuador embassy in London, where he has been holed up for over three years

Fuente: Julian Assange: UN report is ‘victory that cannot be denied’ – video | Media | The Guardian


Julian Assange accuses UK minister of insulting UN after detention finding | Media | The Guardian

Foreign secretary Philip Hammond dismisses panel’s finding as ‘ridiculous’ but WikiLeaks founder hails ‘sweet victory’

Fuente: Julian Assange accuses UK minister of insulting UN after detention finding | Media | The Guardian


Edward Snowden's message to Guardian readers – video | Membership | The Guardian

Edward Snowden’s message to Guardian readers – video | Membership | The Guardian.

Guardian defence and intelligence correspondent Ewen MacAskill reads out a message to Guardian readers at a Members’ screening of Citizenfour in London. MacAskill joined editor-in-chief Alan Rusbriger, Janine Gibson and Stuart Millar to discuss the Snowden story in Kings Place on 2 March 2015.


Barack Obama and David Cameron fail to see eye to eye on surveillance | US news | The Guardian

Barack Obama and David Cameron fail to see eye to eye on surveillance | US news | The Guardian.


British prime minister takes tougher line on internet companies than US president at White House talks on Islamist threats

In Washington, David Cameron announces the creation of a joint group between the US and the UK to counter the rise of domestic violent extremism in the two countries

Barack Obama and David Cameron struck different notes on surveillance powers after the president conceded that there is an important balance to be struck between monitoring terror suspects and protecting civil liberties.

As Cameron warned the internet giants that they must do more to ensure they do not become platforms for terrorist communications, the US president said he welcomed the way in which civil liberties groups hold them to account by tapping them on the shoulder.

Obama agreed with the prime minister that there could be no spaces on the internet for terrorists to communicate that could not be monitored by the intelligences agencies, subject to proper oversight. But, unlike Cameron, the president encouraged groups to ensure that he and other leaders do not abandon civil liberties.

The prime minister adopted a harder stance on the need for big internet companies such as Facebook and Twitter to do more to cooperate with the surveillance of terror suspects. In an interview with Channel 4 News he said they had to be careful not to act as a communications platform for terrorists.


Maniobras de ciberguerra a orillas del Atlántico | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Maniobras de ciberguerra a orillas del Atlántico | Internacional | EL PAÍS.


EE UU y Reino Unido lanzan ejercicios y equipos mixtos de expertos para responder a la oleada de ataques informáticos

 /  /  Londres / Washington / Madrid 17 ENE 2015 – 02:33CET2

Cameron y Obama en Washington / E.V. (AP) / VÍDEO: REUTERS LIVE

A lo largo de 2015 los poderosos sectores financieros de Estados Unidos y Reino Unido, posiblemente el Banco de Inglaterra y Wall Street, serán objeto de un ciberataque. Será, en realidad, un ataque ficticio. Un simulacro. El primero de una serie de ejercicios conjuntos entre los servicios de espionaje, que se producirán en el marco de un acuerdo “sin precedentes” entre los dos aliados, para poner a prueba los mecanismos de seguridad en las “infraestructuras nacionales críticas” ante la amenaza de los cibercriminales.

Así lo confirmaron el viernes en Washington el primer ministro británico, el conservador David Cameron, y el presidente estadounidense, Barack Obama. “Dado el urgente y creciente peligro de los ciberataques, hemos decidido expandir nuestra cooperación en ciberseguridad para proteger nuestra infraestructura más crítica, nuestros negocios y la privacidad de nuestros pueblos”, dijo Obama.

A renglón seguido, el primer ministro británico coincidió en la necesidad de forjar una estructura conjunta que pueda proteger “mejor” a sus países ante los ciberataques, en referencia al asalto atribuido a Corea del Norte contra la compañía Sony a finales de año o el que esta semana afectó a la cuenta en Twitter del Mando Central de EE UU, lanzado presuntamente por simpatizantes del Estado Islámico (EI).

Cameron, que ya adelantó los planes conjuntos de ambos aliados antes de reunirse con Obama, ha intensificado, tras el ataque contra el semanario francés Charlie Hebdo, su campaña para lograr que los Gobiernos dispongan de más poderes para acceder a la actividad en Internet de los sospechosos de terrorismo, y busca aliados en su empeño.


With Power of Social Media Growing, Police Now Monitoring and Criminalizing Online Speech – The Intercept

With Power of Social Media Growing, Police Now Monitoring and Criminalizing Online Speech – The Intercept.

BY GLENN GREENWALD 

Featured photo - With Power of Social Media Growing, Police Now Monitoring and Criminalizing Online Speech

On March 6, 2012, six British soldiers were killed in Afghanistan by a roadside explosive device, and a national ritual of mourning and rage ensued. Prime Minister David Cameron called it a “desperately sad day for our country.” A British teenager, Azhar Ahmed, observed the reaction for two days and then went to Facebook to angrily object that the innocent Afghans killed by British soldiers receive almost no attention from British media. He opined that the UK’s soldiers in Afghanistan are guilty, their deaths deserved, and are therefore going to hell:

The following day, Ahmed was arrested and “charged with a racially aggravated public order offense.” The police spokesman explained that “he didn’t make his point very well and that is why he has landed himself in bother.” The state proceeded to prosecute him, and in October of that year, he was convicted “of sending a grossly offensive communication,” fined and sentenced to 240 hours of community service.

As demonstrators demanded he be imprisoned, the judge who sentenced Ahmed pronounced his opinions “beyond the pale of what’s tolerable in our society,” ruling: “I’m satisfied that the message was grossly offensive.” The Independent‘s Jerome Taylor noted that he “escaped jail partially because he quickly took down his unpleasant posting and tried to apologize to those he offended.” Apparently, heretics may be partially redeemed if theypublicly renounce their heresies.


Julian Assange asegura que abandonará “pronto” la embajada de Ecuador en Londres – BioBioChile

Julian Assange asegura que abandonará “pronto” la embajada de Ecuador en Londres – BioBioChile.

 

John Stillwell | AFP PhotoJohn Stillwell | AFP Photo

 

Publicado por Patricia Acuña | La Información es de Agencia AFP

 

 

El fundador de WikiLeaks, Julian Assange, dijo el lunes que abandonará la embajada de Ecuador en Londres, pero el tono de su respuesta y las aclaraciones de su portavoz dan a entender que su salida no es inminente ni tiene fecha.

“Kristinn [Hrafnsson, portavoz de Assange] ha dicho que puede confirmar que me iré de la embajada pronto”, declaró Assange riendo, en lo que se interpretó como una broma sobre el anuncio de varios medios, citando al portavoz, de que estaba a punto de salir por problemas de salud después de 26 meses de asilo.

La salida no se deberá a las razones “publicadas en la prensa”, agregó Assange, que compareció ante los medios junto al ministro ecuatoriano de Relaciones Exteriores, Ricardo Patiño.

El australiano no quiso volver sobre sus palabras pese a la insistencia de los periodistas, pero Hrafnsson indicó tras la conferencia de prensa: “Lo que Julian ha querido decir es que se irá en cuanto el gobierno británico honre sus compromisos” con las leyes internacionales.

La prensa británica escribió este fin de semana, citando una fuente de WikiLeaks, que el australiano Assange padece arritmia cardíaca y problemas de pulmón, además de una presión sanguínea demasiado alta.

Hranfsson también respondió a estas informaciones afirmando: “A mí me pareció que [Assange] estaba muy bien”.

Las especulaciones sobre su salida hicieron que decenas de fotógrafos y camarógrafos se agolparan ante la sede de la legación ecuatoriana, en el barrio de Knightsbridge, muy cerca de los famosos almacenes Harrods.

El funcionario ecuatoriano no habló de ninguna salida de Assange de la embajada, pero llamó a actuar a todos los gobiernos implicados en el caso, haciendo valer que dos años “es demasiado”.

Patiño dijo que “esta situación debe terminar”. “Han sido dos años perdidos para todos, de angustia e incertidumbre, y esta situación debe terminar. Es hora de liberar a Julian Assange”, declaró.

Hasta que eso ocurra, prosiguió Patiño, el gobierno del presidente Rafael Correa se compromete a “mantener la condición de asilado político de Assange y a ofrecerle protección”.

La situación, según Patiño, ha cambiado porque el Reino Unido introdujo cambios en la legislación que hacen más difícil extraditar a alguien que no ha sido acusado y porque hay un nuevo ministro de Relaciones Exteriores, Philip Hammond.


Julian Assange has had human rights violated, says Ecuador foreign minister | Media | The Guardian

Julian Assange has had human rights violated, says Ecuador foreign minister | Media | The Guardian.

Ricardo Patino says British government has no will to find a solution to stalemate that has confined WikiLeaks founder to London’s Ecuadorean embassy for more than two years
Julian Assange

Julian Assange pictured in the Ecuadorean embassy in London on 18 June 2013. Photograph: Anthony Devlin/PA

Ecuador‘s foreign minister has accused the British government of having no real interest in finding a diplomatic solution to the confinement ofJulian Assange, the WikiLeaks founder who has spent more than two years in the country’s embassy in London.

Ricardo Patino told the Guardian that he believed the UK was violating Assange’s human rights by refusing to allow him to leave the building without fear of arrest.

“I do not think there is a will [in Britain] to find a solution,” Patino said, acknowledging that without a political or legal breakthrough Assange could spend years living in a handful of tiny rooms at the country’s small west London embassy.

“The British government hasn’t taken any steps in that direction. We have made proposals, we have submitted documents, and all we have seen on the part of the British government is an increase in security to make sure Julian Assange does not leave the embassy, but there has been no political will or any steps taken towards a diplomatic solution to this.

“Everyone around the world knows that the rights of Julian Assange have been violated.”


Police access to medical records will not help the vulnerable | Deborah Orr | Comment is free | theguardian.com

Police access to medical records will not help the vulnerable | Deborah Orr | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

The police are straying too far from their remit. The last thing they should do is take on responsibilities that belong to other agencies

Police want right to see medical records without consent

 

 

Woman filing medical records
‘If a person does not want the police involved, then in some cases that’s going to make them reluctant even to turn to their GP.’ Photograph: Sean Justice/Getty Images

 

The Greater Manchester chief constable, Sir Peter Fahy, has told the Guardian that the police want quick and easy access to medical and other confidential records without the consent of the individual concerned. In the light of other recent revelations about state incursion into private data, one is tempted to note that it’s nice of them to ask.

Before stating the obvious – that this sounds horribly Kafkaesque – it’s worth mentioning the positive side of all this. It’s a good thing the police now recognise that the majority of the people who come to their attention are vulnerable and find it hard to do what’s best for themselves, let alone what’s best for those around them. It was only 20 years ago, after all, that even Britain’s prime minister, John Major, was claiming “society needs to condemn a little more and understand a little less”. So this development signals a huge change in attitudes.

However, far from being an indication that the police need more power, it’s a sign that they are now straying too far from their remit, which is to maintain law and order. Fahy himself talks of having an ability “to solve the problem without a criminal justice system approach”.

On this, he’s dead right, even though his solution is an unwelcome one. The difficulty is that the police are already too embroiled in complex cases that may involve mental health problems, learning disabilities or addictions. That is the job of social workers. Fahy says the police do not have the manpower and resources they need to deal with the problems they are being asked to become involved in. The last thing we need is for them to have less clarity of purpose.

The issue is that other agencies – primarily mental health and social work services – are even more starved of investment than the police. Fahy, in essence, is allowing his thoughts to be guided by instincts of professional closure. He understands the police are involved in matters for which they are not equipped. But his answer is to equip them, not to call for others to become equipped. He does not see that his proposal would make the vulnerable even more so.

The dangers of this approach are most clear when considering Fahy’s most controversial example – that the police should be alerted to people suffering from domestic violence even if it isn’t what they want. If a person does not want the police involved, and the involvement of health professionals may trigger that anyway, then in some cases that’s going to make them reluctant even to turn to their GP.

That’s the trouble with passing on information without people’s consent. They become more reluctant to share any information at all, even when it is dangerous for them to keep things to themselves. On the contrary, people need to be able to get help before the police become involved. Too often, matters are allowed to reach a crisis before there is much in the way of societal intervention.


Teenagers who share 'sexts' could face prosecution, police warn | Media | The Guardian

Teenagers who share ‘sexts’ could face prosecution, police warn | Media | The Guardian.

Nottinghamshire police warn that under-18s who share indecent images could end up on the register of sex offenders
  • The Guardian
Someone taking a selfie

A ‘sext’ is defined as a self-generated explicit image which is sent to other people over the internet. Photograph: David Levene

police force has warned schoolchildren who share so-called “sexts” with friends over the internet that they could face prosecution in the criminal courts.

In a letter sent to schools in Nottinghamshire, the county’s sexual exploitation investigation unit said officers were receiving reports on a daily basis of naked images being sent between teenagers using mobile phones.

In one recent case cited in the letter, a teenage girl who sent a topless picture of herself to her boyfriend was investigated after being deemed to have distributed an indecent image of a child.

The girl’s boyfriend, who forwarded the image to friends after they split up, is reported to have received a caution.

In the letter sent to school officials, Det Insp Martin Hillier warns that court action for such offences may even see a child forced to register as a sex offender.


Assange no renunciará a la protección del Estado ecuatoriano | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Assange no renunciará a la protección del Estado ecuatoriano | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

Rueda de prensa de Assange celebrada este jueves en Londres / EFE

Enviar a LinkedIn0
Enviar a TuentiEnviar a MenéameEnviar a Eskup

EnviarImprimirGuardar

El famoso huésped de la Embajada de Ecuador en Reino Unido, Julian Assange, y el ministro ecuatoriano de Exteriores, Ricardo Patiño, ofrecieron una rueda de prensa conjunta para recordar que ya han pasado dos años desde que el primero se refugiara en la oficina diplomática de Ecuador. Conectados a través de una videoconferencia ante medios de Londres y Quito, Assange reveló que no renunciará al asilo y que seguirá alojado en la embajada ecuatoriana. “Mis abogados dicen que sería tonto dejar mi condición de asilado, además las condiciones aquí son diferentes a una prisión real”, dijo. Patiño, en su turno, respondió que la protección del Estado ecuatoriano se mantendrá. “Nosotros a Julian Assange le vamos a proteger todo el tiempo que sea necesario y que él quiera”.

Las negociaciones entre Ecuador y Reino Unido para conseguir que se expida un salvoconducto al fundador del portal de filtraciones Wikileakspara que pueda salir de la embajada y viajar al país andino están en punto muerto. Patiño dijo que la iniciativa del Gobierno ecuatoriano de conformar un grupo mixto de juristas para analizar el caso, que compartió con su homólogo británico hace un año, no llegó a concretarse. “Como Estado ecuatoriano hemos hecho lo que nos corresponde hacer, consideramos que les corresponde a los organismos de las Naciones Unidas establecer un caso. Esperamos que la sociedad civil y los periodistas del mundo dejen de mantener el silencio respecto a la defensa de libertad de expresión de un periodista en el mundo”, manifestó.

El hacker australiano reveló que su equipo de defensa está compuesto por 30 personas que trabajan en varios países, muchas sin cobrar honorarios. En su intervención hizo hincapié en lo difícil que ha sido vivir alejado de sus hijos y compartió las presiones que ha soportado su familia: “Si no pueden llegar a mi, a lo mejor van a asesinar a ella o a mis hijos. Algunos parientes míos han tenido que cambiar de nombre, como mi madre, por las amenazas. No deben utilizar a mi familia por mis publicaciones, es importante tomar en serio su seguridad”.

También criticó lo gastos excesivos que ha generado su vigilancia aEstados Unidos y Reino Unido. La factura de Reino Unido ya roza los 6 millones de libras, pero se desconoce el gasto que tiene Estados Unidos. Patiño, sin revelar cifras, dijo que Ecuador solo ha reforzado la vigilancia en su oficina diplomática. “A efectos de que ninguna persona pueda abusar de una entrada en la embajada para afectar a la persona de Julian Assange y a su equipo de trabajo”, explicó.

Sobre la supervivencia de Wikileaks, Assange dijo que seguirá vigente a pesar de la estrangulamiento económico que sufre. Las cuentas de la organización en Francia y Estados Unidos han sido bloqueadas y la única libre es la Islandia. El cálculo del perjuicio económico hace un año era de unos 70 millones de dólares. “Hoy tiene que ser más”, aseguró el hacker.

Para probar la salud del portal de filtraciones reveló que justamente este jueves publicaron el borrador de una negociación secreta que afecta a 50 países y a un 68,2% del comercio mundial. Estas conversaciones se estaban produciendo fuera de los límites formales de la Organización Mundial del Comercio (OMC) con los ojos puestos en los Servicios Financieros del Acuerdo de Comercio de Servicios (TISA, por sus siglas en inglés). Wikileaks explica que estos países se llamaban a sí mismos “realmente buenos amigos de los servicios” y su objetivo era convertir a TISA en la nueva plataforma de servicios financieros.


Dos años de Assange en 20 m 2 | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Dos años de Assange en 20 m 2 | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

Se cumplen 24 meses de la entrada del ‘exhacker’ en la Embajada ecuatoriana en Londres

 

/ Londres / Quito 18 JUN 2014 – 21:40 CET

 

Assange, en una comparecencia desde la embajada, en 2012. / LEON NEAL (AFP)

 

El pulso político y diplomático que encarna el fundador de Wikileaks, Julian Assange, permanece enquistado cuando se cumplen este jueves dos años de su entrada en la Embajada de Ecuador en Londres, donde sigue refugiado bajo riesgo de ser arrestado si pone un pie fuera del recinto. Mientras el Gobierno ecuatoriano sostiene que el exhacker, que la fiscalía sueca quiere interrogar por posibles delitos sexuales, “no es un fugitivo” sino un asilado bajo su amparo, las autoridades británicas persisten en su empeño de detenerlo por haber violado los términos de la libertad condicional aquel 19 de junio de 2012, y mantienen un cerco policial en torno a la legación cuya factura ya roza los seis millones de libras.

 

En todas las entrevistas hechas a Assange, durante los dos años que lleva en el recinto diplomático, ha habido una pregunta constante. ¿Cómo es vivir en una embajada? Sus respuestas han permitido conocer que pasa los días confinado en una oficina de 20 metros cuadrados convertida en habitación. En ese espacio trabaja (jornadas de 17 horas frente a un ordenador), se ejercita (en una cinta para correr que le regaló el cineasta Ken Loach) y recibe visitas, según los reportes del periódico británico The Daily Mail en 2012. Por declaraciones de uno de sus abogados, Baltasar Garzón, se sabe que su mobiliario incluye una cama, una mesa, una estantería y ahí se acaba su mundo.

 

El propio australiano comparecerá en una rueda de prensa en conexión internauta este jueves con el ministro de Exteriores ecuatoriano, Ricardo Patiño, según este anunció su cuenta de Twitter sin precisar más detalles.


Cárcel para dos tuiteros británicos por acosar verbalmente a dos mujeres | Sociedad | EL PAÍS

Cárcel para dos tuiteros británicos por acosar verbalmente a dos mujeres | Sociedad | EL PAÍS.

La pena de prisión impuesta este viernes a dos tuiteros confirma al Reino Unido como uno de los países que trata con mayor dureza a los remitentes de mensajes abusivos, difamadores o que vierten amenazas contra otras personas. Los veinteañeros Isabella Sorley y John Nimmo han sido condenados respectivamente a doce y ocho semanas de cárcel por el acoso al que sometieron a dos mujeres a través de docenas de misivas en Twitter que incluían la amenaza de violación. Las víctimas, una destacada feminista y una diputada, fueron objeto de una intimidación “extrema” que les cambió completamente la vida, según el juez responsable de la sentencia.

“Muere, despreciable pedazo de mierda, la violación es sólo el último de tus problemas”, rezaba uno de los numerosos mensajes tuiteados por Sorley -graduada universitaria de 23 años y condenada anteriormente por comportamiento antisocial- a la activista Caroline Criado-Perez, conocida en el Reino Unido por su exitosa campaña para que los billetes bancarios incluyeran la imagen de mujeres de renombre. Lo consiguió, con el anuncio del Banco de Inglaterra de que incorporaría el rostro de la escritora Jane Austern en los billetes de 10 libras. Y ahí arrancó su pesadilla. Sorley y su colega Nimmo, un parado de 25 años, también dirigieron sus terribles misivas a la parlamentaria laborista Stella Creasy (“Las cosas que podría llegar a hacerte…”), otra de las participantes en la campaña feminista, quien aterrada reforzó la seguridad en su domicilio.


Edward Snowden es candidato a rector de la universidad de Glasgow – BioBioChile

Edward Snowden es candidato a rector de la universidad de Glasgow – BioBioChile.

 

Edward Snowden | guardianlv.comEdward Snowden | guardianlv.com

Publicado por Alberto Gonzalez | La Información es de Agencia AFP
 

El ex miembro de la Agencia Nacional de Seguridad (NSA) de Estados Unidos Edward Snowden, acusado de espionaje en su país, es candidato a rector de la universidad escocesa de Glasgow, anunció el miércoles la institución.

Cuatro personas optan al puesto: Edward Snowden -actualmente refugiado en Rusia-, el campeón ciclista escocés Graeme Obree, el escritor Alan Bissett y el sacerdote Kelvin Holdsworth.

La elección tendrá lugar el 17 y 18 de febrero.

Todos los candidatos “son personas capaces, activas en la vida pública”, estimó la universidad. El rector es elegido por los estudiantes e invitado a participar por ellos.

Snowden aceptó la invitación, cursada a través de su abogado.


Filtrar Internet: ¿una nueva función del estado? | Manzana Mecánica

Filtrar Internet: ¿una nueva función del estado? | Manzana Mecánica.

En julio de este año el Primer Ministro británico, James Cameron, anunció que los proveedores de Internet debían filtrar la pornografía para sus clientes residenciales. La razón para hacerlo: “el impacto que está teniendo en la inocencia de nuestros niños, como la pornografía en línea está corrompiendo la niñez.”

Los grandes proveedores de Internet en el Reino Unido: Sky, BT y Virgin y TalkTalk, están implementando estos sistemas de acuerdo a los lineamientos del gobierno. El principal es que cada cliente residencial debe recibir un aviso y tomar una decisión entre una conexión filtrada y una conexión sin filtrar.

Hasta el momento no hay estadísticas sobre cuánta gente elige una opción u otra, un asunto delicado porque no está claro quiénes tienen acceso a saber qué ha decidido cada cliente. Lo que sí ha ocurrido es la realización súbita de quefiltrar Internet no funciona en la práctica.

Newsnight, un programa de la BBC, realizó algunas pruebas, obteniendo los resultados esperables. De una lista de 68 sitios pornográficos, un proveedor bloqueó 62 y otro 67, pero este último también bloqueó 8 sitios que ayudan a gente que quiere luchar contra la adicción a la pornografía. Además:

Uno de los proveedores además bloqueó completamente el sitio de hosting de imágenes Imgur porque usa la misma red de distribución de contenido (CDN) que un sitio pornográfico.

¿Quiénes son realmente “los niños” para un gobierno que decide que bloquear Internet es parte de sus funciones?

En suma, considerando el tamaño de Internet y la cantidad de sitios nuevos que aparecen todos los días, no es de extrañarse que las medidas tecnológicas puedan hacer poco o nada para proteger “la inocencia de nuestros niños”. Pero más importante aún, cuando Cameron se refiere a “nuestros niños”, ¿a quiénes se refiere? ¿Quiénes son realmente “los niños” para un gobierno que decide que bloquear Internet es parte de sus funciones?


Enigma codebreaker Alan Turing receives royal pardon | Science | The Guardian

Enigma codebreaker Alan Turing receives royal pardon | Science | The Guardian.

Mathematician lost his job and was given experimental ‘chemical castration’ after being convicted for homosexual activity in 1952
Alan Turing

Alan Turing, right, with colleagues working on the Ferranti Mark I computer. Photograph: Science & Society Picture Librar/Getty Images

Alan Turing, the second world war codebreaker who took his own life after undergoing chemical castration following a conviction for homosexual activity, has been granted a posthumous royal pardon 59 years after his death.

The brilliant mathematician, who played a major role in breaking the Enigma code – which arguably shortened the war by at least two years – has been granted a pardon under the Royal Prerogative of Mercy by the Queen, following a request from the justice secretary, Chris Grayling.

Turing was considered to be the father of modern computer science and was most famous for his work in helping to create the “bombe” that cracked messages enciphered with the German Enigma machines. He was convicted of gross indecency in 1952 after admitting a sexual relationship with a man.

He was given experimental chemical castration as a “treatment”. His criminal record resulted in the loss of his security clearance and meant he was no longer able to work for Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ), where he had been employed following service at Bletchley Park during the war. He died of cyanide poisoning in 1954, aged 41.

Dr Andrew Hodges, tutorial fellow in mathematics at Wadham College, Oxford, and author of the acclaimed biography Alan Turing: The Enigma, said: “Alan Turing suffered appalling treatment 60 years ago and there has been a very well intended and deeply felt campaign to remedy it in some way. Unfortunately, I cannot feel that such a ‘pardon’ embodies any good legal principle. If anything, it suggests that a sufficiently valuable individual should be above the law which applies to everyone else.

“It’s far more important that in the 30 years since I brought the story to public attention, LGBT rights movements have succeeded with a complete change in the law – for all. So, for me, this symbolic action adds nothing.

“A more substantial action would be the release of files on Turing’s secret work for GCHQ in the cold war. Loss of security clearance, state distrust and surveillance may have been crucial factors in the two years leading up to his death in 1954.”


Former whistleblowers: open letter to intelligence employees after Snowden | Thomas Drake, Daniel Ellsberg, Katharine Gun, Peter Kofod, Ray McGovern, Jesselyn Radack, Coleen Rowley | Comment is free | theguardian.com

Former whistleblowers: open letter to intelligence employees after Snowden | Thomas Drake, Daniel Ellsberg, Katharine Gun, Peter Kofod, Ray McGovern, Jesselyn Radack, Coleen Rowley | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

Blowing the whistle on powerful factions is not a fun thing to do, but it is the last avenue for truth, balanced debate and democracy

 

 

Edward Snowden

Edward Snowden’s revelations have changed the debate on civil liberties. Photograph: Ho/AFP/Getty Images

 

At least since the aftermath of September 2001, western governments and intelligence agencies have been hard at work expanding the scope of their own power, while eroding privacy, civil liberties and public control of policy. What used to be viewed as paranoid, Orwellian, tin-foil hat fantasies turned out post-Snowden, to be not even the whole story.

What’s really remarkable is that we’ve been warned for years that these things were going on: wholesale surveillance of entire populations, militarization of the internet, the end of privacy. All is done in the name of “national security”, which has more or less become a chant to fence off debate and make sure governments aren’t held to account – that they can’t be held to account – because everything is being done in the dark. Secret laws, secret interpretations of secret laws by secret courts and no effective parliamentary oversight whatsoever.

By and large the media have paid scant attention to this, even as more and more courageous, principled whistleblowers stepped forward. The unprecedented persecution of truth-tellers, initiated by the Bush administration and severely accelerated by the Obama administration, has been mostly ignored, while record numbers of well-meaning people are charged with serious felonies simply for letting their fellow citizens know what’s going on.


Edward Snowden voted Guardian person of the year 2013 | World news | theguardian.com

Edward Snowden voted Guardian person of the year 2013 | World news | theguardian.com.

NSA whistleblower’s victory, for exposing the scale of internet surveillance, follows that of Chelsea Manning last year
Edward Snowden

In May Edward Snowden flew to Hong Kong where he gave journalists the material which blew the lid on the extent of US digital spying. Photograph: The Guardian/AFP/Getty Images

For the second year in a row, a young American whistleblower alarmed at the unfettered and at times cynical deployment of power by the world’s foremost superpower has been voted the Guardian’s person of the year.

Edward Snowden, who leaked an estimated 200,000 files that exposed the extensive and intrusive nature of phone and internet surveillance and intelligence gathering by the US and its western allies, was the overwhelming choice of more than 2,000 people who voted.

The NSA whistleblower garnered 1,445 votes. In a distant second, from a list of 10 candidates chosen by Guardian writers and editors, cameMarco Weber and Sini Saarela, the Greenpeace activists who spearheaded the oil rig protest over Russian Arctic drilling. They received 314 votes. Pope Francis gained 153 votes, narrowly ahead of blogger and anti-poverty campaigner Jack Monroe, who received 144. Snowden’s victory was as decisive as Chelsea Manning’s a year earlier.


La sombra de MacCarthy planea sobre ‘The Guardian’ | Internacional | EL PAÍS

La sombra de MacCarthy planea sobre ‘The Guardian’ | Internacional | EL PAÍS.


El director de ‘The Guardian’, Alan Rusbridger, ante la comisión de Interior de la Cámara de los Comunes. / AP

Enviar a LinkedIn1
Enviar a TuentiEnviar a MenéameEnviar a Eskup

EnviarImprimirGuardar

En Internet se pueden encontrar numerosas definiciones de maccarthysmo, o macartismo, una palabra derivada de la persecución lanzada entre 1950 y 1954 por el senador estadounidense Joe McCarthy contra supuestos comunistas y traidores a la patria, durante la guerra fría.

Olvídense de la palabra comunista, mantengan lo de traidores a la patria y piensen en lo que está ocurriendo en Reino Unido con el diarioThe Guardian por denunciar los abusos del espionaje estadounidense y británico, sino mundial, al publicar parte de los documentos que le hizo llegar el ex empleado subcontratado de la CIA Edward Snowden.

El macartismo se puede definir como “la práctica de publicitar acusaciones de deslealtad política o subversión sin atender debidamente a las pruebas”. O “el uso de métodos investigativos o acusatorios injustos con el objetivo de suprimir la oposición”. O “el uso de acusaciones sin base con cualquier objetivo”. O “el uso de acusaciones no corroboradas o técnicas investigadoras injustas en un intento por exponer deslealtad o subversión”. O “cualquier intento de restringir la crítica política o la discrepancia individual con la excusa de que es antipatriótico o pro-comunista”.

Cualquiera de ellas se puede aplicar a lo que le está pasando alGuardian, víctima de una campaña lanzada por los servicios secretos y jaleada por la prensa rival y por el primer ministro David Cameron personalmente, con el inestimable apoyo de diputados conservadores y también de algún laborista y de los medios rivales. El clímax, hasta ahora, de esa campaña se alcanzó el martes de esta semana con la comparecencia del director del periódico, Alan Rusbridger, ante la comisión de Interior de la Cámara de los Comunes.

“¿Ama usted este país?”, llegó a preguntar un diputado laborista al director de ‘The Guardian’

Esa comparecencia, en la que algunos diputados se comportaron con una fogosidad que se echó en falta cuando hace unos días los responsable de los servicios secretos comparecieron ante otra comisión parlamentaria, tuvo también su momento culminante. Fue cuando el presidente de la comisión, el incombustible diputado (más de un cuarto de siglo en la cámara) laborista Keith Vaz puso una mirada de perro degollado y con la más suave de las voces le preguntó a Rusbridger: “Parte de las críticas contra usted y The Guardian han sido muy, muy personales. Usted y yo hemos nacido fuera de este país, pero yo amo este país. ¿Ama usted este país?”. ¿Hay algo más macartista que insinuar que alguien hace algo políticamente significativo porque no es un patriota?


El ‘ángel de la guarda’ de Snowden | Internacional | EL PAÍS

El ‘ángel de la guarda’ de Snowden | Internacional | EL PAÍS.


Sarah Harrison, la semana pasada, en Berlín. / GIAN PAUL LOZZA

Enviar a LinkedIn0
Enviar a TuentiEnviar a MenéameEnviar a Eskup

EnviarImprimirGuardar

Hay una mujer que se ha quedado varada en Berlín. No quiere volver a su país de origen, Reino Unido, porque sus abogados le han dicho que corre el peligro de ser detenida. Se llama Sarah Harrison. Tiene 31 años. La mano derecha de Julian Assange en la plataforma de filtraciones WikiLeaks se convirtió el verano pasado en una tabla de salvación para Edward Snowden, el exanalista de la NSA que ha destapado el espionaje masivo que la agencia de inteligencia estadounidense ejerce a lo largo y ancho del planeta. Le solucionó la vida. O se la salvó.

Auxiliar al hombre más buscado por los servicios secretos de las superpotencias tiene un precio: no poder volver tranquilamente a casa.

La cita es en Berlín. Y nace envuelta en el misterio, como suele ser marca de la casa en la organización que comanda el editor australiano Julian Assange: cuestiones de seguridad. Hasta el último momento no se sabe dónde se realizará la entrevista. Pocos minutos antes de celebrarse, un mensaje da una indicación. Una esquina, un callejón, un viejo ascensor de mercancías y, por fin, un espacio diáfano del que no se pueden dar detalles. Sarah Harrison espera, risueña, con su chaqueta de cuero negra.

El currículum de esta británica no es poca cosa. En los últimos cuatro años ha estado en primera línea en dos de las filtraciones más importantes de la historia: los conocidos Papeles de Departamento de Estado, que exponían los tejemanejes de la política exterior estadounidense; y los Papeles de Snowden, que destapan el uso indiscriminado de programas como PRISMA para espiar las comunicaciones de toda persona fuera de territorio estadounidense, incluidos los teléfonos móviles de 35 líderes mundiales.


An open letter from Carl Bernstein to Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger | Media | theguardian.com

An open letter from Carl Bernstein to Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger | Media | theguardian.com.

Watergate scandal journalist’s letter comes as Guardian editor prepares to appear before MPs over Edward Snowden leaks

 

 

Carl Bernstein

Carl Bernstein, Watergate journalist and author, who has written a letter to the Guardian editor, Alan Rusbridger, who is to be questioned by MPs over the NSA revelations. Photograph: Teri Pengilley

 

Dear Alan,

There is plenty of time – and there are abundant venues – to debate relevant questions about Mr Snowden’s historical role, his legal fate, the morality of his actions, and the meaning of the information he has chosen to disclose.

But your appearance before the Commons today strikes me as something quite different in purpose and dangerously pernicious: an attempt by the highest UK authorities to shift the issue from government policies and excessive government secrecy in the United States and Great Britain to the conduct of the press – which has been quite admirable and responsible in the case of the Guardian, particularly, and the way it has handled information initially provided by Mr Snowden.


US charges Briton with hacking into military and Nasa systems | World news | theguardian.com

US charges Briton with hacking into military and Nasa systems | World news | theguardian.com.

Lauri Love, 28, from Sussex, indicted over alleged cybercrimes against US defence and security networks

 

 

Pentagon staff

US military staff at the Pentagon: Love is charged with hacking into secure networks to gain classified information. Photograph: Rick Wilking/Reuters

 

A British man has been charged in the US with hacking into thousands of computer systems, including those of the US army and Nasa, in an alleged attempt to steal confidential data.

Lauri Love, 28, is accused of causing millions of pounds of damage to the US government with a year-long hacking campaign waged from his home in Stradishall, a village in Suffolk.

Love was arrested on Friday by the National Crime Agency, dubbed “Britain’s FBI”, after an international investigation led by the US army’s criminal investigation command.

His arrest was announced on Monday, after US prosecutors filed an indictment in a federal court in Newark, New Jersey.

US attorney Paul Fishman said: “According to the indictment, Lauri Love and conspirators hacked into thousands of networks, including many belonging to the United States military and other government agencies.


David Cameron makes veiled threat to media over NSA and GCHQ leaks | World news | theguardian.com

David Cameron makes veiled threat to media over NSA and GCHQ leaks | World news | theguardian.com.

Prime minister alludes to courts and D notices and singles out the Guardian over coverage of Edward Snowden saga

 

 

Cameron tours the Mini car plant in Oxford.

Cameron tours the Mini car plant in Oxford. The prime minister claims he doesn’t want to have to take legal action against the Guardian and other newspapers over intelligence leaks but would rather talk to them. Photograph: Ben Birchall/PA

 

David Cameron has called on the Guardian and other newspapers to show “social responsibility” in the reporting of the leaked NSA files to avoid high court injunctions or the use of D notices to prevent the publication of information that could damage national security.

In a statement to MPs on Monday about last week’s European summit in Brussels, where he warned of the dangers of a “lah-di-dah, airy-fairy view” about the dangers of leaks, the prime minister said his preference was to talk to newspapers rather than resort to the courts. But he said it would be difficult to avoid acting if newspapers declined to heed government advice.

The prime minister issued the warning after the Tory MP Julian Smith quoted a report in Monday’s edition of the Sun that said Britain’s intelligence agencies believe details from the NSA files leaked by the US whistleblower Edward Snowden have hampered their work.


Snowden leaks: David Cameron urges committee to investigate Guardian | World news | theguardian.com

Snowden leaks: David Cameron urges committee to investigate Guardian | World news | theguardian.com.

PM says leaks have damaged national security and suggests MPs could ‘examine issue and make further recommendations’

David Cameron

David Cameron speaks during prime minister’s questions, where he said: ‘The plain fact is that what has happened has damaged national security.’ Photograph: PA

David Cameron has encouraged a Commons select committee to investigate whether the Guardian has broken the law or damaged national security by publishing secrets leaked by the National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden.

He made his proposal in response to a question from former defence secretary Liam Fox, saying the Guardian had been guilty of double standards for exposing the scandal of phone hacking by newspapersand yet had gone on to publish secrets from the NSA taken by Snowden.

Speaking at prime minister’s questions on Wednesday, Cameron said: “The plain fact is that what has happened has damaged national security and in many ways the Guardian themselves admitted that when they agreed, when asked politely by my national security adviser and cabinet secretary to destroy the files they had, they went ahead and destroyed those files.


“Fue un abuso para mandar un mensaje a mi compañero” | Internacional | EL PAÍS

“Fue un abuso para mandar un mensaje a mi compañero” | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

El novio del periodista del ‘caso Snowden’ está en el punto de mira de los servicios de inteligencia británicos

Greenwald y Miranda, a la llegada de este último a Río de Janeiro. / RICARDO MORAES (REUTERS)

David Miranda, brasileño de 28 años y novio de Glenn Greenwald, el periodista estadounidense de The Guardian que destapó el caso de espionaje de Estados Unidos está en el punto de mira de los servicios de inteligencia británicos. Miranda volvía a Brasil desde Berlín después de reunirse con la cineasta Laura Poitras, colaboradora de Greenwald en la serie de reportajes basados en las filtraciones de Edward Snowden, el exagente de la NSA (Agencia Nacional de Seguridad, en sus siglas en inglés). Tras detenerlo durante casi once horas en el aeropuerto de Heathrow y requisarle todos sus aparatos electrónicos, Scotland Yard lanzó una investigación criminal contra él. Los datos encontrados en los dos lápices USB y el disco duro que Poitras le había dado podrían atentar “gravemente contra la seguridad nacional”, mantiene la policía.


David Miranda wins partial court victory over data seized by police | World news | theguardian.com

David Miranda wins partial court victory over data seized by police | World news | theguardian.com.

David Miranda and Glenn Greenwald

David Miranda (left) and Glenn Greenwald. Miranda won a partial high court victory to stop the government and police ‘inspecting, copying or sharing’ data seized from him during his detention at Heathrow airport. Photograph: Channel 4 News

David Miranda has been granted a limited injunction at the high court to stop the government and police “inspecting, copying or sharing” data seized from him during his detention at Heathrow airport – but examination by the police for national security purposes is allowed.

Miranda had taken the government to court to try and get the data returned, but judges ruled that the police would be able to make limited use of what had been taken during his nine-hour detention on Sunday. He is the partner of Glenn Greenwald, the Guardian reporter who has exposed mass digital surveillance by US and UK spy agencies.

The court ruled the authorities must not inspect the data nor distribute it domestically or to any foreign government or agency unless it is for the purpose of ensuring the protection national security or for investigating whether Miranda is himself involved in the commission, instigation or preparation of an act of terrorism.

But the ruling also meant that data cannot be used for the purposes of criminal investigation – although the court had previously heard that the Met had launched a criminal investigation after analysing the seized data.

Detectives have been trawling through the documents that they say Miranda was carrying as he changed planes in London on his way back to Rio de Janeiro, where he lives with Greenwald..

Jonathan Laidlaw QC, appearing for the Metropolitan police, said the data contains “highly sensitive material the disclosure of which would be gravely injurious to public safety”. There were “tens of thousands” of pages of digital material, he added.


EEUU se distancia de la actuación de Inglaterra contra “Guardian” – El Mostrador

EEUU se distancia de la actuación de Inglaterra contra “Guardian” – El Mostrador.

“Es muy difícil imaginarse un escenario en el que fuera (un comportamiento) adecuado”, señaló el portavoz de la Casa Blanca, Josh Earnest.

Estados Unidos se distanció públicamente de la actuación del gobierno británico contra el diario “The Guardian”, en el marco de las presiones denunciadas por el rotativo para entregar o devolver los documentos filtrados por el ex informante de los servicios secretos estadouniense Edward Snowden.

“Es muy difícil imaginarse un escenario en el que fuera (un comportamiento) adecuado”, dijo en la noche del martes el portavoz de la Casa Blanca, Josh Earnest, al ser preguntado sobre la corrección de que funcionarios del gobierno entren en una empresa mediática para destruir discos duros.


Still wondering why we need a stateless media entity like WikiLeaks? This is why — Tech News and Analysis

Still wondering why we need a stateless media entity like WikiLeaks? This is why — Tech News and Analysis.

Summary:The detention of a journalist’s partner and seizure of his electronics, combined with the British government’s threats towards the Guardian for its reporting, make the case that we need something like WikiLeaks more than ever.

If it wasn’t already obvious that the U.S. government is targeting journalists as part of its ongoing war on leaks, it should be fairly clear now that Guardian writer Glenn Greenwald’s partner has been detained for nine hours in a British airport and had all of his electronics seized by authorities looking for classified documents like the ones Greenwald got from former CIA contractor Edward Snowden. More than anything, this kind of behavior highlights the value of having a stateless, independent media entity such as WikiLeaks.


Londres confirma que Cameron sabía de antemano que Miranda iba a ser detenido | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Londres confirma que Cameron sabía de antemano que Miranda iba a ser detenido | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

 

VÍDEO: REUTERS – LIVE! / FOTO: EFE

 

El primer ministro David Cameron sabía de antemano que David Miranda, el novio del periodista del The Guardian que destapó el ‘caso Snowden’, Glenn Greenwald, iba a ser detenido en el londinense aeropuerto de Heathrow, según una información publicada por el diario británico y confirmada por Londres. La nota del Gobierno británico ha llegado momentos después de que la Casa Blanca haya afirmado que recibió “un toque” por parte de Downing Street informando que Miranda iba a hacer escala en Heathrow en su viaje de Alemania a Brasil. Los abogados del novio de Greenwald han iniciado un proceso judicial contra la policía británica por su detención “ilegal” en el londinense aeropuerto de Heathrow durante nueve horas, según ha informado Alan Rusbridger, editor del diario británico. “David Miranda demanda como le ha sido confiscado todo su material durante los interrogatorios en el aeropuerto y por cómo le han tratado los agentes de seguridad”, aseguraba el editor en una entrevista a la BBC.


Alan Rusbridger: I would rather destroy the copied files than hand them back to the NSA and GCHQ – video | World news | theguardian.com

Alan Rusbridger: I would rather destroy the copied files than hand them back to the NSA and GCHQ – video

Beta

The Guardian’s editor reveals why and how the newspaper destroyed computer hard drives containing copies of some of the secret files leaked by Edward Snowden. The decision was taken after a threat of legal action by the British government, that could have stopped the reporting on the extent of American and British state surveillance revealed by the document

via Alan Rusbridger: I would rather destroy the copied files than hand them back to the NSA and GCHQ – video | World news | theguardian.com.


Rusbridger: destroying hard drives allowed us to continue NSA coverage | Media | theguardian.com

Rusbridger: destroying hard drives allowed us to continue NSA coverage | Media | theguardian.com.

Guardian editor-in-chief says he agreed to ‘slightly pointless’ task because newspaper has digital copies outside Britain

 

 

Alan Rusbridger

Alan Rusbridger: ‘Given that there were other copies, I saw no reason not to destroy this material ourselves.’ Photograph: /BBC News

 

Alan Rusbridger, the Guardian editor-in-chief, has said that the destruction of computer hard drives containing information provided by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden allowed the paper to continue reporting on the revelations instead of surrendering the material to UK courts.

Rusbridger told BBC Radio 4’s The World at One on Tuesday that he agreed to the “slightly pointless” task of destroying the devices – which was overseen by two GCHQ officials at the Guardian’s headquarters in London – because the newspaper is in possession of digital copies outside Britain.


Detaining my partner: a failed attempt at intimidation | Glenn Greenwald | Comment is free | theguardian.com

Detaining my partner: a failed attempt at intimidation | Glenn Greenwald | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

The detention of my partner, David Miranda, by UK authorities will have the opposite effect of the one intended

Glenn Greenwald
theguardian.com, Sunday 18 August 2013 19.44 BST

At 6:30 am this morning my time – 5:30 am on the East Coast of the US – I received a telephone call from someone who identified himself as a “security official at Heathrow airport.” He told me that my partner, David Miranda, had been “detained” at the London airport “under Schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act of 2000.”

David had spent the last week in Berlin, where he stayed with Laura Poitras, the US filmmaker who has worked with me extensively on the NSA stories. A Brazilian citizen, he was returning to our home in Rio de Janeiro this morning on British Airways, flying first to London and then on to Rio. When he arrived in London this morning, he was detained.


Londres retiene nueve horas al novio del periodista que destapó el ‘caso Snowden’ | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Londres retiene nueve horas al novio del periodista que destapó el ‘caso Snowden’ | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

El compañero del periodista de The Guardian que escribió una serie de reportajes que revelaron los programas de espionaje masivo de la Agencia Nacional de Seguridad estadounidense (NSA, en sus siglas inglesas) fue retenido este domingo en el aeropuerto de Heathrow durante casi nueve horas por las autoridades británicas cuando se disponía a viajar a Río de Janeiro.

David Miranda, que vive con el periodista Glenn Greenwald, regresaba de un viaje a Berlín cuando fue detenido por funcionarios e informado de que debía ser interrogado bajo el artículo 7 de la ley antiterrorista de 2000. La controvertida norma, que se aplica solo en aeropuertos, puertos y zonas fronterizas, permite a los funcionarios retener, interrogar y detener a individuos.

Miranda, de 28 años, fue retenido durante nueve horas, el máximo que permite la ley antes de que el individuo sea liberado o bien detenido formalmente. Según datos oficiales, la mayoría de las inquisitorias realizadas bajo el artículo 7 (el 97%) duraron menos de una hora, y solo una entre 2.000 personas investigadas fue retenida más de seis horas.

Miranda fue dejado en libertad sin cargos, pero los funcionarios confiscaron los dispositivos electrónicos que llevaba, incluidos su teléfono móvil, ordenador, cámara, memorias, DVD y juegos de consola.