Privacy experts fear Donald Trump accessing global surveillance network | World news | The Guardian

Privacy activists, human rights campaigners and former US security officials have expressed fears over the prospect of Donald Trump gaining access to the vast global US and UK surveillance network.

Fuente: Privacy experts fear Donald Trump accessing global surveillance network | World news | The Guardian


Open Data Projects Are Fueling the Fight Against Police Misconduct

situation is beginning to change — as a growing number of police accountability groups are starting to bypass the departments by aggregating and distributing misconduct history databases on their own.

Fuente: Open Data Projects Are Fueling the Fight Against Police Misconduct


Tech start-up Dwolla fined $100,000 for cyber defence flaws – FT.com

A financial technology start-up has been fined $100,000 for deficiencies in its cyber defence systems in a sign that new online payment networks are facing tougher scrutiny from regulators.The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau on Wednesday handed its first penalty for data security shortcomings to Dwolla, an ecommerce company that is little more than five years old.

Fuente: Tech start-up Dwolla fined $100,000 for cyber defence flaws – FT.com


The new way police are surveilling you: Calculating your threat ‘score’ – The Washington Post

Some local police departments scan social media, send drones aloft and monitor surveillance cameras.

Fuente: The new way police are surveilling you: Calculating your threat ‘score’ – The Washington Post


Aprueban ley que obliga a almacenar datos de internet

Aprueban ley que obliga a almacenar datos de internet.

Aprueban  ley que obliga a almacenar datos de internet

Objetivo. La ley pretende poder ubicar desde qué computadora se cometen los delitos.

 

 

La Cámara de Senadores aprobó ayer un proyecto de ley que obliga a las operadoras de internet a almacenar datos de tráfico (IP) por el periodo de un año, a fin de ubicar el origen de las publicaciones.

 

 

El proyecto, que fue presentado en la sesión ordinaria por el senador Arnaldo Giuzzio, se aprobó con modificaciones tras la objeción por parte de algunos parlamentarios del punto en que indicaba quién podía requerir esta información, debido que se temía que pueda ser utilizado de manera irresponsable.

El texto original indicaba en su artículo primero que estos datos podían ser requeridos por “la autoridad competente, juez y fiscal, cuando lo requieran” y en el artículo séptimo establecía que la entrega de los datos debía realizarse “al Ministerio Público o Juzgado competente”.

Tras la objeción por parte de algunos legisladores, entre ellos la senadora de Desirée Masi, finalmente se estableció que se especifica que se podrá realizar el pedido solo a través de un juez.

Fines. Giuzzio indicó que de todos los casos investigados por pornografía infantil, el 80 por ciento no avanzan porque la falta de almacenamiento de IP por parte de las proveedoras de internet no permiten identificar a los autores del ilícito.

Comentó que con esta ley se podrá saber el origen de los mensajes en casos investigados por estafa mediante internet, e incluso en el combate al autodenominado Ejército del Pueblo Paraguayo (EPP).

Como ejemplo recordó el video del autodenominado EPP que se declaraba la autoría de la quema de una comisaría, donde la Fiscalía solicitó a la matriz de Facebook el origen del video, en Estados Unidos. El dato decía ‘Paraguay’, pero el IP no pudo ser identificado porque las operadoras no retenían la información, señaló.


Police access to medical records will not help the vulnerable | Deborah Orr | Comment is free | theguardian.com

Police access to medical records will not help the vulnerable | Deborah Orr | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

The police are straying too far from their remit. The last thing they should do is take on responsibilities that belong to other agencies

Police want right to see medical records without consent

 

 

Woman filing medical records
‘If a person does not want the police involved, then in some cases that’s going to make them reluctant even to turn to their GP.’ Photograph: Sean Justice/Getty Images

 

The Greater Manchester chief constable, Sir Peter Fahy, has told the Guardian that the police want quick and easy access to medical and other confidential records without the consent of the individual concerned. In the light of other recent revelations about state incursion into private data, one is tempted to note that it’s nice of them to ask.

Before stating the obvious – that this sounds horribly Kafkaesque – it’s worth mentioning the positive side of all this. It’s a good thing the police now recognise that the majority of the people who come to their attention are vulnerable and find it hard to do what’s best for themselves, let alone what’s best for those around them. It was only 20 years ago, after all, that even Britain’s prime minister, John Major, was claiming “society needs to condemn a little more and understand a little less”. So this development signals a huge change in attitudes.

However, far from being an indication that the police need more power, it’s a sign that they are now straying too far from their remit, which is to maintain law and order. Fahy himself talks of having an ability “to solve the problem without a criminal justice system approach”.

On this, he’s dead right, even though his solution is an unwelcome one. The difficulty is that the police are already too embroiled in complex cases that may involve mental health problems, learning disabilities or addictions. That is the job of social workers. Fahy says the police do not have the manpower and resources they need to deal with the problems they are being asked to become involved in. The last thing we need is for them to have less clarity of purpose.

The issue is that other agencies – primarily mental health and social work services – are even more starved of investment than the police. Fahy, in essence, is allowing his thoughts to be guided by instincts of professional closure. He understands the police are involved in matters for which they are not equipped. But his answer is to equip them, not to call for others to become equipped. He does not see that his proposal would make the vulnerable even more so.

The dangers of this approach are most clear when considering Fahy’s most controversial example – that the police should be alerted to people suffering from domestic violence even if it isn’t what they want. If a person does not want the police involved, and the involvement of health professionals may trigger that anyway, then in some cases that’s going to make them reluctant even to turn to their GP.

That’s the trouble with passing on information without people’s consent. They become more reluctant to share any information at all, even when it is dangerous for them to keep things to themselves. On the contrary, people need to be able to get help before the police become involved. Too often, matters are allowed to reach a crisis before there is much in the way of societal intervention.