Chelsea Manning: I leaked reports after seeing how Americans ignored wars | US news | The Guardian

Manning describes ‘two worlds’ – one in the US and one she witnessed in Iraq – in New York Times interview days after her release from military prison

Fuente: Chelsea Manning: I leaked reports after seeing how Americans ignored wars | US news | The Guardian


The U.S. Has Ramped Up Airstrikes Against ISIS in Raqqa, and Syrian Civilians Are Paying the Price

Thanks to camera phones and social media, the deadly consequences of U.S. military operations are indeed being recorded, shared, and watched around the world on an unprecedented scale. But while civilian deaths are regularly reported in local media outlets in the Middle East, they are seldom reported in detail by international media.

Fuente: The U.S. Has Ramped Up Airstrikes Against ISIS in Raqqa, and Syrian Civilians Are Paying the Price


Chelsea Manning released from military prison | US news | The Guardian

Chelsea Manning, the army private who released a vast trove of US state secrets and was punished by the US military for months in penal conditions denounced by the UN as torture, has been released from a military prison in Kansas after serving seven years of a 35-year sentence.

Fuente: Chelsea Manning released from military prison | US news | The Guardian


Trump’s CIA Director Pompeo, Targeting WikiLeaks, Explicitly Threatens Speech and Press Freedoms

“To give them the space to crush us with misappropriated secrets is a perversion of what our great Constitution stands for. It ends now.” At no point did Pompeo specify what steps the CIA intended to take to ensure that the “space” to publish secrets “ends now.”

Fuente: Trump’s CIA Director Pompeo, Targeting WikiLeaks, Explicitly Threatens Speech and Press Freedoms


Forget Trump’s tweets and media bans. The real issue is his threat to the internet | Charles Ferguson | Opinion | The Guardian

Deregulation could allow the president to undermine freedom of speech in a way that was beyond even Nixon

Fuente: Forget Trump’s tweets and media bans. The real issue is his threat to the internet | Charles Ferguson | Opinion | The Guardian


Julian Assange: ‘Chelsea Manning clemency was bid to make life hard for me’ | Media | The Guardian

WikiLeaks founder qualifies his pledge to accept extradition to the US in interview with Australian current affairs programme The Project

Fuente: Julian Assange: ‘Chelsea Manning clemency was bid to make life hard for me’ | Media | The Guardian


Julian Assange confirms he is willing to travel to US after Manning decision | Media | The Guardian

WikiLeaks tweeted last week that Assange would agree to US extradition if Obama granted Manning clemency. Asked during a web broadcast on Thursday if he would now leave the embassy, Assange said: “I stand by everything I said, including the offer to go to the United States if Chelsea Manning’s sentence was commuted.”

Fuente: Julian Assange confirms he is willing to travel to US after Manning decision | Media | The Guardian


Chelsea Manning did the right thing. Finally, Barack Obama has too | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian

At the time of her revelations, she was the most important whistleblower since Daniel Ellsberg. Upon hearing the news today, Ellsberg said this: “Once in a while, someone does what they ought to do. Some go to prison for it, for seven years; some accept exile for life. But sometimes even a president does it. And today, it was Obama.”

Fuente: Chelsea Manning did the right thing. Finally, Barack Obama has too | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian


Julian Assange ready for US extradition, one of his lawyers suggests | Media | The Guardian

A lawyer for Julian Assange has indicated that the WikiLeaks founder is ready to face extradition to the US after Barack Obama commuted the sentence of US army whistleblower Chelsea Manning.

Fuente: Julian Assange ready for US extradition, one of his lawyers suggests | Media | The Guardian


Chelsea Manning’s prison sentence commuted by Barack Obama | US news | The Guardian

The White House insisted on Tuesday that Assange’s offer to submit to extradition if Obama “grants Manning clemency” did not influence the president’s action.

Fuente: Chelsea Manning’s prison sentence commuted by Barack Obama | US news | The Guardian


Obama libera a exsoldado que actuó como fuente en caso WikiLeaks

El presidente estadounidense, Barack Obama, conmutó la pena de prisión a quien fuera fuente de Wikileaks, Chelsea Manning.Según la información de la Casa Blanca, la exsoldado será liberada el próximo 17 de mayo, aunque se encontraba condenada a una pena de cárcel de 35 años.

Fuente: Obama libera a exsoldado que actuó como fuente en caso WikiLeaks


WashPost Is Richly Rewarded for False News About Russia Threat While Public Is Deceived

The most ironic aspect of all this is that it is mainstream journalists — the very people who have become obsessed with the crusade against Fake News — who play the key role in enabling and fueling this dissemination of false stories. They do so not only by uncritically spreading them, but also by taking little or no steps to notify the public of their falsity.

Fuente: WashPost Is Richly Rewarded for False News About Russia Threat While Public Is Deceived


Russia Hysteria Infects WashPost Again: False Story About Hacking U.S. Electric Grid

Those interested in a sober and rational discussion of the Russia hacking issue should read the following:(1) Three posts by cybersecurity expert Jeffrey Carr: first, on the difficulty of proving attribution for any hacks; second, on the irrational claims on which the “Russia hacked the DNC” case is predicated; and third, on the woefully inadequate, evidence-free report issued by the Department of Homeland Security and FBI this week to justify sanctions against Russia.(2) Yesterday’s Rolling Stone article by Matt Taibbi, who lived and worked for more than a decade in Russia, titled: “Something About This Russia Story Stinks.”(3) An Atlantic article by David A. Graham on the politics and strategies of the sanctions imposed this week on Russia by Obama; I disagree with several of his claims, but the article is a rarity: a calm, sober, rational assessment of this debate.

Fuente: Russia Hysteria Infects WashPost Again: False Story About Hacking U.S. Electric Grid


The Guardian’s Summary of Julian Assange’s Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False

one’s views of Assange are completely irrelevant to this article, which is not about Assange. This article, instead, is about a report published this week by The Guardian that recklessly attributed to Assange comments that he did not make. This article is about how those false claims — fabrications, really — were spread all over the internet by journalists, causing hundreds of thousands of people (if not millions) to consume false news. The purpose of this article is to underscore, yet again, that those who most flamboyantly denounce Fake News, and want Facebook and other tech giants to suppress content in the name of combating it, are often the most aggressive and self-serving perpetrators of it.

Fuente: The Guardian’s Summary of Julian Assange’s Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False


A Clinton Fan Manufactured Fake News That MSNBC Personalities Spread to Discredit WikiLeaks Docs

The phrase “Fake News” has exploded in usage since the election, but the term is similar to other malleable political labels such as “terrorism” and “hate speech”; because the phrase lacks any clear definition, it is essentially useless except as an instrument of propaganda and censorship. The most important fact to realize about this new term: Those who most loudly denounce Fake News are typically those most aggressively disseminating it.

Fuente: A Clinton Fan Manufactured Fake News That MSNBC Personalities Spread to Discredit WikiLeaks Docs


Edward Snowden backers beam calls for pardon on Washington news museum | US news | The Guardian

Now the most audacious display of support for Snowden is under way. Messages calling for his pardon are being beamed on to the outside wall of the Newseum, the Washington institution devoted to freedom of speech and the press that stands less than two miles from the White House.

Fuente: Edward Snowden backers beam calls for pardon on Washington news museum | US news | The Guardian


La corrupción y la caída final de los Clinton – El Mostrador

Y pese a que la prensa mayoritaria lo negaba en forma maniaca, los correos filtrados por Wikileaks eran viralizados por las redes sociales, dando cuenta de una serie de situaciones como las siguientes: cerca de la mitad de las personas que lograron tener acceso a Hillary Clinton mientras era Secretaria de Estado, habían hecho, en los días previos, importantes donaciones a la Fundación Clinton (pay to play); su jefe de campaña era al mismo tiempo lobbista de los gobiernos de Arabia Saudita y Qatar (acusados de ser financistas de ISIS), para los cuales consiguió millonarias ventas de armas (durante el periodo en que Clinton fue Secretaria de Estado las exportaciones de armas duplicaron a las realizadas en tiempos de Bush).

Fuente: La corrupción y la caída final de los Clinton – El Mostrador


In the Trump Era, Leaking and Whistleblowing Are More Urgent, and More Noble, Than Ever

One of the very few remaining avenues for learning what the U.S. government is doing — beyond the propaganda that it wants Americans to ingest and thus deliberately disseminates through media outlets — is leaking and whistleblowing. Among the leading U.S. heroes in the war on terror have been the men and women inside various agencies of the U.S. government who discovered serious wrongdoing being carried out in secret, and then risked their own personal welfare to ensure that the public learned of what never should have been hidden in the first place.

Fuente: In the Trump Era, Leaking and Whistleblowing Are More Urgent, and More Noble, Than Ever


Social media alone understood the Donald Trump story

That which US journalism proclaims as its most precious contribution to a democratic polity, that it finds and publishes the facts, shorn of bias, was absent this week. Neither the journalism of facts nor the algorithms of the polling organisations could grasp the popular swell of affection for a candidate that nearly all mainstream media found irredeemably flawed — perhaps because he was flawed.The media that do get it are those that carry emotion: social media above all others.

Fuente: Social media alone understood the Donald Trump story


US and Ecuador deny conspiring to take Julian Assange offline | Media | The Guardian

The journalist John Pilger, a close ally and frequent visitor of Assange in the embassy, told the Guardian that Assange “will have a contingency”, and stressed that WikiLeaks was bigger than its founder.“I can’t imagine that the restrictions will stop the leaks or deter WikiLeaks and Assange,” he said. “The significance of the action by Ecuador, which is clearly under pressure, is to show how frightened the US establishment is of further revelations reaching the public about its preferred presidential candidate.”

Fuente: US and Ecuador deny conspiring to take Julian Assange offline | Media | The Guardian


Ecuador Cuts Internet Access for Julian Assange to Preserve Neutrality in U.S. Election

The government of Ecuador confirmed on Tuesday that it had decided “to temporarily restrict access” to the internet inside its embassy in London, effectively cutting off Julian Assange, the editor of Wikileaks, who has lived there since he was granted political asylum in 2012.Assange first reported on Monday that his internet connection had been “severed by a state party,” and the organization was forced to resort to a back-up plan to continue its work.

Fuente: Ecuador Cuts Internet Access for Julian Assange to Preserve Neutrality in U.S. Election


Ecuador cortó internet en embajada donde está Assange – El Mostrador

El secretario de Estado de EE.UU., John Kerry, pidió a ese país que evitara que el fundador de WikiLeaks divulgara información clasificada de la candidata demócrata a la Casa Blanca, sobre las negociaciones de paz entre el Gobierno colombiano y las FARC.

Fuente: Ecuador cortó internet en embajada donde está Assange – El Mostrador


If Trump leaks are OK and Clinton leaks aren’t, there’s a problem | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian

Journalists should always publish newsworthy information – even if its from a potentially biased source. This election should be no different

Fuente: If Trump leaks are OK and Clinton leaks aren’t, there’s a problem | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian


In the Democratic Echo Chamber, Inconvenient Truths Are Recast as Putin Plots

To see how extreme and damaging this behavior has become, let’s just quickly examine two utterly false claims that Democrats over the past four days — led by party-loyal journalists — have disseminated and induced thousands of people, if not more, to believe.

Fuente: In the Democratic Echo Chamber, Inconvenient Truths Are Recast as Putin Plots


It might be trending, but that doesn’t make it true | John Naughton | Opinion | The Guardian

As the fallout from the first US presidential debate showed, taking social media at face value is foolhardy

Fuente: It might be trending, but that doesn’t make it true | John Naughton | Opinion | The Guardian


Washington Post says Obama should not pardon whistleblower Ed Snowden | Media | The Guardian

Newspaper criticised for calling for the criminal prosecution of its own source, on ‘whose back the paper won and eagerly accepted a Pulitzer Prize’

Fuente: Washington Post says Obama should not pardon whistleblower Ed Snowden | Media | The Guardian


New Film Tells the Story of Edward Snowden; Here Are the Surveillance Programs He Helped Expose

Oliver Stone’s latest film, “Snowden,” bills itself as a dramatized version of the life of Edward Snowden, the NSA whistleblower who revealed the global extent of U.S. surveillance capabilities.

Fuente: New Film Tells the Story of Edward Snowden; Here Are the Surveillance Programs He Helped Expose


Gremio histórico de los periódicos de EE.UU. se deshace del “papel” y se abre a los medios digitales – El Mostrador

Dejó de llamarse “Newspaper Association of America” y pasó a ser la News Media Alliance, porque según su presidente ejecutivo, David Chavern,“newspaper” ya no es la palabra adecuada para referirse a muchos miembros del grupo, como The Washington Post, The New York Times y Dow Jones, que si bien son impresos, tienen gran parte de su lectoría a través de la web.

Fuente: Gremio histórico de los periódicos de EE.UU. se deshace del “papel” y se abre a los medios digitales – El Mostrador


“El Watergate es una ilusión diseñada por Hollywood”

“La gestión de los Papeles de Panamá es un ataque a nuestro modelo”, asegura el fundador de Wikileaks, muy crítico con el Consorcio Internacional de Periodistas de Investigación que ha publicado esta última gran filtración”Los medios establecidos tienen que limitarse constantemente bajo los poderes del establishment, los poderes del Estado al que pertenecen”, dice Assange en esta entrevista con eldiario.es en la Embajada de Ecuador en Londres

Fuente: “El Watergate es una ilusión diseñada por Hollywood”


Democrats stream gun control sit-in on Periscope after Republicans turn TV cameras off | US news | The Guardian

Nicky Woolf in San Francisco@nickywoolfThursday 23 June 2016 07.32 BSTLast modified on Thursday 23 June 2016 08.28 BST Share on LinkedIn Share on Google+Shares1,259Comments274Save for laterLawmakers turned to Periscope and Facebook Live to broadcast a sit-in protest in the House of Representatives on Wednesday after the Speaker’s office switched off the TV cameras inside the chamber.

Fuente: Democrats stream gun control sit-in on Periscope after Republicans turn TV cameras off | US news | The Guardian


Exclusive: Pentagon source goes on record against whistleblower program – video | World news | The Guardian

A former Pentagon investigator has spoken on record to the Guardian about major privacy and security lapses within the government’s whistleblower program. John Crane, who for 25 years worked for the Department of Defense inspector general’s office, which helps federal employees expose abuse and corruption, says whistleblowers like Edward Snowden had little choice but to go outside the system. His revelations can now be made public for the first time

Fuente: Exclusive: Pentagon source goes on record against whistleblower program – video | World news | The Guardian


The Intercept Is Broadening Access to the Snowden Archive. Here’s Why

SIDtoday is the internal newsletter for the NSA’s most important division, the Signals Intelligence Directorate. After editorial review, The Intercept is releasing nine years’ worth of newsletters in batches, starting with 2003. The agency’s spies explain a surprising amount about what they were doing, how they were doing it, and why.

Fuente: The Intercept Is Broadening Access to the Snowden Archive. Here’s Why


The Intercept Is Broadening Access to the Snowden Archive. Here’s Why

From the time we began reporting on the archive provided to us in Hong Kong by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, we sought to fulfill his two principal requests for how the materials should be handled: that they be released in conjunction with careful reporting that puts the documents in context and makes them digestible to the public, and that the welfare and reputations of innocent people be safeguarded. As time has gone on, The Intercept has sought out new ways to get documents from the archive into the hands of the public, consistent with the public interest as originally conceived.Today, The Intercept is announcing two innovations in how we report on and publish these materials. Both measures are designed to ensure that reporting on the archive continues in as expeditious and informative a manner as possible, in accordance with the agreements we entered into with our source about how these materials would be disclosed, a framework that he, and we, have publicly described on numerous occasions.

Fuente: The Intercept Is Broadening Access to the Snowden Archive. Here’s Why


Those Demanding Free Speech Limits to Fight ISIS Pose a Greater Threat to U.S. Than ISIS

We’ve been told for years that The Terrorists “hate our freedoms,” yet we cannot seem to rid ourselves of those who think the solution is to voluntarily abolish those freedoms ourselves.

Fuente: Those Demanding Free Speech Limits to Fight ISIS Pose a Greater Threat to U.S. Than ISIS


Edward Snowden's message to Guardian readers – video | Membership | The Guardian

Edward Snowden’s message to Guardian readers – video | Membership | The Guardian.

Guardian defence and intelligence correspondent Ewen MacAskill reads out a message to Guardian readers at a Members’ screening of Citizenfour in London. MacAskill joined editor-in-chief Alan Rusbriger, Janine Gibson and Stuart Millar to discuss the Snowden story in Kings Place on 2 March 2015.


The "Snowden is Ready to Come Home!" Story: a Case Study in Typical Media Deceit – The Intercept

The “Snowden is Ready to Come Home!” Story: a Case Study in Typical Media Deceit – The Intercept.

Featured photo - The “Snowden is Ready to Come Home!” Story: a Case Study in Typical Media Deceit

Most sentient people rationally accept that the U.S. media routinely disseminates misleading stories and outright falsehoods in the most authoritative tones. But it’s nonetheless valuable to examine particularly egregious case studies to see how that works. In that spirit, let’s take yesterday’s numerous, breathless reports trumpeting the “BREAKING” news that “Edward Snowden now wants to come home!” and is “now negotiating the terms of his return!”

Ever since Snowden revealed himself to the public 20 months ago, he has repeatedly said the same exact thing when asked about his returning to the U.S.: I would love to come home, and would do so if I could get a fair trial, but right now, I can’t.

His primary rationale for this argument has long been that under the Espionage Act, the 1917 statute under which he has been charged, he would be barred by U.S. courts from even raising his key defense: that the information he revealed to journalists should never have been concealed in the first place and he was thus justified in disclosing it to journalists. In other words, when U.S. political and media figures say Snowden should “man up,” come home and argue to a court that he did nothing wrong, they are deceiving the public, since they have made certain that whistleblowers charged with “espionage” are legally barred from even raising that defense.


Citizenfour: no es ciencia ficción

Citizenfour: no es ciencia ficción.

El documental de Laura Poitras cuenta los primeros momentos de la mayor filtración de espionaje de un Gobierno en la historia

La existencia de un segundo filtrador dentro de la NSA y el reencuentro de Snowden con su pareja en Moscú son las dos revelaciones del documental

La fecha de estreno en España está prevista para el 27 de marzo

Edward Snowden, en una de las imágenes del documental de Laura Poitras, Citizenfour.

Edward Snowden, en una de las imágenes del documental de Laura Poitras, Citizenfour.

La película de Laura Poitras es un documental imprescindible para entender esta nueva etapa de internet. Citizenfour es, primero, un documento histórico que recoge de primerísima mano el encuentro de Edward Snowden con los periodistas que le ayudaron a revelar al mundo el mayor espionaje masivo conocido; y después, una película inquietante, donde es la información y no la música la que nos hace darnos cuenta de que no estamos viendo ciencia ficción.

Como dice Snowden a un absorto Glenn Greenwald tras contarle cómo funciona XKeyscore, un programa de la NSA: “Esto ya está sucediendo”.


How have journalists responded to revelations of mass surveillance? | Technology | The Guardian

How have journalists responded to revelations of mass surveillance? | Technology | The Guardian.

Two thirds of investigative journalists think they're being spied on, and many are taking action to combat that.

 Two thirds of investigative journalists think they’re being spied on, and many are taking action to combat that. Photograph: PAWEL KOPCZYNSKI/REUTERS

NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden’s revelations of mass surveillance by government agencies has made a big impact on investigative journalists, according to a new study.

The survey of 671 journalists, conducted by the US-based Pew Research Center and Columbia University’s Tow Center for Digital Journalism, found that 64% believe that the US government has probably collected data about their communications.

49% said that they have changed the way they store and share potentially sensitive documents in the last year as a result, while 29% have altered the way they communicate with fellow journalists.

However, only 3% have opted not to pursue a particular story due to concerns about electronic surveillance and hacking, although 13% have not reached out to a particular source for those reasons. Just 2% have considered abandoning investigative journalism.


WikiLeaks threatens legal action against Google and US after email revelations | Technology | The Guardian

WikiLeaks threatens legal action against Google and US after email revelations | Technology | The Guardian.

 in New York

WikiLeaks Sarah Harrison
 WikiLeaks journalist Sarah Harrison addresses the media at the Geneva Press Club on Tuesday. Photograph: Pierre Albouy/Reuters

WikiLeaks is fighting back in an escalating war with both Google and the US government, threatening legal action the day after demanding answers for the tech giant’s wholesale handover of its staffers’ Gmail contents to US law enforcement.

The targets of the investigation were not notified until two and a half years after secret search warrants were issued and served by the FBI, legal representatives for WikiLeaks said in a press conference on Monday.

“We’re looking at legal action not only with Google but to those who actually turned in the order,” said Baltasar Garzón, the head of Julian Assange’s legal defence team. Calling the order illegal and arbitrary, Garzón said insisted “any information that would be used from the taking of documents [this way] will be considered as biased, illegal and will cancel the whole proceedings.”

“I’m not sure what craziness – what desperation – went into the US to make them behave this way, but this is … a clear violation of rights,” Garzón said.

“Our policy is to tell people about government requests for their data, except in limited cases, like when we are gagged by a court order, which sadly happens quite frequently,” a Google spokesperson said in a statement to the Guardian. “We’ve challenged many orders related to WikiLeaks which has led to disclosures to people who are affected. We’ve also pushed to unseal all the documents related to the investigation.”

Michael Ratner, a member of the Assange legal team in the US and president emeritus of the Center for Constitutional Rights, said that WikiLeaks had sent a letter to Google’s executive chairman, Eric Schmidt, asking why the company waited so long before notifying the targets of the warrants.

On Monday, Ratner went further, saying that WikiLeaks would decide on what legal action to take depending on Google’s response to the letter, which he said was expected within a week.

The notification of the court order was sent by email from Google to WikiLeaks on 23 December 2014 – just before Christmas, a typically quiet time for the news cycle – and was published on WikiLeaks’ site. Google said the legal process was initially subject to a nondisclosure or “gag” order that prohibited Google from disclosing the existence of the legal process.

Ratner told the Guardian that there were several questions as to what that legal process entailed. “Did Google go to court at all?” Ratner said. “Would they have notified us that that ‘we went to court and we lost?’ I don’t know.”

“If they didn’t go to court, that would not be a great move by Google, because you would expect them to litigate on behalf of their subscribers,” he said.

“Perhaps after the Snowden revelation, Google got nervous and decided to go to court,” Ratner added. “My big thing is: did they go to court initially? If they didn’t, I would consider that a real failure.”

The Google court order targeted three WikiLeaks employees: journalist Sarah Harrison, spokesperson and journalist Kristinn Hrafnsson and editor Joseph Farrell.

The wide-ranging scope of the order meant that all email content, including deleted emails, drafts, place and time of login, plus contact lists and all emails sent and received by the three targets – for the entire history of their email account up to the date of the order – had to be handed over to the FBI.


EE UU condena a un exagente de la CIA por revelar información clasificada | Internacional | EL PAÍS

EE UU condena a un exagente de la CIA por revelar información clasificada | Internacional | EL PAÍS.


Jeffrey Sterling fue acusado de entregar a un periodista datos de un programa contra el sistema nuclear iraní

James Risen, el periodista del ‘Times’ que supuestamente recibió información secreta del agente. / BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (AFP)

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El triángulo lo forman un periodista del diario The New York Times, un exagente de los servicios de inteligencia y el Gobierno de Estados Unidos. En el centro, un programa de la CIA para sabotear el sistema nuclear de Irán. Es uno de los nueve casos en los que la Administración del presidente Barack Obama se ha querellado contra un espía por filtrar información a la prensa. Y ha vuelto a ganar.

Jeffrey Sterling fue condenado este lunes por nueve cargos que abarcan desde revelar información relativa a la “seguridad nacional” a James Risen, periodista y escritor del Times, hasta obstrucción a la justicia. El exagente, de 47 años, permanecerá en libertad hasta el 24 de abril, cuando conozca su sentencia, tras pasar los últimos cinco años intentando demostrar su inocencia.

El Fiscal General, Eric Holder, ha calificado la decisión del jurado en contra de Sterling como “justa y apropiada”. Según el responsable del Departamento de Justicia, “las filtraciones pusieron vidas en peligro y constituyeron una grave violación de la confianza depositada por los ciudadanos” en el agente.

El Gobierno ha asegurado durante el desarrollo de este caso que Sterling actuó por despecho tras ser despedido de la CIA en 2003. El exagente habría contactado con Risen para denunciar lo que consideraba un caso de discriminación laboral, aunque después acabó proporcionándole más información sobre el programa en el que había trabajado y que tenía como objetivo sabotear el sistema nuclear iraní.

El debate sobre la protección de reporteros ha llegado hasta el Congreso, donde se debatió la creación de una nueva ley ‘escudo’ para la prensa

El caso de Sterling cobró especial relevancia en EE UU por estar implicado un periodista del diario más importante del país y que declaró estar dispuesto a ingresar en prisión antes que revelar su fuente. Según el Gobierno, la persona de la que recibió datos para su libro ‘State of War’ siempre fue Sterling, quien no sólo dio detalles de las operaciones en las que estuvo implicado, sino que también puso en peligro a otros agentes.

La negativa de Risen reabrió además un debate entre los medios estadounidenses sobre la protección de sus periodistas en casos como éste. El Gobierno no se querelló contra el escritor, pero sí le exigió que revelara su fuente. A pesar de que el derecho a la confidencialidad sobre el origen de la información está reconocido en varios países e instituciones internacionales, el Gobierno federal de EE UU no lo estipula, por lo que Risen podía haber ido a prisión.


Wikileaks estudia demandar a Google por entregar información a EE UU | Tecnología | Cinco Días

Wikileaks estudia demandar a Google por entregar información a EE UU | Tecnología | Cinco Días.


Wikileaks estudia demandar a Google por entregar información a EE UU

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El equipo jurídico del portal Wikileaks, liderado por el exjuez de la Audiencia Nacional española Baltasar Garzón, está estudiando emprender acciones legales contra Google por haber entregado a las autoridades estadounidenses información digital de periodistas de la web.

Así lo anunció hoy el propio jurista en una rueda de prensa en Ginebra, donde expuso la situación personal y jurídica en la que se encuentra el fundador de Wikileaks, Julian Assange, y todas las personas que trabajan en el portal responsable de la filtración de miles de documentos secretos de EEUU.

Garzón explicó que el pasado 23 de diciembre supieron que Google había transmitido a las autoridades estadounidenses toda la información digital con la que contaban de tres periodistas, los británicos Sarah Harrison y Joseph Farrell, y el islandés Kristinn Hrafnsson.

“La obtención de esa información es totalmente arbitraria e ilícita, la obtención ilegal de estos documentos puede impugnar todo el procedimiento”, afirmó Garzón, quien recordó que lo mínimo que Google habría debido hacer era informar a los periodistas de que las autoridades estadounidenses requerían dicha información.


Barrett Brown’s sentence is unjust, but it may become the norm for journalists – Boing Boing

Barrett Brown’s sentence is unjust, but it may become the norm for journalists – Boing Boing.

A journalist was jailed after sharing a hyperlink to a stolen document that he did not steal, and despite the fact that he was not guilty of a crime for linking to it.

By Trevor Timm

Investigative journalist Barrett Brown was sentenced to an obscene 63 months in prison on Thursday, in part for sharing a hyperlink to a stolen document that he did not steal, and despite the fact that he was not guilty of a crime for linking to it.

 

Maybe journalists think this is an anomaly, and some will ignore his case entirely since Brown also pled guilty to other charges that led to part of his sentence too. But be warned: if the White House passes its dramatic expansion of US computer law, journalists will constantly be under similar threat and reporting on hacked documents could become a crime.

How is this possible, you ask? Well, first it’s important to understand the details of Brown’s case.


Journalist Barrett Brown sentenced to 63 months in federal prison – Boing Boing

Journalist Barrett Brown sentenced to 63 months in federal prison – Boing Boing.

He’s already served more than two years in prison on charges related to sources within the Anonymous hacktivist entity.

By Xeni Jardin

A court in Dallas has sentenced Barrett Brown to 63 months in federal prison, minus 28 months already served. For count one in the case, he receives 48 months. For count 2, he receives 12 months. And for count 3, he receives 3 months. He is also ordered to pay $890,000 in restitution.

The government’s charges against the intelligence and security reporter stemmed from his relationship with sources close to the hacker group Anonymous, and the fact that Brown published a link to publicly-available copies of leaked Stratfor documents.

Brown read a statement to the court during the sentencing hearing, and you can read that statement in entirety here.

“Journalists are especially vulnerable right now, Your Honor, and they become more so when the FBI feels comfortable making false claims about them,” Brown wrote:

 

Deny being a spokesperson for Anonymous hundreds of times, and you’re still a spokesperson for Anonymous. Deny being a journalist once or twice, and you’re not a journalist. What conclusion can one draw from this sort of reasoning other than that you are whatever the FBI finds it convenient for you to be at any given moment. This is not the “rule of law”, Your Honor, it is the “rule of law enforcement”, and it is very dangerous.


North Korea/Sony Story Shows How Eagerly U.S. Media Still Regurgitate Government Claims – The Intercept

North Korea/Sony Story Shows How Eagerly U.S. Media Still Regurgitate Government Claims – The Intercept.

BY GLENN GREENWALD 

Featured photo - North Korea/Sony Story Shows How Eagerly U.S. Media Still Regurgitate Government Claims

The identity of the Sony hackers is still unknown. President Obama, in a December 19 press conference, announced: “We can confirm that North Korea engaged in this attack.” He then vowed: “We will respond. . . . We cannot have a society in which some dictator some place can start imposing censorship here in the United States.”

The U.S. Government’s campaign to blame North Korea actually began two days earlier, when The New York Times – as usual – corruptly granted anonymity to “senior administration officials” to disseminate their inflammatory claims with no accountability. These hidden “American officials” used the Paper of Record to announce that they “have concluded that North Korea was ‘centrally involved’ in the hacking of Sony Pictures computers.” With virtually no skepticism about the official accusation, reporters David Sanger and Nicole Perlroth deemed the incident a “cyberterrorism attack” and devoted the bulk of the article to examining the retaliatory actions the government could take against the North Koreans.

The same day, The Washington Post granted anonymity to officials in order to print this:

Other than noting in passing, deep down in the story, that North Korea denied responsibility, not a shred of skepticism was included byPost reporters Drew Harwell and Ellen Nakashima. Like the NYT, the Postdevoted most of its discussion to the “retaliation” available to the U.S.


Laura Poitras: "Sé que estaré bajo el radar de las agencias de inteligencia de todo el mundo"

Laura Poitras: “Sé que estaré bajo el radar de las agencias de inteligencia de todo el mundo”.

La documentalista que ayudó a Snowden presenta su documental en Europa, ‘Citizenfour’, donde muestra cómo fue la preparación de la mayor filtración de la historia

“Snowden no está cooperando o trabajando para ninguna otra agencia de inteligencia, eso es simplemente una historia creada por el Gobierno”, asegura la periodista, elegida por el propio extrabajador de la NSA para hacer pública su filtración

“Lo que Glenn y yo publicamos ahora con Snowden cuestiona directamente el liderazgo de Obama”

 

 

Laura Poitras, documentalista que ayudó a Edward Snowden. Foto cedida por su agente (PRAXIS FILMS)

Laura Poitras, documentalista que ayudó a Edward Snowden. Foto cedida por su agente (PRAXIS FILMS)

 

 

A estas alturas de la película, ¿quién no sabe quién es Edward Snowden? Su denuncia sobre los sistemas de espionaje masivo e indiscriminado utilizados por la Agencia de Seguridad Nacional de Estados Unidos (NSA) contra gobiernos, corporaciones y hasta sus propios ciudadanos ha pasado ya a la historia como la mayor filtración de un trabajador de los servicios de inteligencia jamás publicada. Y si a alguien hemos de dar gracias por ello –además de al joven informático– es a Laura Poitras, documentalista estadounidense afincada en Berlín, a quien Citizenfour eligió para hacer pública su historia “sin importar lo que le pasara a él”. Ella, arriesgando también su vida, así lo hizo.