Top-Secret NSA Report Details Russian Hacking Effort Days Before 2016 Election

While the document provides a rare window into the NSA’s understanding of the mechanics of Russian hacking, it does not show the underlying “raw” intelligence on which the analysis is based. A U.S. intelligence officer who declined to be identified cautioned against drawing too big a conclusion from the document because a single analysis is not necessarily definitive.

Fuente: Top-Secret NSA Report Details Russian Hacking Effort Days Before 2016 Election


The hacking is 21st-century, but US-Russia relations are stuck in the past | Simon Jenkins | Opinion | The Guardian

While Moscow’s cyberwar capacity is cutting-edge, the flurry of expulsions and misguided sanctions simply rehash the mistakes of the cold war

Fuente: The hacking is 21st-century, but US-Russia relations are stuck in the past | Simon Jenkins | Opinion | The Guardian


En qué consisten las sanciones aprobadas por EE.UU. contra Rusia por los ciberataques ocurridos durante la campaña electoral – El Mostrador

La Casa Blanca aprobó severas medidas para castigar a Moscú por sus supuestos intentos de influir en las elecciones presidenciales de noviembre pasado. Donald Trump dijo que el país debe “ocuparse de cosas más grandes y mejores”, aunque anunció que se reunirá la próxima semana con los jefes de inteligencia para informarse sobre el caso.

Fuente: En qué consisten las sanciones aprobadas por EE.UU. contra Rusia por los ciberataques ocurridos durante la campaña electoral – El Mostrador


FBI probes possible China military involvement in cyber attack – FT.com

FBI probes possible China military involvement in cyber attack – FT.com.

hacking hackers chinese registry.com©Dreamstime

The FBI is investigating possible Chinese military involvement in a cyber hack at Register.com, which manages more than 1.4m website addresses for businesses around the world.

Hackers, who appear to have stolen network and employee passwords, have accessed Register’s network for about a year, said people familiar with the probe. But the breach, which the company reported to the FBI but not to customers or investors, is not known to have caused disruptions or resulted in any theft of client data.

Although the investigative trail has pointed to Chinese military involvement, it is unclear what China would want to accomplish by hacking the site. Some current and former law enforcement officials said, however, that the hack could be aimed at obtaining the ability to undermine large parts of internet infrastructure.That has bolstered investigators’ belief that the hackers are state-sponsored rather than criminals intent on making money from credit card data or social security information.

 


Western Spy Agencies Secretly Rely on Hackers for Intel and Expertise – The Intercept

Western Spy Agencies Secretly Rely on Hackers for Intel and Expertise – The Intercept.

Featured photo - Western Spy Agencies Secretly Rely on Hackers for Intel and Expertise

The U.S., U.K. and Canadian governments characterize hackers as a criminal menace, warn of the threats they allegedly pose to critical infrastructure, and aggressively prosecute them, but they are also secretly exploiting their information and expertise, according to top secret documents.

In some cases, the surveillance agencies are obtaining the content of emails by monitoring hackers as they breach email accounts, often without notifying the hacking victims of these breaches. “Hackers are stealing the emails of some of our targets… by collecting the hackers’ ‘take,’ we . . .  get access to the emails themselves,” reads one top secret 2010 National Security Agency document.

These and other revelations about the intelligence agencies’ reliance on hackers are contained in documents provided by whistleblower Edward Snowden. The documents—which come from the U.K. Government Communications Headquarters agency and NSA—shed new light on the various means used by intelligence agencies to exploit hackers’ successes and learn from their skills, while also raising questions about whether governments have overstated the threat posed by some hackers.

By looking out for hacking conducted “both by state-sponsored and freelance hackers” and riding on the coattails of hackers, Western intelligence agencies have gathered what they regard as valuable content:

Recently, Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC) and Menwith Hill Station (MHS) discovered and began exploiting a target-rich data set being stolen by hackers. The hackers’ sophisticated email-stealing intrusion set is known as INTOLERANT. Of the traffic observed, nearly half contains category hits because the attackers are targeting email accounts of interest to the Intelligence Community. Although a relatively new data source, [Target Offices of Primary Interest] have already written multiple reports based on INTOLERANT collect.

The hackers targeted a wide range of diplomatic corps, human rights and democracy activists and even journalists:

INTOLERANT traffic is very organized. Each event is labeled to identify and categorize victims. Cyber attacks commonly apply descriptors to each victim – it helps herd victims and track which attacks succeed and which fail. Victim categories make INTOLERANT interesting:

A = Indian Diplomatic & Indian Navy
B = Central Asian diplomatic
C = Chinese Human Rights Defenders
D = Tibetan Pro-Democracy Personalities
E = Uighur Activists
F = European Special Rep to Afghanistan and Indian photo-journalism
G = Tibetan Government in Exile

In those cases, the NSA and its partner agencies in the United Kingdom and Canada were unable to determine the identity of the hackers who collected the data, but suspect a state sponsor “based on the level of sophistication and the victim set.”


EE.UU. ‘quebrantó’ las redes informáticas de Corea del Norte en 2010 – El Mostrador

EE.UU. ‘quebrantó’ las redes informáticas de Corea del Norte en 2010 – El Mostrador.

La Agencia de Seguridad Nacional logró romper las barreras informáticas en 2010 y entrar en los sistemas norcoreanos a través de las redes chinas que conectan a este país con el resto del mundo.

eeuucoreadelnorte

Estados Unidos “quebrantó” las redes informáticas de Corea del Norte en 2010 y por eso supo que el país estaba detrás del ataque a Sony Pictures, reportaron The New York Times y Der Spiegel.

Corea del Norte dedicó dos meses a entrar en los sistemas de Sony después de que la empresa anunciara sus planes para producir una comedia sobre el asesinato del líder de este país, titulada “The Interview”.

La Agencia de Seguridad Nacional logró romper las barreras informáticas en 2010 y entrar en los sistemas norcoreanos a través de las redes chinas que conectan a este país con el resto del mundo.

Corea del Norte ha negado repetidamente su responsabilidad en el ciberataque contra Sony.


NSA Played Key Role Linking North Korea to Sony Hack – The Intercept

NSA Played Key Role Linking North Korea to Sony Hack – The Intercept.

Featured photo - NSA Played Key Role Linking North Korea to Sony Hack

National Security Agency data and technical analysis assisted in the U.S. government’s attribution of the Sony cyber attack to North Korea, Admiral Michael Rogers said on Thursday.

“We partner with the Department of Homeland Security and FBI in various areas and this is one such area,” Rogers, the NSA director, said in response to a question from a reporter with The Daily Beast about the agency’s role, if any, in the attribution of the Sony attack to North Korea.


North Korea responds with fury to US sanctions over Sony hack | World news | The Guardian

North Korea responds with fury to US sanctions over Sony hack | World news | The Guardian.


Pyongyang denies involvement in Sony Pictures hack and accuses US of stirring up hostility

Obama and Kim
The US president, Barack Obama, and North Korean leader, Kim Jong-un. Photograph: Michael Nelson/KCNA/EPA

North Korea has furiously denounced the United States for imposing sanctions in retaliation for the Pyongyang regime’s alleged cyber-attack on Sony Pictures.

North Korea’s foreign ministry reiterated that it did not have any role in the breach of tens of thousands of confidential Sony emails and business files and accused the US of “groundlessly” stirring up hostility towards Pyongyang. He said the new sanctions would not weaken the country’s 1.2 million-strong military.

“The policy persistently pursued by the US to stifle the DPRK [North Korea], groundlessly stirring up bad blood towards it, will only harden its will and resolution to defend the sovereignty of the country,” North’s state-run KCNA news agency quoted the unnamed spokesman as saying on Sunday.

On Friday, the US sanctioned 10 North Korean government officials and three organisations, including Pyongyang’s primary intelligence agency and state-run arms dealer, in what the White House described as an opening move in the response towards the Sony cyber-attack. It was the first time the US has imposed sanctions on another nation in direct retaliation for hacking an American company. Barack Obama also warned that the US was considering whether to put the authoritarian regime back on its list of state sponsors of terrorism.

North Korea expressed fury over The Interview, a Sony comedy about a fictional CIA plot to kill Kim Jong-un, slamming it as an “act of terror”. It denied hacking Sony, but called the act a “righteous deed”.

There have been doubts in the cyber community about the extent of North Korea’s involvement in the hacking. Many experts have said it is possible that hackers or even Sony insiders could be the culprits, and questioned how the FBI could point the finger so conclusively.

Pyongyang has demanded a joint investigation into the attack and claimed US rejection of the proposal was proof of its guilty conscience and that it was seeking a pretext for further isolating North Korea.


Obama autoriza sanciones a Corea del Norte tras el ciberataque a Sony | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Obama autoriza sanciones a Corea del Norte tras el ciberataque a Sony | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

Un canal de Corea del Sur emite una noticia sobre Sony. / AHN YOUNG-JOON (AP)

El presidente de Estados Unidos, Barack Obama, ha dado este viernes su autorización para aumentar las sanciones contra el régimen de Corea del Norte. Según ha explicado la Casa Blanca, la medida es una respuesta a las “continuadas acciones y políticas provocadoras, desestabilizadoras y represivas” de Pyongyang. Especialmente, ha subrayado, por el “ciberataque coercitivo y destructivo contra Sony Pictures” tras la producción de la película La Entrevista.

Esta comedia sobre dos periodistas reclutados por la CIA para asesinar al líder norcoreano, Kim Jong-un, desató las iras y amenazas de Corea del Norte el mes pasado, hasta el punto de que Sony llegó a cancelar su estreno en cartelera, previsto el día de Navidad. Finalmente, tras fuertes críticas por el paso atrás, incluso de Obama, la cinta fue exhibida en varios centenares de cine independientes y a través de plataformas digitales de pago, en lo que fue descrito en EE UU como una manera de defender la libertad de expresión.

Aunque algunos especialistas en informática han puesto en duda la versión oficial, el Gobierno de Obama y el FBI insisten en señalar a Pyongyang como el responsable del ataque informático contra Sony a finales de noviembre. Una posición reiterada este viernes por altos funcionarios del Gobierno al desgranar las sanciones autorizadas por Obama, quien reafirma de esta manera también su señalamiento hacia Corea del Norte.

“Mientras el FBI continúa su investigación sobre el ciberataque, estas nuevas medidas dejan claro que haremos uso de un amplio abanico de herramientas para defender los negocios estadounidenses y a sus ciudadanos, y para responder a los intentos de minar nuestros valores o de amenazar la seguridad nacional de EE UU”, ha declarado por su parte el secretario del Tesoro, Jacob Lew.

Su departamento es el encargado de aplicar las nuevas sanciones, que afectan a tres empresas norcoreanas y a diez altos funcionarios del régimen de Kim y responsables de las entidades afectadas. Su designación bloquea cualquier activo de los afectados en territorio estadounidense y les deniega también otro tipo de acceso al sistema financiero norteamericano. Además, prohíbe a cualquier empresa o ciudadano de EE UU realizar cualquier tipo de transacción con los sancionados.


North Korea/Sony Story Shows How Eagerly U.S. Media Still Regurgitate Government Claims – The Intercept

North Korea/Sony Story Shows How Eagerly U.S. Media Still Regurgitate Government Claims – The Intercept.

BY GLENN GREENWALD 

Featured photo - North Korea/Sony Story Shows How Eagerly U.S. Media Still Regurgitate Government Claims

The identity of the Sony hackers is still unknown. President Obama, in a December 19 press conference, announced: “We can confirm that North Korea engaged in this attack.” He then vowed: “We will respond. . . . We cannot have a society in which some dictator some place can start imposing censorship here in the United States.”

The U.S. Government’s campaign to blame North Korea actually began two days earlier, when The New York Times – as usual – corruptly granted anonymity to “senior administration officials” to disseminate their inflammatory claims with no accountability. These hidden “American officials” used the Paper of Record to announce that they “have concluded that North Korea was ‘centrally involved’ in the hacking of Sony Pictures computers.” With virtually no skepticism about the official accusation, reporters David Sanger and Nicole Perlroth deemed the incident a “cyberterrorism attack” and devoted the bulk of the article to examining the retaliatory actions the government could take against the North Koreans.

The same day, The Washington Post granted anonymity to officials in order to print this:

Other than noting in passing, deep down in the story, that North Korea denied responsibility, not a shred of skepticism was included byPost reporters Drew Harwell and Ellen Nakashima. Like the NYT, the Postdevoted most of its discussion to the “retaliation” available to the U.S.


Sony hack: sacked employees could be to blame, researchers claim | Film | The Guardian

Sony hack: sacked employees could be to blame, researchers claim | Film | The Guardian.

Sony cancelled the release of the Interview in major cinemas, believing it had been hacked by North Korea in retaliation for the film’s depiction of its leader Kim Jong-un being assasinated Photograph: Veronique Dupont/Getty

Security experts investigating the devastating hack against Sony Pictures appear to be moving away from the theory that the attack was a carried out by North Korea, focusing instead on disgruntled former employees of the firm.

Researchers at Norse cybersecurity claim that six former employees could have compromised the company’s networks, arguing that accessing and navigating selective information would take a detailed knowledge of Sony’s systems.

Norse is not part of the official FBI investigation, but did brief the government on Monday, the company said. Though noting that the findings are “hardly conclusive”, Norse senior vice president Kurt Stammberger told the Security Ledger that nine researchers had begun to explore the theory that an insider with motive against Sony would be best placed to execute a hack.

“The FBI points to reused code from previous attacks associated with North Korea, as well as similarities in the networks used to launch the attacks,” said writer Bruce Schneier. “This sort of evidence is circumstantial at best. It’s easy to fake, and it’s even easier to interpret it wrong. In general, it’s a situation that rapidly devolves into storytelling, where analysts pick bits and pieces of the ‘evidence’ to suit the narrative they already have worked out in their heads.”

 

Schneier also said that diplomatically, it may suit the US government to be “overconfident in assigning blame for the attack” to try and discourage future attacks by nation states.

 

He also pointed to comments by Harvard law professor Jonathan Zittrain, who said Sony might be encouraged to present the hack as an act or terrorism to help fend of likely lawsuits from current and former employees damaged by leaked material.

“If Sony can characterize this as direct interference by or at the behest of a nation-state, might that somehow earn them the kind of immunity from liability that you might see other companies getting when there’s physical terrorism involved, sponsored by a state?” Zittrain told AP.


Las dudas sobre el papel de Corea del Norte en el caso de piratería contra Sony – BioBioChile

Las dudas sobre el papel de Corea del Norte en el caso de piratería contra Sony – BioBioChile.

 

ARCHIVO | Global Panorama (CC) | FlickrARCHIVO | Global Panorama (CC) | Flickr

Publicado por Claudia Miño | La Información es de Agencia AFP
 

Para Barack Obama no hay duda alguna: Corea del Norte y su líder Kim Jong-Un están detrás del acto de piratería de que fue objeto el estudio Sony Pictures. Pero según expertos, el caso no es tan simple.

El régimen comunista niega estar implicado en una operación durante la cual fueron robados los datos personales de 47.000 empleados y colaboradores de Sony, pero ha elogiado a sus autores.

El incidente, revelado el 24 de noviembre, fue reivindicado por el grupo de piratas Guardianes de la Paz (GOP, por sus iniciales en inglés), que exigió a Sony anular el estreno de “The Interview” (La entrevista), una sátira en la que dos periodistas son contactados por la CIA para asesinar a Kim Jong-Un.

El presidente de Estados Unidos no dudó en culpar a Pyongyang y dijo que su país respondería al ataque.

Sin embargo, especialistas en seguridad informática estiman que las pistas que apuntan hacia Corea del Norte pueden ser en este caso muy frágiles.

“Esta afirmación me deja escéptico y estaría aún más sorprendido de que Corea del Norte haya sido capaz de llevar a cabo (el ataque) sola, sin ayuda”, comentó John Dickson, de la empresa Denim Group.

“No hay duda de que (los norcoreanos) tienen ganas de golpearnos, pero no disponen de los recursos que tienen otros estados” y que les permitirían lanzar un ciberataque de esta envergadura, declaró a la AFP.

“En realidad, no sabemos nada”, dijo por su lado Bruce Schneier, de Co3 Systems, una firma especializada en seguridad informática.


FBI warned Year Ago of impending Malware Attacks—But Didn’t Share Info with Sony – The Intercept

FBI warned Year Ago of impending Malware Attacks—But Didn’t Share Info with Sony – The Intercept.

BY JANA WINTER 

Featured photo - FBI warned Year Ago of impending Malware Attacks—But Didn’t Share Info with Sony

Nearly one year before Sony was hacked, the FBI warned that U.S. companies were facing potentially crippling data destruction malware attacks, and predicted that such a hack could cause irreparable harm to a firm’s reputation, or even spell the end of the company entirely.  The FBI also detailed specific guidance for U.S. companies to follow to prepare and plan for such an attack.

But the FBI never sent Sony the report.

The Dec. 13, 2013 FBI Intelligence Assessment, “Potential Impacts of a Data-Destruction Malware Attack on a U.S. Critical Infrastructure Company’s Network,” warned that companies “must become prepared for the increasing possibility they could become victim to a data destruction cyber attack.”

The 16-page report includes details on previous malware attacks on South Korea banking and media companies—the same incidents and characteristics the FBI said Dec. 19th that it had used to conclude that North Korea was behind the Sony attack.

The report, a copy of which was obtained by The Intercept, was based on discussions with private industry representatives and was prepared after the 2012 cyber attack on Saudi Aramco.  The report was marked For Official Use Only, and has not been previously released.

In it, the FBI warned, “In the current cyber climate, the FBI speculates it is not a question of if a U.S. company will experience an attempted data-destruction attack, but when and which company will fall victim.”


Corea del Norte sufre misterioso “ciberapagón” en plena polémica con EE.UU. – El Mostrador

Corea del Norte sufre misterioso “ciberapagón” en plena polémica con EE.UU. – El Mostrador.

Aunque no es la primera vez que esto ocurre, el fenómeno despertó una fuerte atención y todas las miradas se dirigieron al país norteamericano, ya que el pasado viernes el presidente Barack Obama prometió una “respuesta proporcionada” al reciente ciberataque a Sony Pictures del que culpa a la nación asiática.

Corea-del-Norte-pc

Corea del Norte sufrió un largo apagón en su red de internet, un misterioso suceso que ha desatado especulaciones en pleno conflicto con EE.UU. por el ciberataque que llevó a la cancelación de una película que caricaturiza al líder Kim Jong-un.

Las principales páginas web norcoreanas, entre ellas la de la agencia estatal de noticias KCNA y la del diario Rodong del Partido de los Trabajadores, permanecieron caídas de forma discontinua desde la 01.00 hora local (16.00 GMT del lunes) hasta las 10.45 (01.45 GMT) de este martes.

Aunque no es la primera vez que esto ocurre, el fenómeno despertó una fuerte atención y todas las miradas se dirigieron a EE.UU., ya que el pasado viernes el presidente Barack Obama prometió una “respuesta proporcionada” al reciente ciberataque a Sony Pictures del que culpa a Corea del Norte.

Algunos medios surcoreanos han sugerido que EEUU podría estar detrás del suceso ya que, aunque las caídas de las páginas web norcoreanas son relativamente frecuentes, no es tan habitual que el apagón afecte a todas a la vez.

“Estamos analizando si el motivo de la caída de la red fue un hackeo externo o una prueba del sistema interno para reforzar la seguridad”, explicó una fuente del Gobierno de Corea del Sur a la agencia local Yonhap.

Corea del Norte no se ha pronunciado de momento, mientras otros medios y expertos consideran la posibilidad de que el país comunista pueda haber sufrido un ataque por parte de hackers anónimos u organizaciones civiles.

Como precedente, el pasado agosto la ONG estadounidense Human Rights Foundation inició una campaña de “hackeo” de las redes norcoreanas con informáticos de diversos países para introducir información del exterior en el duramente restringido ciberespacio de uno de los países más aislados del mundo.


Enough with the Sony hack. Can we all calm down about cyberwar with North Korea already? | Trevor Timm | Comment is free | theguardian.com

Enough with the Sony hack. Can we all calm down about cyberwar with North Korea already? | Trevor Timm | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

Yes, the Interview was just a Seth Rogen stoner movie – and, no, privacy, free speech and World War III are not at stake

the interview movie poster
“We will respond proportionally,” Obama said on Friday. Why should the US be responding offensively at all? Photograph: Sony Pictures

The sanest thing anyone said in Washington this week was a reminder, on the Friday before Christmas, when Barack Obama took a break from oscillating between reassuring rationality and understated fear to make an accidental joke:

It says something about North Korea that it decided to mount an all-out attack about a satirical movie … starring Seth Rogen.

It also says something about the over-the-top rhetoric of United States cybersecurity paranoia that it took the President of the United States to remind us to take a deep breath and exhale, even if Sony abruptly scrapped its poorly reviewed Hollywood blockbuster after nebulous threats from alleged North Korean hackers.

Unfortunately, acting rational seems out of the question at this point. In between making a lot of sense about Sony’s cowardly “mistake” to pull a film based on a childish, unsubstantiated threat, Obama indicated the US planned to respond in some as-yet-unknown way, which sounds a lot like a cyberattack of our own.

“We will respond, we will respond proportionally, and in a place and time that we choose,” Obama said at his year-end news conference. Why should we be responding offensively at all? As the Wall Street Journal’s Danny Yadron reported, a movie studio doesn’t reach the US government’s definition of “critical infrastructure” that would allow its military to respond under existing rules, but that didn’t stop the White House from calling the Sony hack a “national security issue” just a day later.

Let’s put aside for a moment that many security experts haven’t exactly been rushing to agree with the FBI’s cut-and-dry conclusion that “the North Korean government is responsible” for the hack. Wired’s Kim Zetter wrote a detailed analysis about why the evidence accusing North Korea is really flimsy, while other security professionals have weighed in with similar research.

But whoever the hackers are, can we stop calling them “cyber-terrorists,”like Motion Picture Association of America chairman Chris Dodd did on Friday? They may be sadistic pranksters, extortionists and assholes, but anonymously posting a juvenile and vague word jumble incorporating “9/11” that has no connection to reality does not make them terrorist masterminds. That’s giving whoever did it way too much credit.


EE UU cree que Corea del Norte está detrás del ataque a Sony | Cultura | EL PAÍS

EE UU cree que Corea del Norte está detrás del ataque a Sony | Cultura | EL PAÍS.


Kim Jong-un, en una ceremonia por el tercer aniversario de la muerte de su padre, el miércoles. / JUNG YEON-JE (AFP)

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Estados Unidos ha conseguido finalmente encontrar la conexión entre Corea del Norte y el masivo ataque informático que atenaza a la multinacional Sony Pictures desde hace tres semanas. Fuentes anónimas del FBI citadas por The New York Times, CNN y Associated Press confirmaron por primera vez que Pyongyang está detrás de la brutal represalia contra la compañía por la película La entrevista, una parodia sobre un intento de asesinato del presidente norcoreano, Kin Jong-un.

Los medios estadounidenses afirman que los investigadores harán un anuncio al respecto este jueves. Un portavoz del Consejo de Seguridad Nacional dijo el miércoles por a noche que “el Gobierno de Estados Unidos ha ofrecido a Sony Pictures Entertainment apoyo y asistencia en respuesta al ataque. El FBI lleva la iniciativa en la investigación. EE UU está investigando la autoría y dará información en el momento apropiado”. El organismo afirma que la Casa Blanca “trabaja sin descanso para llevar a los autores de este ataque ante la justicia” y está “considerando varias opciones” de respuesta.


Cines ceden ante amenazas de hackers y suspenden estreno de película sobre Corea del Norte – El Mostrador

Cines ceden ante amenazas de hackers y suspenden estreno de película sobre Corea del Norte – El Mostrador.

En las últimas semanas, se ha especulado con la posibilidad de que Pyonyang esté detrás del hackeo a Sony, ya que hace unos meses el gobierno norcoreano calificó a “The Interview” como “un acto de guerra”.

El estreno de “The Interview” en Nueva York, previsto para el próximo 25 de diciembre, fue suspendido ante el temor generado por las amenazas de ataques contra las salas.

Otros cines de Estados Unidos también decidieron no proyectar ese título para evitar posibles represalias.

Los piratas informáticos detrás del hackeo del mes pasado contra el estudio Sony Pictures, hiceron público este martes un mensaje en el que hacían referencia a los atentados del 11 de septiembre de 2001 y amenazaban con llevar a cabo acciones similares en las salas que exhibieran la película.

La cinta producida por Sony Pictures es una parodia al régimen de Corea del Norte y en ella sus protagonistas -Seth Rogen y James Franco- diseñan un plan para asesinar al líder norcoreano Kim Jong-Un.

En las últimas semanas, se ha especulado con la posibilidad de que Pyonyang esté detrás del hackeo a Sony, ya que hace unos meses el gobierno norcoreano calificó a “The Interview” como “un acto de guerra”.

“Les mostraremos claramente en el momento y en el los lugares en los que se exhiba ‘The Interview’, incluyendo el estreno, el destino amargo al que estarán condenados aquellos que buscan diversión en el terror”, se puede leer en el mensaje que los hackers enviaron en las últimas horas a los medios en Estados Unidos.

“El mundo estará lleno de miedo. Recuerden el 11 de septiembre de 2001. Les recomendamos que se mantengan alejados en ese momento de esos lugares (si su casa está cerca mejor váyanse). Todo lo que suceda en los próximos días es resultado de la avaricia de Sony Pictures Entertainment”, aseguran los piratas que se identifican bajo las siglas de GOP (Guardians of Peace).

Esta es la primera vez que GOP nombra la película “The Interview” en uno de sus mensajes.


Corea del Norte se declara inocente de piratería informática contra Sony Pictures – BioBioChile

Corea del Norte se declara inocente de piratería informática contra Sony Pictures – BioBioChile.

 

Global Panorama (CC) FlickrGlobal Panorama (CC) Flickr

Publicado por Catalina Díaz | La Información es de Agencia AFP
 

Corea del Norte negó este domingo cualquier responsabilidad en el ataque informático masivo contra Sony Pictures, que reveló información confidencial de unas 47.000 personas, entre las cuales figuran algunas personalidades.

La Comisión de defensa nacional norcoreana denunció los “falsos rumores” implicando a Pyongyang en el ataque contra Sony, aunque lo calificó de “acto legítimo”.


Forget North Korea – the real rogue cyber operator lies much closer to home | Technology | The Guardian

Forget North Korea – the real rogue cyber operator lies much closer to home | Technology | The Guardian.

North Korea

 North Korea was implicated in a cyber-attack on Sony Pictures, but the real story of the past two weeks involved further revelations about the spying methods used by GCHQ and the NSA. Photograph: Kim Jae-Hwan/AFP/Getty Images

Were you to measure significance in column inches, the massive cyber-attack on Sony Pictures would appear to be the story of the week.Company executives had to post notices on office entrances telling staff not to log into the network when they reached their desks. The company’s entire network had to be taken offline as it grappled with a ransom demand that threatened to release confidential documents and not-yet-released films unless money changed hands.

The big question was: who was responsible for the attack? Fevered speculation led some people to point the finger at North Korea, on the grounds that one of the forthcoming films, The Interview, poked fun at the country’s leader, Kim Jong-un. This seemed implausible to this columnist: North Korea may be distinctly humourless on the subject of its beloved leader, but seeking a ransom would be uncool even for that nauseating regime.

In the event, no money seems to have changed hands: some confidential documents, eg spreadsheets giving salaries of top Sony executives,made their way online and the embargoed movies began to pop up on piracy sites.

Exciting stuff, eh? But the really big cyber story of the past two weeks is less glamorous but rather more worrying in the longer term. It concerns Regin, a piece of malware that has only recently come to light, although it’s been around for years. The security firm Symantec describes it as “a complex piece of malware whose structure displays a degree of technical competence rarely seen. Customisable with an extensive range of capabilities depending on the target, it provides its controllers with a powerful framework for mass surveillance and has been used in spying operations against government organisations, infrastructure operators, businesses, researchers and private individuals.”

The company goes on to speculate that developing Regin took “months, if not years” and concludes that “capabilities and the level of resources behind Regin indicate that it is one of the main cyberespionage tools used by a nation state”.


Investigado un general retirado de EE UU por filtraciones sobre un ciberataque

http://internacional.elpais.com/internacional/2013/06/28/actualidad/1372409720_205941.html

James Cartwright fue subjefe del Estado Mayor Conjunto hasta 2011

Es sospechoso de haber filtrado información sobre los ciberataques al programa nuclear iraní

James E. Cartwright, en 2011. / Pablo Martinez Monsivais (AP)

Un general retirado y ex segundo al mando del Estado Mayor Conjunto de EEUU está siendo investigado por la filtración de información clasificada sobre un ciberataque al programa nuclear de Irán, según informa la cadena NBC.