The U.S. Has Ramped Up Airstrikes Against ISIS in Raqqa, and Syrian Civilians Are Paying the Price

Thanks to camera phones and social media, the deadly consequences of U.S. military operations are indeed being recorded, shared, and watched around the world on an unprecedented scale. But while civilian deaths are regularly reported in local media outlets in the Middle East, they are seldom reported in detail by international media.

Fuente: The U.S. Has Ramped Up Airstrikes Against ISIS in Raqqa, and Syrian Civilians Are Paying the Price


WashPost Is Richly Rewarded for False News About Russia Threat While Public Is Deceived

The most ironic aspect of all this is that it is mainstream journalists — the very people who have become obsessed with the crusade against Fake News — who play the key role in enabling and fueling this dissemination of false stories. They do so not only by uncritically spreading them, but also by taking little or no steps to notify the public of their falsity.

Fuente: WashPost Is Richly Rewarded for False News About Russia Threat While Public Is Deceived


Russia Hysteria Infects WashPost Again: False Story About Hacking U.S. Electric Grid

Those interested in a sober and rational discussion of the Russia hacking issue should read the following:(1) Three posts by cybersecurity expert Jeffrey Carr: first, on the difficulty of proving attribution for any hacks; second, on the irrational claims on which the “Russia hacked the DNC” case is predicated; and third, on the woefully inadequate, evidence-free report issued by the Department of Homeland Security and FBI this week to justify sanctions against Russia.(2) Yesterday’s Rolling Stone article by Matt Taibbi, who lived and worked for more than a decade in Russia, titled: “Something About This Russia Story Stinks.”(3) An Atlantic article by David A. Graham on the politics and strategies of the sanctions imposed this week on Russia by Obama; I disagree with several of his claims, but the article is a rarity: a calm, sober, rational assessment of this debate.

Fuente: Russia Hysteria Infects WashPost Again: False Story About Hacking U.S. Electric Grid


The Guardian’s Summary of Julian Assange’s Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False

one’s views of Assange are completely irrelevant to this article, which is not about Assange. This article, instead, is about a report published this week by The Guardian that recklessly attributed to Assange comments that he did not make. This article is about how those false claims — fabrications, really — were spread all over the internet by journalists, causing hundreds of thousands of people (if not millions) to consume false news. The purpose of this article is to underscore, yet again, that those who most flamboyantly denounce Fake News, and want Facebook and other tech giants to suppress content in the name of combating it, are often the most aggressive and self-serving perpetrators of it.

Fuente: The Guardian’s Summary of Julian Assange’s Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False


La corrupción y la caída final de los Clinton – El Mostrador

Y pese a que la prensa mayoritaria lo negaba en forma maniaca, los correos filtrados por Wikileaks eran viralizados por las redes sociales, dando cuenta de una serie de situaciones como las siguientes: cerca de la mitad de las personas que lograron tener acceso a Hillary Clinton mientras era Secretaria de Estado, habían hecho, en los días previos, importantes donaciones a la Fundación Clinton (pay to play); su jefe de campaña era al mismo tiempo lobbista de los gobiernos de Arabia Saudita y Qatar (acusados de ser financistas de ISIS), para los cuales consiguió millonarias ventas de armas (durante el periodo en que Clinton fue Secretaria de Estado las exportaciones de armas duplicaron a las realizadas en tiempos de Bush).

Fuente: La corrupción y la caída final de los Clinton – El Mostrador


Social media alone understood the Donald Trump story

That which US journalism proclaims as its most precious contribution to a democratic polity, that it finds and publishes the facts, shorn of bias, was absent this week. Neither the journalism of facts nor the algorithms of the polling organisations could grasp the popular swell of affection for a candidate that nearly all mainstream media found irredeemably flawed — perhaps because he was flawed.The media that do get it are those that carry emotion: social media above all others.

Fuente: Social media alone understood the Donald Trump story


California single mother faces jail time for selling homemade food on Facebook | US news | The Guardian

The Facebook group, which she doesn’t use any more, was designed to build community, Ruelas added.“It helped a lot of people in a lot of ways. The purpose wasn’t to get rich.”

Fuente: California single mother faces jail time for selling homemade food on Facebook | US news | The Guardian


In the Democratic Echo Chamber, Inconvenient Truths Are Recast as Putin Plots

To see how extreme and damaging this behavior has become, let’s just quickly examine two utterly false claims that Democrats over the past four days — led by party-loyal journalists — have disseminated and induced thousands of people, if not more, to believe.

Fuente: In the Democratic Echo Chamber, Inconvenient Truths Are Recast as Putin Plots


It might be trending, but that doesn’t make it true | John Naughton | Opinion | The Guardian

As the fallout from the first US presidential debate showed, taking social media at face value is foolhardy

Fuente: It might be trending, but that doesn’t make it true | John Naughton | Opinion | The Guardian


Democrats stream gun control sit-in on Periscope after Republicans turn TV cameras off | US news | The Guardian

Nicky Woolf in San Francisco@nickywoolfThursday 23 June 2016 07.32 BSTLast modified on Thursday 23 June 2016 08.28 BST Share on LinkedIn Share on Google+Shares1,259Comments274Save for laterLawmakers turned to Periscope and Facebook Live to broadcast a sit-in protest in the House of Representatives on Wednesday after the Speaker’s office switched off the TV cameras inside the chamber.

Fuente: Democrats stream gun control sit-in on Periscope after Republicans turn TV cameras off | US news | The Guardian


Facebook, Snapchat and Twitter must play by tough rules for kids – FT.com

“Can I download Snapchat, Mum?” A conversation like this will play out in households with teenage children who use the messaging app across the EU when new rules requiring social networks to get parental consent from all users under the age of 16

Fuente: Facebook, Snapchat and Twitter must play by tough rules for kids – FT.com


The CIA Is Investing in Firms That Mine Your Tweets and Instagram Photos

SOFT ROBOTS THAT can grasp delicate objects, computer algorithms designed to spot an “insider threat,” and artificial intelligence that will sift through large data sets — these are just a few of the technologies being pursued by companies with investment from In-Q-Tel, the CIA’s venture capital firm, according to a document obtained by The Intercept.

Fuente: The CIA Is Investing in Firms That Mine Your Tweets and Instagram Photos


The new way police are surveilling you: Calculating your threat ‘score’ – The Washington Post

Some local police departments scan social media, send drones aloft and monitor surveillance cameras.

Fuente: The new way police are surveilling you: Calculating your threat ‘score’ – The Washington Post


Is the online surveillance of black teenagers the new stop-and-frisk? | US news | The Guardian

Is the online surveillance of black teenagers the new stop-and-frisk? | US news | The Guardian.

police gangs surveillance Stop-and-frisk was found unconstitutional in 2013. Illustration: Rob Dobi

Taylonn Murphy is sitting in a Harlem beauty salon after hours. Leaning back in his chair and with a calm demeanor, he is talking about keeping young local people out of harm’s way.

Every now and then though, as he speaks, his voice breaks.

In September 2011, his daughter Tayshana, 18, a local basketball superstar and resident of West Harlem’s Grant Houses, was shot dead by two residents of Manhattanville Houses. The killing was described as the result of a rivalry between the two housing projects that dates back decades.

Almost three years after his daughter’s death, on 4 June 2014, helicopters hovered overhead as the first rays of sunlight hit the concrete. At least 400 New York police officers in military gear raided both housing projects, with indictments for the arrest of 103 people.

Starting in January 2010, the community’s children and young adults had been closely watched by police officers – both online and off. The investigation had involved listening in to 40,000 calls from correctional facilities, watching hours of surveillance video, and reviewing over 1m online social media pages.

For Murphy, the revelation of these details was choking: the NYPD had been attentively surveilling both communities for over one and a half years before his daughter was murdered, patiently waiting and observing as the rivalry between crew members escalated.

Online surveillance: the new stop-and-frisk?

In 2013, stop-and-frisk was found unconstitutional by a federal judge for its use of racial profiling. Since then, logged instances have dropped from an astonishing 685,000 in 2011 to just 46,000 in 2014. But celebrations may be premature, with local policing increasingly moving off the streets and migrating online.

In 2012, the NYPD declared a war on gangs across the city with Operation Crew Cut. The linchpin of the operation’s activities is the sweeping online surveillance of individuals as young as 10 years old deemed to be members of crews and gangs.

This move is being criticized by an increasing number of community members and legal scholars, who see it as an insidious way of justifying the monitoring of young men and boys of color in low-income communities.


EE UU ‘torpedea’ la propaganda yihadista | Internacional | EL PAÍS

EE UU ‘torpedea’ la propaganda yihadista | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

Washington lanza un vídeo a través de su campaña en el que muestra las atrocidades del EI

Fotograma del vídeo de EE UU sobre las atrocidades del EI

El campo de batalla es Twitter. Ahí, la actividad del Departamento de Estado estadounidense es frenética. Y tiene pocas cortapisas. En uno de sus 17 tuits publicados el viernes con el hashtag (hilo de comunicación de esta red) #thinkagainturnaway, la sección de comunicación y contraterrorismo informa de que ya hay combatientes sirios que dicen no al Estado Islámico (EI) porque “asesinan a musulmanes”. La foto que acompaña muestra a un yihadista descargando su rifle contra hombres no uniformados.

Think again turn away (Piénsalo de nuevo y date la vuelta) es el nombre de la campaña lanzada hace un año por esta sección de contraterrorismo, dirigida por el exdiplomático de origen cubano Alberto Fernández, y que este fin de semana ha sacudido las redes con un vídeo de un minuto en el que con ironía da la bienvenida a los que quieran adentrarse en el califato del EI. Con imágenes sacadas de cintas editadas y publicadas por el aparato de propaganda de los yihadistas, el Departamento de Estado alerta: “Corre, no camines hacia la tierra del EI”.

Tal es la brutalidad del montaje hecho por Washington (voladura de mezquitas, crucifixiones, cabezas cortadas) que YouTube, donde estaba alojado, decidió bloquearlo, como hace con muchas producciones yihadistas.

La guerra en Internet entre yihadistas, servicios de inteligencia y plataformas de contenidos es la guerra del ratón y el gato. Si el perfil de Twitter vinculado al EI @wilaiat_Halab2 es “suspendido”, sólo hace falta cambiar el último número y volver al frente. Según fuentes policiales españolas, esta cuenta, con raíz en Alepo (Siria), está vinculada a la división del EI en Nínive, provincia iraquí con capital en Mosul, bastión de su califato. El actual relevo de este perfil es @wilaiat_Halab5.


James Foley and the daily horrors of the internet: think hard before clicking | James Ball | Comment is free | theguardian.com

James Foley and the daily horrors of the internet: think hard before clicking | James Ball | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

Outcry over footage of Foley’s apparent beheading raises difficult questions about editorial ethics – and our own choices

 

 

James Foley in Syria in 2012
James Foley in 2012. In a statement on his Facebook page, his mother said: ‘We have never been prouder of our son Jim. He gave his life trying to expose the world to the suffering of the Syrian people.’ Photograph: Nicole Tung/AP

 

With depressing frequency in this summer of diverse horrors, we hear tales of desperate human misery, suffering and depravity – and because we live now in an era where virtually every phone is a globally connected camera, we are confronted with graphic evidence of tragedy.

 

The footage of the apparent beheading (to refer to the atrocity as an execution serves only to lend a veneer of dignity to barbarism) of the US photojournalist James Foley at the hands of a British Isis extremist has raised particularly strong feelings.

 

Social networks are banning users who share the footage. Newspapers are facing opprobrium for the choices they make in showing stills or parts of the video. Others, of course, will seek out the video after seeing the row, or else post it around the internet in a juvenile form of the free speech argument.

 

Before considering the rights and wrongs of the position, there is one fact we should face: we are presented with images of grotesque violence on a daily basis. Last month the New York Times ran on its front page the dead and broken body of a Palestinian child.

 

Like Foley, that child was someone’s son, someone’s brother, someone’s friend, and in a connected world there is just as much chance his family saw the photo and its spread as Foley’s will see the latest awful images of their loved one.

 

That photo raised little controversy in comparison to the use of images of Foley. Photos of groups of civilian men massacred by Isis across Iraq and Syria – widely shared on social media and used by publications across the world – caused no outcry whatsoever.

 

It’s hard to look at that and not see a double standard: like many other courageous and talented people, Foley had chosen to travel to the region, and knew the risks that entailed. Others were killed simply fleeing their homes. In a strange and bitter irony, one of the duties of photographers such as Foley is documenting bloodshed in order to show the world.

 

To see an outcry for Foley’s video and not for others is to wonder whether we are disproportionately concerned over showing graphic deaths of white westerners – maybe even white journalists – and not others.


Los planes de Estados Unidos tras ZunZuneo, el ‘twitter cubano’ | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Los planes de Estados Unidos tras ZunZuneo, el ‘twitter cubano’ | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

Washington financió en secreto la creación de una red social en Cuba destinada a provocar un cambio político en la isla, según revela la agencia Associated Press

 

Miami 3 ABR 2014 – 22:36 CET

 

Mujeres conversando en una calle de La Habana. / A. Ernesto (EFE)

 

La red se llamó ZunZuneo: nombre derivado del zumbido de una especie cubana de colibrí llamada zunzún. De acuerdo a una investigación publicada este jueves por la agencia de noticias Associated Press, esta red social de mensajería de texto creada en 2009 – que llegó a contar a 40.000 usuarios en toda Cuba – fue secretamente concebida y financiada por el Gobierno de Estados Unidos con la finalidad de provocar un cambio en la isla a través de la circulación de contenidos políticos que inspiraran a una “primavera cubana”. El proyecto fue gestionado por la Agencia Internacional de Estados Unidos para el Desarrollo (USAID, por sus siglas en inglés) a través de compañías fachada con cuentas bancarias en Islas Caimán y de servidores informáticos ubicados en tres países. Washington niega que se tratara de una operación encubierta.

 

“El plan era desarrollar un ‘Twitter cubano’ elemental, que usara mensajes de texto enviados y recibidos por teléfonos móviles para burlar el férreo control informativo y las restricciones al uso de la internet que mantiene el gobierno de Cuba”, señala el reportaje de AP. En él citan documentos y numerosas entrevistas con personas que participaron en el proyecto, recopiladas por los periodistas Desmond Butler, Jack Gillum y Alberto Arce. En principio, la red sería utilizada para circular “contenido no controversial”, como noticias deportivas o del mundo del espectáculo. Una vez que lograra reunir a una audiencia de cientos de miles de suscriptores – dice el reportaje – “enviarían mensajes de contenido político para inspirar a los cubanos a crear convocatorias en red de concentraciones masivas que fueran convocadas rápidamente. El objetivo era que pudieran desencadenar una “primavera cubana” o, como un documento de USAID lo expresó, “renegociar el equilibro de poder entre el Estado y la sociedad’”.