Trump promulga ley que permite a empresas de internet vender datos de sus usuarios – El Mostrador

La norma, aprobada por la mayoría republicana en el Congreso la semana pasada, revoca un reglamento que los demócratas habían redactado para la Comisión Federal de Comunicaciones.

Fuente: Trump promulga ley que permite a empresas de internet vender datos de sus usuarios – El Mostrador


Cisco Systems to cut 6000 jobs

Cisco Systems to cut 6000 jobs.

Cisco has had to make more adjustments to counter sluggish sales.Cisco has had to make more adjustments to counter sluggish sales. Photo: Albert Gea

In what has become almost an annual ritual, computer networking and communications colossus Cisco Systems on Wednesday said it was laying off thousands of employees as it struggles with sluggish sales and a range of fierce competitors.

The company announced 6000 job cuts on a conference call following its quarterly earnings report, or roughly 8 per cent of its workforce, and has trimmed nearly 20,000 jobs worldwide over the last five years. Although Chief Financial Officer Frank Calderoni said the company expected to reinvest much of the savings from the cuts announced Wednesday into key growth areas, Cisco officials would not say how many new people would be hired in those areas or where they would be employed. They also did not say where the cuts would occur.

A spokeswoman for Cisco Australia said the cuts would have a global impact. It’s understood the company employees around 1000 people in Australia.

Noting that the San Jose corporation needs to make changes to keep pace with rapidly changing technology, Baird Equity Research analyst Jayson Noland said “it’s probably frustrating to be an employee there when they are going to have major restructuring efforts like this every year or two.” But he added, “if your skills are stale as an engineer or as a sales and marketing guy, you’re running the risk of being replaced.”

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Cisco is Silicon Valley’s fifth-biggest corporation by revenue, but its sales have been blunted by the sluggish global economy. It also faces competition from recent start-ups to more established corporations such as Juniper Networks of Sunnyvale and Brocade Communications Systems of San Jose.


U.S. Prepares for Sale of Bitcoins Seized in Its Raid on Silk Road – NYTimes.com

U.S. Prepares for Sale of Bitcoins Seized in Its Raid on Silk Road – NYTimes.com.

Barry Silbert of SecondMarket, who runs a Bitcoin investment fund, will be bidding on the Bitcoin lots in the online auction.Michael Nagle for The New York TimesBarry Silbert of SecondMarket, who runs a Bitcoin investment fund, will be bidding on the Bitcoin lots in the online auction.

Updated, 7:46 p.m. | On its face, it looked like a typical government raid: Federal agents shut down an online drug marketplace, seizing millions of dollars of ill-gotten gains in the process.

But there was just one problem. The money was in Bitcoin. And since last fall, the government has been trying to figure out how it can sell it for the maximum amount.

The federal government is responsible for selling property taken from criminals, including cars, yachts and fine jewelry. But Bitcoin, a computer-driven virtual currency that exists entirely online, is neither fish nor fowl.

If the government dumped all the coins on the open exchanges where Bitcoins are bought and sold, it could significantly depress their price.

So instead, with help from the F.B.I. and federal prosecutors in Manhattan, the United States Marshals Service has arranged an online auction for nearly 30,000 of the Bitcoins it seized from the now-defunct market Silk Road, which federal prosecutors shut in October and have accused of aiding the sale of cocaine, ecstasy and other illegal goods and services.


Los gigantes tecnológicos pagan el precio por el caso Snowden

Los gigantes tecnológicos pagan el precio por el caso Snowden.

Un año después de las revelaciones del extécnico de la NSA Edward Snowden, grandes empresas como Microsoft, IBM o Cisco sufren las consecuencias del ciberespionaje practicado por su Gobierno

 

 

Muchos recelan de los sistemas que provienen de Estados Unidos, incluido el mercado chino, esperanza de crecimiento para las tecnológicas.

Muchos recelan de los sistemas que provienen de Estados Unidos, incluido el mercado chino, esperanza de crecimiento para las tecnológicas.

 

El tradicional mimo con el que el Gobierno de Estados Unidos trata a sus empresas nacionales y las impulsa a hacer negocios en todo el mundo se ha visto malogrado en estos últimos 12 meses. Se acaba de cumplir un año desde que las primeras revelaciones de Edward Snowden estamparan las páginas de The Guardian y The Washington Post.

Tras el estupor inicial, el debate sobre la privacidad de los ciudadanos se desarrolla en diferentes países y aparece entre los usuarios la preocupación para evitar la dependencia de la tecnología estadounidense. Y entre los principales afectados se encuentran nombres como IBM, Cisco o Microsoft.

Las empresas de Estados Unidos son las que más tecnología exportan a todo el mundo y la amenaza de posibles puertas traseras en sus sistemas es también una amenaza para su negocio. Apenas un mes después del escándalo, más de 50 compañías pidieron en una carta a Barack Obama permiso para ser más transparentes sobre la información que tenían que pasar al gobierno. Fue el primer intento –tímido– por evitar que sus negocios salieran malparados.

A lo largo de este año transcurrido desde las revelaciones sobre la NSA se han podido comprobar los daños económicos más inmediatos para las compañías tecnológicas e incluso estimar los que podrían darse en el futuro. Aun así existen muchos contratos firmados por varios años, con lo que las verdaderas consecuencias se sabrán a medida que vayan expirando estos contratos.

Microsoft ya ha perdido algunos clientes, tanto es así que el pasado mes de enero anunció que permitirá a los usuarios elegir en qué país se almacenarán sus datos. El golpe más importante para la compañía de Redmond ha sido el plan de Brasil para abandonar el uso de Microsoft Outlook, sustituyéndolo por su propio sistema de correo electrónico, con centros de datos locales. De paso, también se ha cancelado un acuerdo de 4.000 millones de dólares por el que el país carioca iba a comprar aviones de combate a Estados Unidos.

La comunicación entre Brasil y Europa hasta ahora se producía mediante cables submarinos estadounidenses, pero la UE y el Gobierno brasileño han aprobado la construcción de nuevos cables, que correrá a cargo de empresas brasileñas y españolas. Mientras que otros países de Latinoamérica, bajo la bandera de UNASUR, están pensando en la posibilidad de crear su propio sistema de comunicaciones a prueba del espionaje de la NSA.


US tech groups must adapt to life after Edward Snowden – FT.com

US tech groups must adapt to life after Edward Snowden – FT.com.

Many early tenets of the internet age no longer apply
Demonstrators hold placards featuring an image of former US intelligence contractor Edward Snowden as they take part in a protest against the US National Security Agency (NSA) collecting German emails, online chats and phone calls and sharing some of it with the country's intelligence services in Berlin©AFP

Demonstrators hold placards featuring former US intelligence contractor Edward Snowden in protest against intelligence services

On the anniversary of Edward Snowden’s revelations that lifted the lid on US internet surveillance, it is worth pondering how much things have changed for American tech companies – and, by extension, their investors.

Like the world before the terrorist attacks of 9/11, the pre-Snowden internet is starting to feel like a more innocent, far-off place. The ascendancy of American internet companies seemed unshakeable. With the exception of China and one or two other countries, there was little to disturb their dominance.

In retrospect, some of the received wisdom from that time is now starting to sound complacent. Its tenets included a borderless internet where information would always flow freely; a standard set of services delivered globally to an audience numbering in the billions; freedom from much of the regulation that encumbers companies trapped in the physical world; and the untrammelled ability to amass large amounts of data to feed evermore refined ad targeting. None of these things feels as assured as it once did.

In reality, the ground had already been shifting, as politicians and regulators took a keener interest in the expanding digital realm. Any hopes of retaining the light-touch regulation of the internet’s early days, when governments were grappling with its implications, already looked like wishful thinking. But the shock from the Snowden disclosures has greatly accelerated the shift.

However it plays out in detail, the direction is clear. Regulations will be tougher and courts more prone to set limits – as Google found last month, when it was ordered to extend a new “right to be forgotten” to people in Europe. Foreign customers will be more likely to consider buying from local suppliers, often with encouragement from their governments. In extreme cases, the Snowden leaks will provide an excuse to shut out US companies altogether on security grounds.

The reaction has been most obvious in countries such as China, which picked this week’s 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square crackdown to step up its rhetorical assault on US internet companies, and Russia, which is leading the way in pushing for data about its citizens to be held on local servers.

One result of all of this, inevitably, will be higher costs. Breaking up the big data holdings of cloud companies into national or regional pools would eat into the scale economies the digital world makes possible. Even without this, more onerous privacy rules are likely to raise the compliance stakes, while limiting the room to experiment with new ways of making money from customer data.

These may be costs worth paying. But in the wake of the Snowden disclosures, there is a danger of excessive reactions that cut into the potential benefits of digital services.

The internet companies, while struggling to reassure their users, are paying the penalty for having appeared in the past to have put their own commercial interests first. Moves like Facebook’s attempt last week to give its members more control over the privacy of their personal data, for instance, may have come too late to change the perception.

US cloud services companies that sell to governments or business customers, meanwhile, will face different pressures. For some, the response will be to rely more heavily on local partners to deliver their services and act as the front line in dealing with regulators. That could lead to more “white label” services from American companies that recede into the background.

Stronger competition in some foreign markets also looks likely as national governments promote their local champions. In China, IBM and Microsoft have been beset by recent reports of official encouragement for some big customers to stop buying their technology.

However, the lock that US companies have in many corners of the IT industry makes it hard to predict how quickly serious competition will emerge. It may be relatively easy to find alternative suppliers for the routers or switches made by a Cisco or the industry-standard servers from a Hewlett-Packard, but much US tech is not quickly replaceable. And when it comes to the type of cloud services that are starting to play a bigger role in IT provision, American companies have taken a definitive early lead.

None of this changes the new realities, though. As the expanding digital platforms of companies like Google and Facebook encroached deeper into everyday life, it was inevitable that they would attract greater scrutiny, envy and resistance. The test for US internet companies in the post-Snowden era will be how well they adapt to the changing times.

Richard Waters is the Financial Times’ West Coast Editor

 


Netflix se consolida y supera a HBO en número de suscriptores – BioBioChile

Netflix se consolida y supera a HBO en número de suscriptores – BioBioChile.

Publicado por Daniela Bravomikepetrucci (cc)

mikepetrucci (cc)

Este nuevo servicio de Internet avanza aceleradamente por delante de la televisión por cable en Estados Unidos, logrando sobrepasar al canal HBO en cuanto al número de suscriptores.

Netflix se está convirtiendo en una adicción, tanto para los fanáticos de las series como de las películas. Si bien ganó el primer Emmy para la televisión por Internet gracias a su serie House of Cards, también está liderando en tema de suscriptores.

Es así como el servicio de Internet ha logrado superar el número de usuarios pagados que HBO posee. De acuerdo a estudios publicados por Bloomberg, HBO tiene 28.7 millones de usuarios, mientras que Netflix ha alcanzado los 30 millones.