Lawsuit Seeks Transparency as Searches of Cellphones and Laptops Skyrocket at Borders

A number of recent cases in the media have revealed instances of U.S. citizens and others being compelled by CBP agents to unlock their devices for search. In some instances, people have claimed to have been physically coerced into complying, including one American citizen who said that CBP agents grabbed him by the neck in order to take his cellphone out of his possession.

Fuente: Lawsuit Seeks Transparency as Searches of Cellphones and Laptops Skyrocket at Borders


Forget Trump’s tweets and media bans. The real issue is his threat to the internet | Charles Ferguson | Opinion | The Guardian

Deregulation could allow the president to undermine freedom of speech in a way that was beyond even Nixon

Fuente: Forget Trump’s tweets and media bans. The real issue is his threat to the internet | Charles Ferguson | Opinion | The Guardian


Commander-In-Chief Donald Trump Will Have Terrifying Powers. Thanks, Obama.

He’ll control an unaccountable drone program, and the prison at Guantanamo Bay. His FBI, including a network of 15,000 paid informants, already has a record of spying on mosques and activists, and his NSA’s surveillance empire is ubiquitous and governed by arcane rules, most of which remain secret. He will inherit bombing campaigns in seven Muslim countries, the de facto ability to declare war unilaterally, and a massive nuclear arsenal — much of which is on hair-trigger alert.

Fuente: Commander-In-Chief Donald Trump Will Have Terrifying Powers. Thanks, Obama.


US and Ecuador deny conspiring to take Julian Assange offline | Media | The Guardian

The journalist John Pilger, a close ally and frequent visitor of Assange in the embassy, told the Guardian that Assange “will have a contingency”, and stressed that WikiLeaks was bigger than its founder.“I can’t imagine that the restrictions will stop the leaks or deter WikiLeaks and Assange,” he said. “The significance of the action by Ecuador, which is clearly under pressure, is to show how frightened the US establishment is of further revelations reaching the public about its preferred presidential candidate.”

Fuente: US and Ecuador deny conspiring to take Julian Assange offline | Media | The Guardian


Ecuador Cuts Internet Access for Julian Assange to Preserve Neutrality in U.S. Election

The government of Ecuador confirmed on Tuesday that it had decided “to temporarily restrict access” to the internet inside its embassy in London, effectively cutting off Julian Assange, the editor of Wikileaks, who has lived there since he was granted political asylum in 2012.Assange first reported on Monday that his internet connection had been “severed by a state party,” and the organization was forced to resort to a back-up plan to continue its work.

Fuente: Ecuador Cuts Internet Access for Julian Assange to Preserve Neutrality in U.S. Election


Half of US adults are recorded in police facial recognition databases, study says | World news | The Guardian

More than 117 million adults included in ‘virtual, perpetual lineup’, which authorities can use to track citizens, raising concerns over privacy and profiling

Fuente: Half of US adults are recorded in police facial recognition databases, study says | World news | The Guardian


Democrats stream gun control sit-in on Periscope after Republicans turn TV cameras off | US news | The Guardian

Nicky Woolf in San Francisco@nickywoolfThursday 23 June 2016 07.32 BSTLast modified on Thursday 23 June 2016 08.28 BST Share on LinkedIn Share on Google+Shares1,259Comments274Save for laterLawmakers turned to Periscope and Facebook Live to broadcast a sit-in protest in the House of Representatives on Wednesday after the Speaker’s office switched off the TV cameras inside the chamber.

Fuente: Democrats stream gun control sit-in on Periscope after Republicans turn TV cameras off | US news | The Guardian


TPP y Sistemas de Arbitraje Inversor-Estado: La soberanía de los pueblos retrocede ante las transnacionales – Resumen

El Acuerdo Transpacífico o TPP representa un sofisticado instrumento jurídico orientado a maximizar los beneficios de empresas transnacionales que operen en los países adheridos a él. Si bien, las conversaciones respecto a sus condiciones concluyeron el 5 de octubre de 2015, recién el 26 de enero de 2016 y el 8 de febrero de 2016, la Dirección General de Relaciones Económicas Internacionales [DIRECON], publicó sus versiones en inglés y en castellano, respectivamente

Fuente: TPP y Sistemas de Arbitraje Inversor-Estado: La soberanía de los pueblos retrocede ante las transnacionales – Resumen


Secret Text in Senate Bill Would Give FBI Warrantless Access to Email Records

A provision snuck into the still-secret text of the Senate’s annual intelligence authorization would give the FBI the ability to demand individuals’ email data and possibly web-surfing history from their service providers without a warrant and in complete secrecy.

Fuente: Secret Text in Senate Bill Would Give FBI Warrantless Access to Email Records


China’s scary lesson to the world: Censoring the Internet works – The Washington Post

BEHIND THE FIREWALL: How China tamed the Internet | This is part of a series examining the impact of China’s Great Firewall, a mechanism of Internet censorship and surveillance that affects nearly 700 million users.

Fuente: China’s scary lesson to the world: Censoring the Internet works – The Washington Post


Microsoft demanda al gobierno de EE.UU. por solicitudes de datos de usuarios – FayerWayer

La compañía acusa al Departamento de Justicia de prohibirles el derecho a informar a sus clientes de saber que están recopilando su información, un requerimiento que sería inconstitucional.

Fuente: Microsoft demanda al gobierno de EE.UU. por solicitudes de datos de usuarios – FayerWayer


Microsoft Says U.S. Is Abusing Secret Warrants

“WE APPRECIATE THAT there are times when secrecy around a government warrant is needed,” Microsoft President Brad Smith wrote in a blog post on Thursday. “But based on the many secrecy orders we have received, we question whether these orders are grounded in specific facts that truly demand secrecy. To the contrary, it appears that the issuance of secrecy orders has become too routine.”With those words, Smith announced that Microsoft was suing the Department of Justice for the right to inform its customers when the government is reading their emails.

Fuente: Microsoft Says U.S. Is Abusing Secret Warrants


Surprise! NSA data will soon routinely be used for domestic policing that has nothing to do with terrorism – The Washington Post

A while back, we noted a report showing that the “sneak-and-peek” provision of the Patriot Act that was alleged to be used only in national security and terrorism investigations has overwhelmingly been used in narcotics cases. Now the New York Times reports that National Security Agency data will be shared with other intelligence agencies like the FBI without first applying any screens for privacy.

Fuente: Surprise! NSA data will soon routinely be used for domestic policing that has nothing to do with terrorism – The Washington Post


Obama Wants Nonexistent Middle Ground on Encryption, Warns Against “Fetishizing Our Phones”

Obama’s first extended disquisition on the contentious issue of encryption suggests he’s only been listening to one side.

Fuente: Obama Wants Nonexistent Middle Ground on Encryption, Warns Against “Fetishizing Our Phones”


US warns of risks from deeper encryption – FT.com

US warns of risks from deeper encryption – FT.com.

 

Jeh Johnson©Getty

Jeh Johnson

The head of the US Department of Homeland Security has warned the cyber security industry that encryption poses “real challenges” for law enforcement.

In a speech at a cyber security conference, RSA in San Francisco, Jeh Johnson called on the industry to find a solution that protected “the basic physical security of the American people” and the “liberties and freedoms we cherish”.

“The current course on deeper and deeper encryption is one that presents real challenges for those in law enforcement and national security,” he said.He said he understood the importance of encryption for privacy but asked the audience to imagine what it would have meant for law enforcement if, after the invention of the telephone, all the police could search was people’s letters.

Mr Johnson’s comments echo those of FBI director James Comey who called on Congress last year to stop the rise of encryption where no one held a key and so law enforcement agencies could not unlock it.

In the UK, the director of GCHQ criticised US technology companies last year for becoming “the command and control networks of choice” for terrorists by protecting communications. Across Europe, police forces have become concerned by their inability to track the communications of people who plan to travel to the Middle East to join the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (Isis).

 


DEA sued over secret bulk collection of Americans' phone records | US news | The Guardian

DEA sued over secret bulk collection of Americans’ phone records | US news | The Guardian.

US phone data Human Rights Watch alleges that the bulk surveillance puts its work in jeopardy. Photograph: Felix Clay

Human rights campaigners have prepared a federal lawsuit aiming to permanently shut down the bulk collection of billions of US phone records – not, this time, by the National Security Agency, but by the Drug Enforcement Agency.

Human Rights Watch, represented by the Electronic Frontier Foundation, filed their lawsuit in Los Angeles federal court on Wednesday morning to stop the DEA from hoovering up billions of records of Americans’ international calls without a warrant.

The reach of the program, exposed by USA Today, lasted for two decades and served as a template for the NSA’s gigantic and ongoing bulk surveillance of US phone data after 9/11.

Though US officials insist the DEA is now out of the bulk-collection business, the revelation of mass phone-records collection in the so-called “war on drugs” raises new questions about whether the Obama administration or its successors believe US security agencies continue to have legal leeway for warrantless bulk surveillance on American citizens, even as officials forswear those powers publicly.


How Big Business Is Helping Expand NSA Surveillance, Snowden Be Damned – The Intercept

How Big Business Is Helping Expand NSA Surveillance, Snowden Be Damned – The Intercept.

Featured photo - How Big Business Is Helping Expand NSA Surveillance, Snowden Be Damned

Since November 11, 2011, with the introduction of the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, American spy agencies have been pushing laws to encourage corporations to share more customer information. They repeatedly failed, thanks in part to NSA contractor Edward Snowden’s revelations of mass government surveillance. Then came Republican victories in last year’s midterm Congressional elections and a major push by corporate interests in favor of the legislation.

Today, the bill is back, largely unchanged, and if congressional insiders and the bill’s sponsors are to believed, the legislation could end up on President Obama’s desk as soon as this month. In another boon to the legislation, Obama is expected to reverse his past opposition and sign it, albeit in an amended and renamed form (CISPA is now CISA, the “Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act”). The reversal comes in the wake of high-profile hacks on JPMorgan Chase and Sony Pictures Entertainment. The bill has also benefitted greatly from lobbying by big business, which sees it as a way to cut costs and to shift some anti-hacking defenses onto the government.

For all its appeal to corporations, CISA represents a major new privacy threat to individual citizens. It lays the groundwork for corporations to feed massive amounts of communications to private consortiums and the federal government, a scale of cooperation even greater than that revealed by Snowden. The law also breaks new ground in suppressing pushback against privacy invasions; in exchange for channeling data to the government, businesses are granted broad legal immunity from privacy lawsuits — potentially leaving consumers without protection if companies break privacy promises that would otherwise keep information out of the hands of authorities.

Ostensibly, CISA is supposed to help businesses guard against cyberattacks by sharing information on threats with one another and with the government. Attempts must be made to filter personal information out of the pool of data that is shared. But the legislation — at least as marked up by the Senate Intelligence Committee — provides an expansive definition of what can be construed as a cybersecurity threat, including any information for responding to or mitigating “an imminent threat of death, serious bodily harm, or serious economic harm,” or information that is potentially related to threats relating to weapons of mass destruction, threats to minors, identity theft, espionage, protection of trade secrets, and other possible offenses. Asked at a hearing in February how quickly such information could be shared with the FBI, CIA, or NSA, Deputy Undersecretary for Cybersecurity Phyllis Schneck replied, “fractions of a second.”

Questions persist on how to more narrowly define a cybersecurity threat, what type of personal data is shared, and which government agencies would retain and store this data. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., who cast the lone dissenting vote against CISA on the Senate Intelligence Committee, declared the legislation “a surveillance bill by another name.” Privacy advocates agree. “The lack of use limitations creates yet another loophole for law enforcement to conduct backdoor searches on Americans,” argues aletter sent by a coalition of privacy organizations, including Free Press Action Fund and New America’s Open Technology Institute. Critics also argue that CISA would not have prevented the recent spate of high-profile hacking incidents. As the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Mark Jaycox noted in a blog post, the JPMorgan hack occurred because of an “un-updated server” and prevailing evidence about the Sony breach is “increasingly pointing to an inside job.”

But the intelligence community and corporate America have this year unified behind the bill. For a look into the breadth of the corporate advocacy campaign to pass CISA, see this letter cosigned by many of the most powerful corporate interests in America and sent to legislators earlier this year. Or another letter, reported in the Wall Street Journal, signed by “general counsels of more than 30 different firms, including 3M and Lockheed Martin Corp.”


La CIA intenta hace años descifrar los aparatos Apple – BioBioChile

La CIA intenta hace años descifrar los aparatos Apple – BioBioChile.


AFP Photo

AFP Photo

Publicado por Eduardo Woo | La Información es de Agencia AFP
La CIA trabaja desde hace años en descifrar la encriptación de los aparatos Apple a fin de poder espiar las comunicaciones realizadas desde los iPhones y iPads, afirma una investigación publicada el martes por un diario estadounidense.

The Intercept, diario en línea dirigido por Glenn Greenwald, se sustenta en documentos secretos develados por Edward Snowden para afirmar que la Agencia Central de Inteligencia (CIA) intenta desde 2006, es decir un año antes del lanzamiento del iPhone, penetrar las claves cifradas de los aparatos Apple.


CIA 'tried to crack security of Apple devices' | Technology | The Guardian

CIA ‘tried to crack security of Apple devices’ | Technology | The Guardian.

 

The Apple logoThe revelations, published by the Intercept online news organisation, are likely to further strain the relationship between Apple and the US government. Photograph: Yuya Shino/Reuters

The CIA led sophisticated intelligence agency efforts to undermine the encryption used in Apple phones, as well as insert secret surveillance back doors into apps, top-secret documents published by the Intercept online news site have revealed.

The newly disclosed documents from the National Security Agency’s internal systems show surveillance methods were presented at its secret annual conference, known as the “jamboree”.

The most serious of the various attacks disclosed at the event was the creation of a dummy version of Apple’s development software Xcode, which is used by developers to create apps for iOS devices.

The modified version of Xcode would allow the CIA, NSA or other agencies to insert surveillance backdoors into any app created using the compromised development software. The revelation has already provoked a strong backlash among security researchers on Twitter and elsewhere, and is likely to prompt security audits among Apple developers.

The latest revelations of sustained hacking efforts against Apple devices are set to further strain already difficult relations between the technology company and the US government.

Apple had previously been a partner in the Prism programme, in effect a legal backdoor to obtain user information by the NSA and its allies, but in the wake of the Snowden revelations it has stepped up efforts to protect user privacy, including introducing end-to-end encryption on iMessages.


iSpy: The CIA Campaign to Steal Apple's Secrets

iSpy: The CIA Campaign to Steal Apple’s Secrets.

 

 

RESEARCHERS WORKING with the Central Intelligence Agency have conducted a multi-year, sustained effort to break the security of Apple’s iPhones and iPads, according to top-secret documents obtained by The Intercept.

 

The security researchers presented their latest tactics and achievements at a secret annual gathering, called the “Jamboree,” where attendees discussed strategies for exploiting security flaws in household and commercial electronics. The conferences have spanned nearly a decade, with the first CIA-sponsored meeting taking place a year before the first iPhone was released.

 

By targeting essential security keys used to encrypt data stored on Apple’s devices, the researchers have sought to thwart the company’s attempts to provide mobile security to hundreds of millions of Apple customers across the globe. Studying both “physical” and “non-invasive” techniques, U.S. government-sponsored research has been aimed at discovering ways to decrypt and ultimately penetrate Apple’s encrypted firmware. This could enable spies to plant malicious code on Apple devices and seek out potential vulnerabilities in other parts of the iPhone and iPad currently masked by encryption.


Apple and Google 'FREAK attack' leaves millions of users vulnerable to hackers | Technology | The Guardian

Apple and Google ‘FREAK attack’ leaves millions of users vulnerable to hackers | Technology | The Guardian.

The Apple logo inside an Apple store in Tokyo. The company is working to fix a potential security issue which could leave devices vulnerable to hackers. The Apple logo inside an Apple store in Tokyo. The company is working to fix a potential security issue which could leave devices vulnerable to hackers. Photograph: Yuya Shino/Reuters

Millions of people may have been left vulnerable to hackers while surfing the web on Apple and Google devices, thanks to a newly discovered security flaw known as “FREAK attack.”

There’s no evidence so far that any hackers have exploited the weakness, which companies are now moving to repair. Researchers blame the problem on an old government policy, abandoned over a decade ago, which required US software makers to use weaker security in encryption programs sold overseas due to national security concerns.

Many popular websites and some internet browsers continued to accept the weaker software, or can be tricked into using it, according to experts at several research institutions who reported their findings Tuesday.

They said that could make it easier for hackers to break the encryption that’s supposed to prevent digital eavesdropping when a visitor types sensitive information into a website.

About a third of all encrypted websites were vulnerable as of Tuesday, including sites operated by American Express, Groupon, Kohl’s, Marriott and some government agencies, the researchers said.


La reforma de la NSA se queda a medio camino un año después | Internacional | EL PAÍS

La reforma de la NSA se queda a medio camino un año después | Internacional | EL PAÍS.


Algunos de los cambios anunciados por Obama no se han materializado

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Centro de datos de la NSA, en Utah. / RICK BOWMER (AP)

El teléfono de J. Kirk Wiebe suena desde hace unos meses con menos frecuencia. Wiebe fue uno de los primeros filtradores de la Agencia Nacional de Seguridad. Tras jubilarse en 2001, denunció, junto a dos veteranos exanalistas, que la NSA tenía cada vez más acceso a datos personales. Lograron poca atención y fueron perseguidos en la justicia. Pero en junio de 2013, adquirieron notoriedad gracias a las revelaciones deEdward Snowden sobre los largos tentáculos de la NSA: empezaron a dar muchas más charlas en Estados Unidos y Europa sobre su experiencia e influencia.

“Snowden nos había visto diciendo que intentamos ir por los canales internos del Gobierno y no conseguimos nada”, subraya Wiebe en alusión a que, tras fracasar ellos, Snowden optase por filtrar secretos a la prensa en vez de formular una queja interna en la NSA.

Pero ahora, al año y medio de las filtraciones de Snowden y al año de anunciarse la reforma de los programas de vigilancia, se habla mucho menos del joven exanalista refugiado en Rusia y del espionaje masivo. “La excitación ha bajado un poco, pero a la gente sigue sin gustarle [la NSA]”, agrega en una entrevista telefónica Wiebe, de 70 años, 30 de ellos en la agencia. La percepción pública sobre la NSA apenas ha variado: en octubre de 2013, un 54% tenía una opinión favorable; en enero de este año, un 51% (sobre todo jóvenes), según una encuesta del centro Pew.

Al año y medio de las filtraciones de Snowden y al año de anunciarse la reforma de los programas de vigilancia, se habla mucho menos del joven exanalista refugiado en Rusia y del espionaje masivo

Sin embargo, buena parte del debate en EE UU sobre los límites de la recopilación masiva de datos ha quedado eclipsado. El contexto ha cambiado, lo que puede propiciar retrocesos: crecen las voces que, ante el auge del yihadismo, se oponen a restringir los programas de vigilancia, y reclaman que las autoridades tengan plenos poderes para desbloquear la encriptación de teléfonos móviles.

La reforma de la NSA se ha quedado, por ahora, a medio camino. En enero de 2014, el presidente de EE UU, Barack Obama, anunció un conjunto de cambios para limitar la interceptación de datos sin mermar la protección de la seguridad nacional. Su objetivo era atenuar las preocupaciones de ciudadanos estadounidenses y gobiernos extranjeros aliados sobre posibles injerencias a la privacidad.


Ex-MI6 chief calls for new compact between internet firms and spy agencies | UK news | The Guardian

Ex-MI6 chief calls for new compact between internet firms and spy agencies | UK news | The Guardian.

Sir John Sawers says Snowden revelations shattered informal relationship but cooperation is necessary to prevent attacks

 

 

Former MI6 chief Sir John Sawers
Sir John Sawers said it was impossible to monitor terrorist activities without intruding upon the lives of others. Photograph: Elyse Marks/Edelman/PA

 

The former head of MI6, Sir John Sawers, has called for a new surveillance compact between internet companies and the security services in the UK and US in the wake of the Snowden revelations.

 

In his first speech since standing down as “C” at the end of last year, Sawers said the two could work together as they had in the past to prevent a repeat of events such as the Charlie Hebdo attack, the always present threats from militant Islamists in places such as Yemen, and the advance of Boko Haram in Nigeria.

 

In other parts of the speech, he aligned himself with Pope Francis in calling for restraint in offending the religious sensitivities of others after the Paris attack. He also, surprisingly, distanced MI6 from the CIA over what he called “lethal” operations.

 

Sawers, who is going into the private sector after decades in the Foreign Office and latterly at MI6, said the Snowden revelations in 2013 had shattered the previous informal relationship between tech companies and the surveillance agencies.

 

Companies such as Google and Microsoft had suffered a consumer backlash as a result of the revelations and are increasingly unwilling to cooperate to the same degree, creating a headache for the surveillance agencies in the US and the UK.


EE.UU. ‘quebrantó’ las redes informáticas de Corea del Norte en 2010 – El Mostrador

EE.UU. ‘quebrantó’ las redes informáticas de Corea del Norte en 2010 – El Mostrador.

La Agencia de Seguridad Nacional logró romper las barreras informáticas en 2010 y entrar en los sistemas norcoreanos a través de las redes chinas que conectan a este país con el resto del mundo.

eeuucoreadelnorte

Estados Unidos “quebrantó” las redes informáticas de Corea del Norte en 2010 y por eso supo que el país estaba detrás del ataque a Sony Pictures, reportaron The New York Times y Der Spiegel.

Corea del Norte dedicó dos meses a entrar en los sistemas de Sony después de que la empresa anunciara sus planes para producir una comedia sobre el asesinato del líder de este país, titulada “The Interview”.

La Agencia de Seguridad Nacional logró romper las barreras informáticas en 2010 y entrar en los sistemas norcoreanos a través de las redes chinas que conectan a este país con el resto del mundo.

Corea del Norte ha negado repetidamente su responsabilidad en el ciberataque contra Sony.


Latest FBI Claim of Disrupted Terror Plot Deserves Much Scrutiny and Skepticism – The Intercept

Latest FBI Claim of Disrupted Terror Plot Deserves Much Scrutiny and Skepticism – The Intercept.

BY GLENN GREENWALD AND ANDREW FISHMAN 

Featured photo - Latest FBI Claim of Disrupted Terror Plot Deserves Much Scrutiny and Skepticism

The Justice Department on Wednesday issued a press release trumpeting its latest success in disrupting a domestic terrorism plot, announcing that “the Joint Terrorism Task Force has arrested a Cincinnati-area man for a plot to attack the U.S. Capitol and kill government officials.” The alleged would-be terrorist is 20-year-old Christopher Cornell (above), who is unemployed, lives at home, spends most of his time playing video games in his bedroom, still addresses his mother as “Mommy” and regards his cat as his best friend; he was described as “a typical student” and “quiet but not overly reserved” by the principal of the local high school he graduated in 2012.

The affidavit filed by an FBI investigative agent alleges Cornell had “posted comments and information supportive of [ISIS] through Twitter accounts.” The FBI learned about Cornell from an unnamed informant who, as the FBI put it, “began cooperating with the FBI in order to obtain favorable treatment with respect to his criminal exposure on an unrelated case.” Acting under the FBI’s direction, the informant arranged two in-person meetings with Cornell where they allegedly discussed an attack on the Capitol, and the FBI says it arrested Cornell to prevent him from carrying out the attack.

Family members say Cornell converted to Islam just six months ago and claimed he began attending a small local mosque. Yet The Cincinnati Enquirer could not find a single person at that mosque who had ever seen him before, and noted that a young, white, recent convert would have been quite conspicuous at a mosque largely populated by “immigrants from West Africa,” many of whom “speak little or no English.”

The DOJ’s press release predictably generated an avalanche of scary media headlines hailing the FBI. CNN: “FBI says plot to attack U.S. Capitol was ready to go.” MSNBC: “US terror plot foiled by FBI arrest of Ohio man.” Wall St. Journal: “Ohio Man Charged With Plotting ISIS-Inspired Attack on U.S. Capitol.”

Just as predictably, political officials instantly exploited the news to justify their powers of domestic surveillance. House Speaker John Boehner claimed yesterday that “the National Security Agency’s snooping powers helped stop a plot to attack the Capitol and that his colleagues need to keep that in mind as they debate whether to renew the law that allows the government to collect bulk information from its citizens.” He warned: “We live in a dangerous country, and we get reminded every week of the dangers that are out there.” 


Barack Obama and David Cameron fail to see eye to eye on surveillance | US news | The Guardian

Barack Obama and David Cameron fail to see eye to eye on surveillance | US news | The Guardian.


British prime minister takes tougher line on internet companies than US president at White House talks on Islamist threats

In Washington, David Cameron announces the creation of a joint group between the US and the UK to counter the rise of domestic violent extremism in the two countries

Barack Obama and David Cameron struck different notes on surveillance powers after the president conceded that there is an important balance to be struck between monitoring terror suspects and protecting civil liberties.

As Cameron warned the internet giants that they must do more to ensure they do not become platforms for terrorist communications, the US president said he welcomed the way in which civil liberties groups hold them to account by tapping them on the shoulder.

Obama agreed with the prime minister that there could be no spaces on the internet for terrorists to communicate that could not be monitored by the intelligences agencies, subject to proper oversight. But, unlike Cameron, the president encouraged groups to ensure that he and other leaders do not abandon civil liberties.

The prime minister adopted a harder stance on the need for big internet companies such as Facebook and Twitter to do more to cooperate with the surveillance of terror suspects. In an interview with Channel 4 News he said they had to be careful not to act as a communications platform for terrorists.


Maniobras de ciberguerra a orillas del Atlántico | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Maniobras de ciberguerra a orillas del Atlántico | Internacional | EL PAÍS.


EE UU y Reino Unido lanzan ejercicios y equipos mixtos de expertos para responder a la oleada de ataques informáticos

 /  /  Londres / Washington / Madrid 17 ENE 2015 – 02:33CET2

Cameron y Obama en Washington / E.V. (AP) / VÍDEO: REUTERS LIVE

A lo largo de 2015 los poderosos sectores financieros de Estados Unidos y Reino Unido, posiblemente el Banco de Inglaterra y Wall Street, serán objeto de un ciberataque. Será, en realidad, un ataque ficticio. Un simulacro. El primero de una serie de ejercicios conjuntos entre los servicios de espionaje, que se producirán en el marco de un acuerdo “sin precedentes” entre los dos aliados, para poner a prueba los mecanismos de seguridad en las “infraestructuras nacionales críticas” ante la amenaza de los cibercriminales.

Así lo confirmaron el viernes en Washington el primer ministro británico, el conservador David Cameron, y el presidente estadounidense, Barack Obama. “Dado el urgente y creciente peligro de los ciberataques, hemos decidido expandir nuestra cooperación en ciberseguridad para proteger nuestra infraestructura más crítica, nuestros negocios y la privacidad de nuestros pueblos”, dijo Obama.

A renglón seguido, el primer ministro británico coincidió en la necesidad de forjar una estructura conjunta que pueda proteger “mejor” a sus países ante los ciberataques, en referencia al asalto atribuido a Corea del Norte contra la compañía Sony a finales de año o el que esta semana afectó a la cuenta en Twitter del Mando Central de EE UU, lanzado presuntamente por simpatizantes del Estado Islámico (EI).

Cameron, que ya adelantó los planes conjuntos de ambos aliados antes de reunirse con Obama, ha intensificado, tras el ataque contra el semanario francés Charlie Hebdo, su campaña para lograr que los Gobiernos dispongan de más poderes para acceder a la actividad en Internet de los sospechosos de terrorismo, y busca aliados en su empeño.


Obama coloca la ciberseguridad en el centro del debate en EE UU | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Obama coloca la ciberseguridad en el centro del debate en EE UU | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

El presidente propone un paquete legislativo en un momento de crecientes ataques informáticos y tras el inicio del nuevo Congreso

Obama, en su discurso sobre ciberseguridad. / Evan Vucci (AP)

Varios ataques informáticos recientes han colocado la ciberseguridad entre los grandes debates políticos en Estados Unidos. El presidente Barack Obama busca aprovechar este contexto favorable y la nueva legislatura en el Congreso -con mayoría republicana- para tratar de sacar adelante un paquete legislativo que endurece la lucha contra la piratería informática.

La Casa Blanca presentó en 2011 una propuesta de ley sobre ciberseguridad, que avanzó en la Cámara de Representantes republicana, pero no prosperó en el Senado, controlado hasta hace una semana por el Partido Demócrata de Obama. Este martes, el presidente hizo un nuevo intento al anunciar una iniciativa que coincide en grandes líneas con la de hace cuatro años.

“Las amenazas cibernéticas son urgentes y un peligro creciente”, afirmó Obama en un breve discurso en el Centro Nacional de Ciberseguridad, a las afueras de Washington. “El ataque a Sony, la cuenta de Twitter [del Ejército] pirateada [el lunes] por simpatizantes de yihadistas islámicos demuestran que el sector público y privado tienen que hacer mucho más trabajo en fortalecer nuestra ciberseguridad”, había dicho en una reunión con los líderes del Congreso, poco antes de desvelar su plan.

El paquete legislativo forma parte de las iniciativas que Obama expondrá el próximo martes en su discurso anual en el Capitolio sobre el estado de la Unión. La semana pasada, el presidente ya avanzó otra propuesta sobre el sistema universitario. No es habitual que un presidente anticipe con tanto detalle algunas claves de su discurso. Con ello, Obama busca crear un terreno favorable en la opinión pública y entre los legisladores.

Su propuesta en ciberseguridad medirá el apetito del Congreso en endurecer la ley en ese ámbito en un momento de crecientes ataques informáticos en EE UU. Al margen de Sony y las redes del Ejército, las incursiones también han afectado en los últimos meses a grandes empresas, como Target, Home Depot y JPMorgan. El plan del presidente también determinará el peso del respeto a la privacidad -que ha hecho descarrilar las iniciativas legales anteriores- en el debate político un año y medio después de destapar el exanalista Edward Snowden el espionaje masivo de la Agencia Nacional de Seguridad (NSA).

Obama propone actuar en tres ámbitos: conceder protección legal a las empresas que compartan con el Gobierno información sobre amenazas informáticas, dotar de más poderes a la justicia para investigar y perseguir a los autores de ataques y la compraventa de información sustraída a empresas y particulares; y armonizar la amalgama de leyes estatales que obligan a las compañías a notificar a los clientes si sus datos pueden haber sido robados.


NSA Played Key Role Linking North Korea to Sony Hack – The Intercept

NSA Played Key Role Linking North Korea to Sony Hack – The Intercept.

Featured photo - NSA Played Key Role Linking North Korea to Sony Hack

National Security Agency data and technical analysis assisted in the U.S. government’s attribution of the Sony cyber attack to North Korea, Admiral Michael Rogers said on Thursday.

“We partner with the Department of Homeland Security and FBI in various areas and this is one such area,” Rogers, the NSA director, said in response to a question from a reporter with The Daily Beast about the agency’s role, if any, in the attribution of the Sony attack to North Korea.


North Korea responds with fury to US sanctions over Sony hack | World news | The Guardian

North Korea responds with fury to US sanctions over Sony hack | World news | The Guardian.


Pyongyang denies involvement in Sony Pictures hack and accuses US of stirring up hostility

Obama and Kim
The US president, Barack Obama, and North Korean leader, Kim Jong-un. Photograph: Michael Nelson/KCNA/EPA

North Korea has furiously denounced the United States for imposing sanctions in retaliation for the Pyongyang regime’s alleged cyber-attack on Sony Pictures.

North Korea’s foreign ministry reiterated that it did not have any role in the breach of tens of thousands of confidential Sony emails and business files and accused the US of “groundlessly” stirring up hostility towards Pyongyang. He said the new sanctions would not weaken the country’s 1.2 million-strong military.

“The policy persistently pursued by the US to stifle the DPRK [North Korea], groundlessly stirring up bad blood towards it, will only harden its will and resolution to defend the sovereignty of the country,” North’s state-run KCNA news agency quoted the unnamed spokesman as saying on Sunday.

On Friday, the US sanctioned 10 North Korean government officials and three organisations, including Pyongyang’s primary intelligence agency and state-run arms dealer, in what the White House described as an opening move in the response towards the Sony cyber-attack. It was the first time the US has imposed sanctions on another nation in direct retaliation for hacking an American company. Barack Obama also warned that the US was considering whether to put the authoritarian regime back on its list of state sponsors of terrorism.

North Korea expressed fury over The Interview, a Sony comedy about a fictional CIA plot to kill Kim Jong-un, slamming it as an “act of terror”. It denied hacking Sony, but called the act a “righteous deed”.

There have been doubts in the cyber community about the extent of North Korea’s involvement in the hacking. Many experts have said it is possible that hackers or even Sony insiders could be the culprits, and questioned how the FBI could point the finger so conclusively.

Pyongyang has demanded a joint investigation into the attack and claimed US rejection of the proposal was proof of its guilty conscience and that it was seeking a pretext for further isolating North Korea.


Obama autoriza sanciones a Corea del Norte tras el ciberataque a Sony | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Obama autoriza sanciones a Corea del Norte tras el ciberataque a Sony | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

Un canal de Corea del Sur emite una noticia sobre Sony. / AHN YOUNG-JOON (AP)

El presidente de Estados Unidos, Barack Obama, ha dado este viernes su autorización para aumentar las sanciones contra el régimen de Corea del Norte. Según ha explicado la Casa Blanca, la medida es una respuesta a las “continuadas acciones y políticas provocadoras, desestabilizadoras y represivas” de Pyongyang. Especialmente, ha subrayado, por el “ciberataque coercitivo y destructivo contra Sony Pictures” tras la producción de la película La Entrevista.

Esta comedia sobre dos periodistas reclutados por la CIA para asesinar al líder norcoreano, Kim Jong-un, desató las iras y amenazas de Corea del Norte el mes pasado, hasta el punto de que Sony llegó a cancelar su estreno en cartelera, previsto el día de Navidad. Finalmente, tras fuertes críticas por el paso atrás, incluso de Obama, la cinta fue exhibida en varios centenares de cine independientes y a través de plataformas digitales de pago, en lo que fue descrito en EE UU como una manera de defender la libertad de expresión.

Aunque algunos especialistas en informática han puesto en duda la versión oficial, el Gobierno de Obama y el FBI insisten en señalar a Pyongyang como el responsable del ataque informático contra Sony a finales de noviembre. Una posición reiterada este viernes por altos funcionarios del Gobierno al desgranar las sanciones autorizadas por Obama, quien reafirma de esta manera también su señalamiento hacia Corea del Norte.

“Mientras el FBI continúa su investigación sobre el ciberataque, estas nuevas medidas dejan claro que haremos uso de un amplio abanico de herramientas para defender los negocios estadounidenses y a sus ciudadanos, y para responder a los intentos de minar nuestros valores o de amenazar la seguridad nacional de EE UU”, ha declarado por su parte el secretario del Tesoro, Jacob Lew.

Su departamento es el encargado de aplicar las nuevas sanciones, que afectan a tres empresas norcoreanas y a diez altos funcionarios del régimen de Kim y responsables de las entidades afectadas. Su designación bloquea cualquier activo de los afectados en territorio estadounidense y les deniega también otro tipo de acceso al sistema financiero norteamericano. Además, prohíbe a cualquier empresa o ciudadano de EE UU realizar cualquier tipo de transacción con los sancionados.


Human Rights Watch denuncia censura del régimen de Rafael Correa a contenidos antigubernamentales en Internet – El Mostrador

Human Rights Watch denuncia censura del régimen de Rafael Correa a contenidos antigubernamentales en Internet – El Mostrador.

El director ejecutivo para las Américas de la ONG dedicada a cautelar los derechos humanos, alertó sobre los métodos que tienen instituciones vinculadas al Estado para hacer desaparecer perfiles de facebook, videos de YouTube y cuentas de Twitter, sumándose a la crítica situación de la libertad de prensa en ese país.

correa

El chileno José Miguel Vivanco, director ejecutivo para las Américas de la ONG Human Rights Watch, denunció en una columna publicada por el diario español El País, cómo el gobierno ecuatoriano encabezado por Rafael Correa se las arregla para sacar de Internet el contenido que considera crítico a la gestión del gobierno y a la persona del Presidente.

“El  Gobierno encontró una nueva herramienta para acallar la libertad de expresión en el país. En un momento en el cual los periódicos, las estaciones de radio y los canales de televisión ecuatorianos enfrentan cada vez más dificultades para publicar libremente información crítica, los ciudadanos recurren a Internet, el último espacio que les queda para obtener, difundir y compartir informaciones y opiniones. Pareciera que, si fuera por las autoridades, no debería quedarles ni siquiera eso”, escribió Vivanco junto al profesor Eduardo Bertoni, ex relator para la libertad de expresión de la OEA.


Entrevista a Julian Assange, fundador de Wikileaks: “Google nos espía e informa al Gobierno de Estados Unidos”

Entrevista a Julian Assange, fundador de Wikileaks: “Google nos espía e informa al Gobierno de Estados Unidos”.

Escrito por Ignacio Ramonet / Le Monde Diplomatique
Lunes, 01 de Diciembre de 2014 11:59

Desde hace treinta meses, Julian Assange, paladín de la lucha por una información libre, vive en Londres, refugiado en las oficinas de la Embajada de Ecuador. Este país latinoamericano tuvo el coraje de brindarle asilo diplomático cuando el fundador de WikiLeaks se hallaba perseguido y acosado por el Gobierno de Estados Unidos y varios de sus aliados (el Reino Unido, Suecia). El único crimen de Julian Assange es haber dicho la verdad y haber difundido, vía WikiLeaks, entre otras revelaciones, las siniestras realidades ocultas de las guerras de Irak y de Afganistán, y los tejemanejes e intrigas de la diplomacia estadounidense.

Como Edward Snowden, Chelsea Manning y Glenn Greenwald, Julian Assange forma parte de un nuevo grupo de disidentes que, por descubrir la verdad, son ahora rastreados, perseguidos y hostigados no por regímenes autoritarios sino por Estados que pretenden ser “democracias ejemplares”…

En su nuevo libro, Cuando Google encontró a WikiLeaks (Clave Intelectual, Madrid, 2014), cuya versión en español está en librerías desde el 1 de diciembre, Julian Assange va más lejos en sus revelaciones, estupendamente documentadas, como siempre. Todo parte de una larga conversación que Assange sostuvo, en junio de 2011, con Eric Schmidt, presidente ejecutivo de Google. Este vino a entrevistar al creador de WikiLeaks para un ensayo que estaba preparando sobre el futuro de la era digital. Cuando se publicó el libro, titulado The New Digital Era (2013), Assange constató que sus declaraciones habían sido tergiversadas y que las tesis defendidas por Schmidt eran considerablemente delirantes y megalomaníacas. El nuevo libro del fundador de WikiLeaks es su respuesta a esas elucubraciones del presidente de Google. Entre muchas otras cosas, Assange revela cómo Google –y Facebook, y Amazon, etc.– nos espía y nos vigila; y cómo transmite esa información a las agencias de inteligencia de Estados Unidos. Y cómo la empresa líder en tecnologías digitales tiene una estrecha relación, casi estructural, con el Departamento de Estado. Afirma también Assange, que hoy, las grandes empresas de la galaxia digital nos vigilan y nos controlan más que los propios Estados.

Cuando Google encontró a WikiLeaks es una obra inteligente, estimulante y necesaria. Una fiesta para el espíritu. Nos abre los ojos sobre nuestras propias prácticas de comunicación cotidianas cuando usamos un smartphone, una tablet, un ordenador o cuando navegamos simplemente por Internet con la candidez de quien se cree más libre que nunca. ¡Ojo! Nos explica Assange, como Pulgarcito, vas sembrando rastros de ti mismo y de tu vida privada que algunas empresas, como Google, recogen con sumo cuidado y archivan secretamente. Un día, las utilizarán contra ti…

Para conversar de todo esto y de algunas cosas más, nos encontramos con un Julian Assange entusiasta y fatigado, en Londres, el pasado 24 de octubre, en una pequeña sala acogedora de la Embajada de Ecuador. Llega sonriente y pálido, con una barba rubia de varios días, con su cabeza de ángel prerrafaelista, cabellos largos, rasgos finos, ojos claros… Es alto y delgado. Habla con voz muy baja y lenta. Lo que dice es profundo y pensado, le sale de muy adentro. Tiene un algo de gurú… Habíamos previsto charlar no más de media hora, para no cansarlo, pero con el paso del tiempo la conversación se fue poniendo interesante. Y finalmente hablamos más de dos horas y media…


Apple encryption: Stop the hysteria (Opinion) – CNN.com

Apple encryption: Stop the hysteria (Opinion) – CNN.com.

By Bruce Schneier
October 4, 2014 — Updated 1641 GMT (0041 HKT)
It all started with a truck driver in St. Louis. Ok, if we're being honest, it all started with a Swedish engineer named Lars Magnus Ericsson and <a href='http://www.ehow.com/about_5426865_history-car-phones.html ' target='_blank'>some electrical wires</a>... but let's skip ahead a few decades. The first mobile call was made on an<a href='http://www.corp.att.com/attlabs/reputation/timeline/46mobile.html ' target='_blank'> AT&amp;T car phone</a> in 1946. But owning a car phone didn't become mainstream until the 1980s. Now <a href='http://www.cnn.com/2011/TECH/mobile/10/03/cell.phones.numbers.gallery/index.html '>85% of American adults</a> own a cell phone, and we're annoyed when we can't get service. In celebration of the <a href='http://www.cnn.com/2011/10/04/tech/mobile/apple-iphone-announcement/index.html'>iPhone 4S's release</a>, take a look back at the evolution of popular mobile phones in the U.S.

It all started with a truck driver in St. Louis. Ok, if we’re being honest, it all started with a Swedish engineer named Lars Magnus Ericsson andsome electrical wires… but let’s skip ahead a few decades. The first mobile call was made on an AT&T car phone in 1946. But owning a car phone didn’t become mainstream until the 1980s. Now 85% of American adults own a cell phone, and we’re annoyed when we can’t get service. In celebration of theiPhone 4S’s release, take a look back at the evolution of popular mobile phones in the U.S.

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STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Schneier: Apple closed serious security vulnerability in the iPhone, enabling wide encryption
  • He says law enforcement overreacted in saying it is a major form of protection for criminals
  • Law enforcement always complains about encryption but is little stymied by it, he says
  • Schneier: The benefits in protecting privacy far outweigh the costs

Editor’s note: Bruce Schneier is a security technologist and the chief technology officer of Co3 Systems. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author.

(CNN) — Last week Apple announced that it is closing a serious security vulnerability in the iPhone. It used to be that the phone’s encryption only protected a small amount of the data, and Apple had the ability to bypass security on the rest of it.

From now on, all the phone’s data is protected. It can no longer be accessed by criminals, governments, or rogue employees. Access to it can no longer be demanded by totalitarian governments. A user’s iPhone data is now more secure.

To hear U.S. law enforcement respond, you’d think Apple’s move heralded an unstoppable crime wave. See, the FBI had been using that vulnerability to get into peoples’ iPhones. In the words of cyberlaw professor Orin Kerr, “How is the public interest served by a policy that only thwarts lawful search warrants?”

Bruce Schneier

Bruce Schneier

Ah, but that’s the thing: You can’t build a “back door” that only the good guys can walk through. Encryption protects against cybercriminals, industrial competitors, the Chinese secret police and the FBI. You’re either vulnerable to eavesdropping by any of them, or you’re secure from eavesdropping from all of them.

Back-door access built for the good guys is routinely used by the bad guys. In 2005, some unknown groupsurreptitiously used the lawful-intercept capabilities built into the Greek cell phone system. The same thing happened in Italy in 2006.

In 2010, Chinese hackers subverted an intercept system Google had put into Gmail to comply with U.S. government surveillance requests. Back doors in our cell phone system are currently being exploited by the FBI and unknown others.

This doesn’t stop the FBI and Justice Department from pumping up the fear. Attorney General Eric Holder threatened us with kidnappersand sexual predators.

The former head of the FBI’s criminal investigative division went even further, conjuring up kidnappers who are also sexual predators. And, of course, terrorists.

FBI Director James Comey claimed that Apple’s move allows people to place themselves beyond the law” and also invoked that now overworked “child kidnapper.” John J. Escalante, chief of detectives for the Chicago police department now holds the title of most hysterical: “Apple will become the phone of choice for the pedophile.”

It’s all bluster. Of the 3,576 major offenses for which warrants were granted for communications interception in 2013, exactly one involved kidnapping. And, more importantly, there’s no evidence that encryption hampers criminal investigations in any serious way. In 2013, encryption foiled the police nine times, up from four in 2012 — and the investigations proceeded in some other way.


The Snowden documentary shows that only government transparency can stop leaks | Trevor Timm | Comment is free | theguardian.com

The Snowden documentary shows that only government transparency can stop leaks | Trevor Timm | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

Edward Snowden’s leaks are not isolated incidents – or, at least they won’t be when we look back on this era 10 years from now

edward snowden pensive
Edward Snowden won’t be the last whistleblower. Photograph: Photo courtesy of The Guardian/EPA

Transparency is coming, whether the government likes it or not. The only question is whether they decide to bring it to the public before whistleblowers do it for them.

That’s the underlying message of Laura Poitras’ mesmerizing new documentary, Citizenfour about Edward Snowden and the National Security Agency that debuted at the New York Film Festival on Friday night.

Others have hinted in the past that the government better act fast to stem the tide of unnecessary secrecy or have a revolt on its hands. Shortly after the first Snowden leaks (which are chronicled in real-time in the film), journalist Glenn Greenwald told Newsweek:

“Government and businesses cannot function without enormous amounts of data, and many people have to have access to that data,” Greenwald says, adding that it only takes one person with access and an assaulted consciences to leak, no matter what controls are in place.

But during the enthralling second act of the film, where Poitras and Greenwald met a then-unknown Edward Snowden at his Hong Kong hotel, Snowden hints at how realistic that prediction would become.

As he talks to Poitras about the potential consequences of his actions on his own life, Snowden explains that he’s confident that the coming government pursuit of him will only encourage others. It’s like the internet principle of the Hydra, he says: “They can stomp me if they want to, but there will be seven more to take my place.”

In the dramatic conclusion of the film, Snowden learns on-camera Poitras and Greenwald now have a new source, who gave The Intercept information about the US government’s enormous “terrorism” watchlist. That watchlist, which contains 1.2 million names – most of which have no direct nexus to terrorism – is governed by Kafkaesque secrecy rules that were recently ruled unconstitutional (and which took another blow from a fed-up federal judge on Friday night).


US threatened Yahoo with $250,000 daily fine over NSA data refusal | World news | theguardian.com

US threatened Yahoo with $250,000 daily fine over NSA data refusal | World news | theguardian.com.

Company releases 1,500 documents from failed suit against NSA over user data requests and cooperation with Prism compliance

 

 

Yahoo in Geneva
Yahoo attempted to refuse user data to the NSA and filed suit in the secretive Fisa court. Photograph: DENIS BALIBOUSE/REUTERS

 

The US government threatened to fine Yahoo $250,000 a day if it refused to hand over user data to the National Security Agency, according to court documents unsealed Thursday.

 

In a blogpost, the company said the 1,500 pages of once-secret documents shine further light on Yahoo’s previously disclosed clash with the NSA over access to its users’ data.

 

The papers outline Yahoo’s secret and ultimately unsuccessful legal battle to resist the government’s demands for the tech firm to cooperate with the NSA’s controversial Prism surveillance program, revealed by whistleblower Edward Snowden last year.

 

“The released documents underscore how we had to fight every step of the way to challenge the US government’s surveillance efforts,” said company general counsel Ron Bell in a Tumblr post.

 

The US government amended a key law to demand user information from online services in 2007. When Yahoo was asked to hand over user data the company objected arguing the request was “unconstitutional and overbroad”.

 

Yahoo took its case to the foreign intelligence surveillance court, also known as the Fisa court, which oversees requests for surveillance orders in national security investigations. The secretive Fisa court provides the legal authorities that underpin the US government’s controversial surveillance programs. Yahoo lost its case, and an appeal.

 

Federal judge William Bryson, presiding judge of the foreign intelligence surveillance court of review, which reviews denials of applications for electronic surveillance warrants, unsealed the documents on Thursday.

 

Disclosures in the Guardian and the Washington Post about the Prism program, which was discontinued in 2011, prompted an international backlash over allegations of overreach in government surveillance and against the tech companies which cooperated with it.

 

“Despite the declassification and release, portions of the documents remain sealed and classified to this day, unknown even to our team. The released documents underscore how we had to fight every step of the way to challenge the US government’s surveillance efforts. At one point, the US government threatened the imposition of $250,000 in fines per day if we refused to comply,” wrote Bell.


Cómo es el 'Google' secreto de la NSA y cuáles son sus peligros

Cómo es el ‘Google’ secreto de la NSA y cuáles son sus peligros.


La última filtración de los “papeles de Snowden” revela la creación del buscador ICREACH para rastrear entre los metadatos espiados

La herramienta pudo servir para detenciones e interrogatorios de sospechosos

El anterior director de la NSA, Keith Alexander, ahora consultor privado, fue su promotor

Cárcel de Guantánamo. Foto: EFE

Aunque hace más de un año empezaron a salir a la luz las prácticas de espionaje masivo de la NSA con la publicación del rastreo de las llamadas de los usuarios de Verizon, el caso está lejos de cerrarse.

El último de los programas conocidos, revelado por “The Intercept” la semana pasada, es “ICREACH”, un buscador que la NSA habría desarrollado en secreto para rastrear entre miles de millones de metadatos obtenidos en sus actividades de espionaje indiscriminado.

Se trata, entre los sistemas de espionaje hasta ahora desvelados, de uno de los más graves por la cesión de millones de datos registrados a otras agencias como la CIA, el FBI o la DEA (que carecen del control y autorización excepcional con que supuestamente contaría la NSA), porquehabría servido para detenciones e interrogatorios a quienes se consideraban sospechosos “a la luz” del tratamiento de dichos metadatos.

Estas prácticas vulnerarían, tal como apuntaron enseguida las primeras reacciones, la Cuarta Enmienda de la Constitución norteamericana que establece que solo se podrá ser objeto de investigación o detención por causas “razonables”:

“El derecho de los habitantes de que sus personas, domicilios, papeles y efectos se hallen a salvo de pesquisas y aprehensiones arbitrarias, será inviolable, y no se expedirán al efecto mandamientos que no se apoyen en un motivo verosímil…”


ICREACH: How the NSA Built Its Own Secret Google -The Intercept

ICREACH: How the NSA Built Its Own Secret Google -The Intercept.

 

architecture
By 200

The National Security Agency is secretly providing data to nearly two dozen U.S. government agencies with a “Google-like” search engine built to share more than 850 billion records about phone calls, emails, cellphone locations, and internet chats, according to classified documents obtained by The Intercept.

The documents provide the first definitive evidence that the NSA has for years made massive amounts of surveillance data directly accessible to domestic law enforcement agencies. Planning documents for ICREACH, as the search engine is called, cite the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Drug Enforcement Administration as key participants.

ICREACH contains information on the private communications of foreigners and, it appears, millions of records on American citizens who have not been accused of any wrongdoing. Details about its existence are contained in the archive of materials provided to The Intercept by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden.

Earlier revelations sourced to the Snowden documents have exposed a multitude of NSA programs for collecting large volumes of communications. The NSA has acknowledged that it shares some of its collected data with domestic agencies like the FBI, but details about the method and scope of its sharing have remained shrouded in secrecy.


Microsoft ordered to give US customer e-mails stored abroad | Ars Technica

Microsoft ordered to give US customer e-mails stored abroad | Ars Technica.

Decision affirms US position that the world’s servers are for the taking.

Microsoft, Sandyford, Co. Dublin.

A federal judge ruled Thursday that Microsoft must hand over e-mails stored on an overseas server to US authorities. The case gives the Obama administration approval to reach into servers abroad.

“It is a question of control, not a question of the location of that information,” US District Judge Loretta Preska ruled in a closely followed legal flap. The bench order from the New York judge was stayed pending appeal.

The judge sided with the Obama Administration claims that any company with operations in the United States must comply with valid warrants for data, even if the content is stored overseas—in this case Dublin, Ireland. It’s a position Microsoft and companies like Apple contended was wrong, arguing that the enforcement of US law stops at the border.


CIA admits to spying on Senate staffers | World news | theguardian.com

CIA admits to spying on Senate staffers | World news | theguardian.com.

John Brennan issues apology after acknowledging that agency spied on Senate intelligence committee’s staff members

John Brennan
John Brennan: under fire. Photograph: Jason Reed/Reuters

The director of the Central Intelligence Agency, John Brennan, issued an extraordinary apology to leaders of the US Senate intelligence committee on Thursday, conceding that the agency employees spied on committee staff and reversing months of furious and public denials.

Brennan acknowledged that an internal investigation had found agency security personnel transgressed a firewall set up on a CIA network, which allowed Senate committee investigators to review agency documents for their landmark inquiry into CIA torture.


Meet the Muslim-American Leaders the FBI and NSA Have Been Spying On – The InterceptThe Intercept

Meet the Muslim-American Leaders the FBI and NSA Have Been Spying On – The InterceptThe Intercept.

By  and 

The National Security Agency and FBI have covertly monitored the emails of prominent Muslim-Americans—including a political candidate and several civil rights activists, academics, and lawyers—under secretive procedures intended to target terrorists and foreign spies.

According to documents provided by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, the list of Americans monitored by their own government includes:

• Faisal Gill, a longtime Republican Party operative and one-time candidate for public office who held a top-secret security clearance and served in the Department of Homeland Security under President George W. Bush;

• Asim Ghafoor, a prominent attorney who has represented clients in terrorism-related cases;

• Hooshang Amirahmadi, an Iranian-American professor of international relations at Rutgers University;

• Agha Saeed, a former political science professor at California State University who champions Muslim civil liberties and Palestinian rights;

• Nihad Awad, the executive director of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), the largest Muslim civil rights organization in the country.

The individuals appear on an NSA spreadsheet in the Snowden archives called “FISA recap”—short for the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. Under that law, the Justice Department must convince a judge with the top-secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court that there is probable cause to believe that American targets are not only agents of an international terrorist organization or other foreign power, but also “are or may be” engaged in or abetting espionage, sabotage, or terrorism. The authorizations must be renewed by the court, usually every 90 days for U.S. citizens.

The spreadsheet shows 7,485 email addresses listed as monitored between 2002 and 2008. Many of the email addresses on the list appear to belong to foreigners whom the government believes are linked to Al Qaeda, Hamas, and Hezbollah. Among the Americans on the list are individuals long accused of terrorist activity, including Anwar al-Awlaki and Samir Khan, who were killed in a 2011 drone strike in Yemen.

But a three-month investigation by The Intercept—including interviews with more than a dozen current and former federal law enforcement officials involved in the FISA process—reveals that in practice, the system for authorizing NSA surveillance affords the government wide latitude in spying on U.S. citizens.

The five Americans whose email accounts were monitored by the NSA and FBI have all led highly public, outwardly exemplary lives. All five vehemently deny any involvement in terrorism or espionage, and none advocates violent jihad or is known to have been implicated in any crime, despite years of intense scrutiny by the government and the press. Some have even climbed the ranks of the U.S. national security and foreign policy establishments.


Newly Obtained Emails Contradict Administration Claims on Guardian Laptop Destruction – The Intercept

Newly Obtained Emails Contradict Administration Claims on Guardian Laptop Destruction – The Intercept.

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Featured photo - Newly Obtained Emails Contradict Administration Claims on Guardian Laptop DestructionDocuments obtained from the Obama administration from an Associated Press FOIA request

On July 20, 2013, agents of the U.K. government entered The Guardian newsroom in London and compelled them to physically destroy the computers they were using to report on the Edward Snowden archive. The Guardian reported this a month later after my partner, David Miranda, was detained at Heathrow Airport for 11 hours under a British terrorism law and had all of his electronic equipment seized. At the time, the Obama administration—while admitting that it was told in advance of the Heathrow detention—pretended that it knew nothing about the forced laptop destruction and would never approve of such attacks on press freedom. From the August 20, 2013, press briefing by then-deputy White House press secretary Josh Earnest:

Q: A last one on the NSA—The Guardian newspaper, following on everything that was discussed yesterday—The Guardian is saying that British authorities destroyed several hard drives, because they wanted to keep secrets that Edward Snowden had leaked from actually getting out.  They were stored in The Guardian‘s—they had some hard drives there at their offices.  British authorities went in there and destroyed these hard drives. Did the American government get a heads up about that the way you did about the person being detained?

MR. EARNEST:  I’ve seen the published reports of those accusations, but I don’t have any information for you on that.

Q: And does the U.S. government think it’s appropriate for a government, especially one of our allies, to go in and destroy hard drives? Is that something this administration would do?

MR. EARNEST: The only thing I know about this are the public reports about this, so it’s hard for me to evaluate the propriety of what they did based on incomplete knowledge of what happened.

Q: But this administration would not do that, would not go into an American media company and destroy hard drives, even if it meant trying to protect national security, you don’t think?

MR. EARNEST: It’s very difficult to imagine a scenario in which that would be appropriate.

But emails just obtained by Associated Press pursuant to a Freedom of Information Act request (FOIA) prove that senior Obama national security officials— including Director of National Intelligence James Clapper and then-NSA chief Keith Alexander—not only knew in advance that U.K. officials intended to force The Guardian to destroy their computers, but overtly celebrated it.