Trump promulga ley que permite a empresas de internet vender datos de sus usuarios – El Mostrador

La norma, aprobada por la mayoría republicana en el Congreso la semana pasada, revoca un reglamento que los demócratas habían redactado para la Comisión Federal de Comunicaciones.

Fuente: Trump promulga ley que permite a empresas de internet vender datos de sus usuarios – El Mostrador


Privacy experts fear Donald Trump accessing global surveillance network | World news | The Guardian

Privacy activists, human rights campaigners and former US security officials have expressed fears over the prospect of Donald Trump gaining access to the vast global US and UK surveillance network.

Fuente: Privacy experts fear Donald Trump accessing global surveillance network | World news | The Guardian


China’s new cybersecurity law sparks fresh censorship and espionage fears | World news | The Guardian

Legislation raises concerns foreign companies may need to hand over intellectual property and help security agencies in return for market access

Fuente: China’s new cybersecurity law sparks fresh censorship and espionage fears | World news | The Guardian


Open Data Projects Are Fueling the Fight Against Police Misconduct

situation is beginning to change — as a growing number of police accountability groups are starting to bypass the departments by aggregating and distributing misconduct history databases on their own.

Fuente: Open Data Projects Are Fueling the Fight Against Police Misconduct


Brussels set to sign off on transatlantic data transfer rules – FT.com

The new deal, called Privacy Shield, will provide a legal means for businesses to transfer personal data online — whether payslips, pictures or healthcare data — to the US from the EU without falling foul of the bloc’s strict privacy laws.

Fuente: Brussels set to sign off on transatlantic data transfer rules – FT.com


La mitad de los ministros de telecomunicaciones europeos quiere que tus datos fluyan libremente

13 miembros de la UE, entre los que se encuentran Irlanda, Bélgica, Polonia, Suecia y Reino Unido se muestran partidarios de que los datos fluyan solo por territorio europeo

Fuente: La mitad de los ministros de telecomunicaciones europeos quiere que tus datos fluyan libremente


Tech start-up Dwolla fined $100,000 for cyber defence flaws – FT.com

A financial technology start-up has been fined $100,000 for deficiencies in its cyber defence systems in a sign that new online payment networks are facing tougher scrutiny from regulators.The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau on Wednesday handed its first penalty for data security shortcomings to Dwolla, an ecommerce company that is little more than five years old.

Fuente: Tech start-up Dwolla fined $100,000 for cyber defence flaws – FT.com


New Safe Harbor Data “Deal” May Be More Politicking Than Surveillance Reform

European privacy activists criticized a new Safe Harbor data agreement with the U.S. as a superficial political fix that fails to address NSA spying.

Fuente: New Safe Harbor Data “Deal” May Be More Politicking Than Surveillance Reform


The new way police are surveilling you: Calculating your threat ‘score’ – The Washington Post

Some local police departments scan social media, send drones aloft and monitor surveillance cameras.

Fuente: The new way police are surveilling you: Calculating your threat ‘score’ – The Washington Post


El TPP amenaza derechos humanos

En materia de comercio electrónico se obliga a los países a permitir la transferencia transfronteriza de información por medios electrónicos, aun cuando dicha información sea de carácter personal o sensible, sin la consideración de que dichos países cuenten con un nivel adecuado de protección de datos personales. Además, se supedita la protección de datos personales a los requerimientos del comercio internacional.

Fuente: El TPP amenaza derechos humanos


Google’s dominance faces a challenge at last. Shame it’s too late | Comment is free | The Guardian

Google’s dominance faces a challenge at last. Shame it’s too late | Comment is free | The Guardian.

Denmarks Economy Minister Margrethe Vest Taking on the search giant: EC competition commissioner Margrethe Vestager. Photograph: Keld Navntoft/AFP/Getty Images

So the European commission has finally decided that Google may have a case to answer in relation to claims that it has been abusing its monopoly position in search. On Thursday, Margrethe Vestager, the competition commissioner, announced that the preliminary findings of the commission’s investigation supported the claim that Google “systematically” gave prominence to its own ads, which amounted to an abuse of its dominant position in search. “I’m concerned,” she said, “that Google has artificially boosted its presence in the comparison shopping market with the result that consumers may not necessarily see what’s most relevant for them or that competitors may not get the commercial opportunity that their innovative services deserve.” Google, which, needless to say, disputes these claims, now has 10 weeks in which to respond.

To those of us who follow these things, the most interesting thing about Thursday’s announcement is the way it highlights the radical differences that are emerging between European and American attitudes to internet giants. The Wall Street Journal recently revealed that the US Federal Trade Commission had investigated similar claims about Google’s abuse of monopoly power in 2012 and that some of the agency’s staff had recommended charging the company with violating antitrust (unfair competition) laws. But in the end, the FTC backed off.

Now it turns out that its staff had been in regular communication with the European commission’s investigators in Brussels, which means that the Europeans knew what the Americans knew about Google’s activities. But the commission has acted, whereas the FTC did not. Why?

Leaving aside conspiracist explanations (eg that the American authorities don’t wish to enfeeble US companies that will ensure continued US economic hegemony in the digital era), the difference may be a reflection of the way in which antitrust law has been gradually infected by neoliberal ideology. Once upon a time, it was taken for granted that industrial monopolies were, by their very nature, intolerable for the simple reason that, as Lord Acton famously observed, power tends to corrupt and absolute power corrupts absolutely.

But then a radically different idea was injected into the legislative bloodstream by Robert Bork, a distinguished American lawyer, in his 1978 book, The Antitrust Paradox. One implication of Bork’s argument was that overwhelming market dominance was not necessarily a bad thing. Monopoly could be a reflection of a firm’s superior efficiency: we should expect truly exceptional firms to attract the majority of the customers, and so overzealous antitrust prosecutions could effectively punish excellence and thus disadvantage, rather than protect, consumers.


California judge rules against privacy advocate and protects police secrecy | World news | theguardian.com

California judge rules against privacy advocate and protects police secrecy | World news | theguardian.com.

Man loses bid to access to police license plate records in case with repercussions on surveillance and government databases

  • theguardian.com
Ronald Reagan Freeway  california
Expanding networks of cameras mounted on stoplights and police cars are collecting license plate scans across the US. Photograph: David McNew/Getty Images

A California judge’s initial ruling against a tech entrepreneur, who seeks access to records kept secret in government databases detailing the comings and goings of millions of cars in the San Diego area, via license plate scans, was the second legal setback within a month for privacy advocates.

The tentative decision issued Thursday upheld the right of authorities to block the public from viewing information collected on their vehicles, by way of vast networks that rely on cameras mounted on stoplights and police cars.

The rapidly expanding systems and their growing databases have been the subject of a larger debate pitting privacy rights against public safety concerns in a new frontier over high-tech surveillance. A Los Angeles judge ruled in August that city police and sheriff’s departments don’t have to disclose records from the 3m plates they scan each week.

Michael Robertson, best known for creating the music website MP3.com, stepped into the discussion with a personal lawsuit, asking for access to only his information. He will still get to present his case Friday, despite the initial ruling from San Diego Superior Court Judge Katherine Bacal that went against him.

The ACLU of southern California and the Electronic Frontier Foundation had been seeking a week’s worth of data from databases that hold hundreds of millions of scans.


Cámara aprueba acuerdo entre Chile y Estados Unidos que es requisito para Visa Waiver | Emol.com

Cámara aprueba acuerdo entre Chile y Estados Unidos que es requisito para Visa Waiver | Emol.com.

La iniciativa apunta al incremento de la cooperación en la prevención y combate del delito grave entre ambos países.

 

Cámara aprueba acuerdo entre Chile y Estados Unidos que es requisito para Visa Waiver
Foto: El Mercurio.

VALPARAÍSO.- Por 76 votos a favor, 17 en contra y 9 abstenciones, la Cámara de Diputados aprobó este miércoles el proyecto que ratifica el Acuerdo entre Chile y Estados Unidos en materia de incremento de la cooperación en la prevención y combate del delito grave, requisito para el programa Visa Waiver que permite a los chilenos viajar sin visa al país norteamericano.

Detalles del acuerdo
Según consta en el documento, Chile y Estados Unidos celebraron el acuerdo para permitir el intercambio recíproco de información en materia de datos personales y así prevenir e investigar hechos delictivos, en el marco de las negociaciones relativas al ingreso de Chile al Programa de Exención de Visa de la Administración estadounidense, conocido como Visa Waiver Program.
El informe especifica que este mecanismo especial autoriza el ingreso a los Estados Unidos de América sin necesidad de visa a los ciudadanos de países que mantienen una baja tasa de inmigración ilegal, con la finalidad de facilitar la movilidad de las personas, sea por motivos de turismo o de negocios, y cuya estadía no supere los 90 días.
El convenio establece un procedimiento que, una vez en vigencia, permitirá que Chile y Estados Unidos puedan compartir información de sus respectivas bases de datos para la prevención y combate de la actividad delictual.


La NSA recolecta millones de imágenes de rostros de personas en Internet | Internacional | EL PAÍS

La NSA recolecta millones de imágenes de rostros de personas en Internet | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

Logotipo de la NSA, en su sede a las afueras de Washington DC. / PATRICK SEMANSKY (AP)

El serial sobre los largos tentáculos de la Agencia Nacional de Seguridad sigue creciendo. La NSA intercepta millones de imágenes de rostros de personas que circulan por Internet y que utiliza para programas de reconocimiento facial con fines de inteligencia, según publicó este domingo el diario The New York Times a partir de documentos de 2011 sustraídos por el exanalista de la agencia Edward Snowden. Se trata de la primera filtración desde que el miércoles la cadena NBC emitiera la primera entrevista concedida por Snowden a un canal de televisión, en la que se consideró un patriota por destapar el espionaje masivo de Estados Unidos.

Hace unos meses el diario The Guardian ya publicó que la NSA y su equivalente británica habían interceptado imágenes de usuarios de Yahoo! tomadas desde las cámaras frontales de ordenadores. La información del Times va mucho más allá y revela una práctica muy extendida en los últimos cuatro años en marco de los esfuerzos de la NSA de sacar provecho al enorme flujo de fotografías que circulan en correos electrónicos, mensajes de texto, redes sociales o videoconferencias; y que considera igual de relevantes que otros métodos de espionaje, como el escrutinio de llamadas telefónicas.

En 2011 la agencia interceptaba “millones de imágenes al día”, incluyendo unas 55.000 de reconocimiento facial de calidad, que generan un “tremendo potencial sin explotar”, según un documento filtrado, que destaca la oportunidad que aporta de conocer la vida diaria y la biografía de determinados individuos. El diario deja entrever que la mayoría de imágenes corresponderían a ciudadanos extranjeros obtenidas a través de Internet, satélites y líneas de cables.


Gobierno chileno a punto de someter a sus ciudadanos a la vigilancia estadounidense | CIPER Chile CIPER Chile » Centro de Investigación e Información Periodística

Gobierno chileno a punto de someter a sus ciudadanos a la vigilancia estadounidense | CIPER Chile CIPER Chile » Centro de Investigación e Información Periodística.

usa-visa

Los beneficios económicos para Chile, de ser incluido en el Programa Visa Waiver (PVW) con Estados Unidos, son extraordinarios. La facilidad de viajar permite el intercambio de turistas entre los países, además de otras nuevas oportunidades económicas a través de la menor fricción producida por los procesos de aprobación de la visa. Sin embargo, este programa es usado con frecuencia como mecanismo para obtener más datos de los ciudadanos de los países participantes, por lo que la inclusión de Chile en el PVW pone en riesgo la privacidad de sus ciudadanos.

 

En la última década, el gobierno de Estados Unidos ha usado el Programa Visa Waiver (PVW) para ejercer presión sobre otros gobiernos para la entrega de datos de sus ciudadanos. De hecho, un país debe cumplir con ciertos requerimientos formales para poder ser elegible y participar en el PVW, en gran parte centrados en cómo los datos son compartidos entre los dos países. Esto es problemático debido a la bajísima protección legal que Estados Unidos entrega a estos datos. La regulación de privacidad de ese país es una de las más débiles en el mundo, particularmente porque la inmigración y la seguridad nacional son usadas como excepciones para contrarrestar incluso derechos fundamentales básicos. Lo que es aún más problemático es que la normativa de EE.UU. solamente protege a ciudadanos estadounidenses. Cualquier información enviada por el gobierno chileno no estaría protegida por el sistema norteamericano, que ya es débil. Cuando EE.UU. recibe datos sobre extranjeros, conserva habitualmente esta información en sus extensas bases de datos por 100 años.

 

Unirse al PVW significará que EE.UU. ahora tenga acceso a una gran cantidad de información personal de los chilenos. Esto plantea interrogantes en torno a cuál será la autoridad chilena responsable de decidir y gestionar la información compartida con EE.UU., la posibilidad de que el gobierno norteamericano comparta los datos con terceros, así como la eventual negativa arbitraria para ingresar a EE.UU. a causa de datos potencialmente erróneos en bases de datos chilenas. Un ciudadano chileno que es maltratado debido a estos datos erróneos no tendrá derecho a la reparación en virtud de la normativa de EE.UU., y sus datos continuarán residiendo en ese país sin ninguna capacidad real de apelación.

 

El PVW también exige a los países miembros adoptar un “pasaporte electrónico”. Su introducción en Chile probablemente implica el establecimiento por parte del gobierno chileno de una base de datos biométricos, incluyendo huellas dactilares de una persona, nombres, sexo, fecha y lugar de nacimiento, nacionalidad y número de pasaporte. Incluso datos más sensibles podrían ser incluidos. La falta de una mejor ley de datos personales en Chile significa que los ciudadanos no tienen protecciones legales reales para asegurar que los datos sean exactos, que no sean utilizados para otros propósitos, y que no sean compartidos con otros departamentos o gobiernos.


Visa Waiver e intercambio de datos personales: ¿Vale la pena firmar en estas condiciones? – ONG Derechos Digitales

Visa Waiver e intercambio de datos personales: ¿Vale la pena firmar en estas condiciones? – ONG Derechos Digitales.


La tra­mi­ta­ción del lla­ma­do “acuer­do de Visa Wai­ver” en la Cá­ma­ra de Dipu­tados ha ge­ne­ra­do po­lé­mi­ca por la crí­ti­ca pú­bli­ca hecha por un grupo de par­la­men­ta­rios y su re­cha­zo a apro­bar­lo. Quie­nes lo apo­yan acu­san pre­jui­cios, des­in­for­ma­ción y ase­gu­ran que no hay ries­go. Sin em­bar­go, las dudas están lejos de ser des­pe­ja­das.

leyendaAnte la le­gí­ti­ma preo­cu­pa­ción por un nuevo con­jun­to de re­glas que per­mi­te el trá­fi­co in­ter­na­cio­nal de datos per­so­na­les, la apro­ba­ción de un acuer­do de coope­ra­ción con Es­ta­dos Uni­dos es in­cier­ta.

El mundo po­lí­ti­co chi­leno se ha di­vi­di­do ante la even­tual apro­ba­ción de un acuer­do de coope­ra­ción con Es­ta­dos Uni­dos, que con­sis­te en el in­ter­cam­bio de in­for­ma­ción para la pre­ven­ción e in­ves­ti­ga­ción de de­li­tos gra­ves, ya fir­ma­do por el Go­bierno de Se­bas­tián Pi­ñe­ra.

Pero ante la le­gí­ti­ma preo­cu­pa­ción por un nuevo con­jun­to de re­glas que per­mi­te el trá­fi­co in­ter­na­cio­nal de datos per­so­na­les, sin antes es­ta­ble­cer res­guar­dos ade­cua­dos a los mis­mos, pa­re­ce ne­ce­sa­rio re­cor­dar, una vez más, por qué acep­tar estas con­di­cio­nes es ries­go­so para los de­re­chos de las per­so­nas.


Gobierno aboga por más transparencia en las negociaciones del TPP: buenas noticias y nuevos escenarios | Manzana Mecánica

Gobierno aboga por más transparencia en las negociaciones del TPP: buenas noticias y nuevos escenarios | Manzana Mecánica.

Carolina Gainza »

 

Habíamos expuesto en artículos anteriores el grave problema de acceso a las negociaciones del TPP, donde el Gobierno de Sebastián Piñera había manejado con reserva las negociaciones y además señaló su compromiso con la firma del acuerdo. Varias organizaciones sociales y algunos sectores del Congreso expresaron su rechazo frente a este secretismo, e incluso algunos de los documentos provenientes de tales negociaciones fueron filtradas por Wikileaks el año pasado. Y entrando en nuevo escenario, algo que afectará las negociaciones chilenas sería su nueva clasificación como “país desarrollado”.


Reguladora de EEUU advierte a Facebook y WhatsApp sobre uso de datos privados

Jan Persiel (cc)Jan Persiel (cc)

Publicado por Gabriela Ulloa | La Información es de Agencia AFP

La Comisión Federal de Comercio estadounidense, encargada de la competencia y de proteger a consumidores (FTC), advirtió a la red social Facebook contra un mal uso de los datos personales de los usuarios de su futura filial de mensajería móvil WhatsApp.

Facebook anunció en febrero que compraría WhatsApp por 19.000 millones de dólares. El sistema de mensajería por celular, que posee unos 450 millones de usuarios, carece de publicidad y no recupera datos de usuarios, contrariamente a Facebook.

“WhatsApp hizo una cierta cantidad de promesas” que “superan las protecciones hoy otorgadas a los usuarios de Facebook”, recuerda Jessica Rich, quien encabeza la oficina de protección de consumidores de la FTC en una carta que hizo pública y fue enviada a Facebook y WhatsApp. “Independientemente de la compra, WhatsApp debe seguir cumpliendo con sus promesas”.


"Visa Waiver": ¿son nuestros datos personales el precio de la integración? – ONG Derechos Digitales

“Visa Waiver”: ¿son nuestros datos personales el precio de la integración? – ONG Derechos Digitales.

03 de abril, 2014

A partir de esta semana es posible viajar desde Chile a EE. UU. sin necesidad de una visa. ¿Implica este beneficio renunciar a nuestros derechos?  ¿Son nuestros datos personales una moneda de cambio para obtener “privilegios” en otro país?

Para lograr  exención de visa, el gobierno de Sebastián Piñera envió un proyecto de ley que facilita el intercambio de datos personales entre Chile y Estados Unidos BY (US Embassy Santiago) -NC - SA Para lograr exención de visa, el gobierno de Sebastián Piñera envió un proyecto de ley que facilita el intercambio de datos personales entre Chile y Estados Unidos BY (US Embassy Santiago) -NC – SA

Según cifras oficiales, más de 240 mil personas viajaron a Estados Unidos en 2013. Se espera que esa cifra aumente un 30%, tras la entrada en vigencia de la “Visa Waiver”, que permite a los ciudadanos chilenos viajar con la exención de visa.

Los requisitos que Chile debió cumplir para integrar el selecto club son conocidos: baja tasa de rechazo de visas, implementación del pasaporte electrónico, creación de un registro de pasaportes denunciados por robo. Pero también compartir información de seguridad, aumentar el control de fronteras y suscribir un acuerdo de cooperación en la prevención de delitos graves1.

Para cumplir con estos requerimientos, el gobierno de Sebastián Piñera envió un proyecto de ley que facilita el intercambio recíproco de información con otros países. Estos nuevos estatutos cambiarían significativamente la regulación de los datos personales en Chile. Pero no en un sentido de protección, sino al contrario, pues el tratado exige intercambio de información, incluso más allá de las restricciones legales.

Estas modificaciones legales intentan legitimar la entrega de datos personales ante la simple solicitud de “organismos gubernamentales” extranjeros, justificando el envío de datos entre Estados en virtud de un  simple tratado.

Las modificaciones que quieren introducirse harían más sencillo el intercambio de datos personales entre países. BY (grayhex/) NC - SALas modificaciones que quieren introducirse harían más sencillo el intercambio de datos personales entre países. BY (grayhex) NC – SA

En otras palabras, se facilitaría la entrega de datos personales de chilenos sin mecanismos de control relacionados con la transferencia internacional de datos, ni una ley expresa que lo regule. Esto significaría que estaríamos entregando datos al gobierno de Estados Unidos sin control judicial. Dado que los ciudadanos estadounidenses no requieren visa para venir a Chile, cabe preguntarse si su gobierno entregará datos de sus ciudadanos con la misma facilidad.


Reports of the Death of a National License-Plate Tracking Database Have Been Greatly Exaggerated – The Intercept

Reports of the Death of a National License-Plate Tracking Database Have Been Greatly Exaggerated – The Intercept.

By 
Featured photo - Reports of the Death of a National License-Plate Tracking Database Have Been Greatly ExaggeratedScreengrab from Vigilant Solutions YouTube demo of its location-tracking service.

In a  February 19 front-page story, the Washington Post appeared to be breaking news of yet another massive federal surveillance program invading the privacy of innocent Americans.

The Department of Homeland Security, the story said, had drawn up plans to develop a national license-plate tracking database, giving the feds the ability to monitor the movements of tens of millions of drivers — a particularly intrusive form of suspicionless bulk surveillance, considering how strongly we Americans feel it’s none of the government’s business where and when we come and go.

The next day, however, the Post called off the alarm. The plan, the newspaper reported, had been canceled. Threat averted. Move along.

But the Post had gotten it all wrong. DHS wasn’t planning to create a national license-plate tracking database — because several already exist, owned by different private companies, and extensively used by law enforcement agencies including DHS for years.

The only thing actually new at DHS — the solicitation for services the Post decided was front-page news — was a different form of paperwork to pay for access.

And far from going away, the databases are growing at a furious pace due to rapidly improving technology and ample federal grant money for more cameras and more computers. Tens if not hundreds of millions of observations per month are streaming into bulging electronic archives, often remaining there indefinitely, for a vast array of clients in both the public and private sector.

So rather than being the tale of an averted threat, the bulk license-plate tracking saga is actually a story about yet another previously unimaginable loss of privacy in the modern information age.


Europa y Estados Unidos reanudan negociaciones comerciales a pesar de escándalo por espionaje – BioBioChile

Europa y Estados Unidos reanudan negociaciones comerciales a pesar de escándalo por espionaje – BioBioChile.

 

Imagen de Archivo | KP M (cc)Imagen de Archivo | KP M (cc)

Publicado por Alberto Gonzalez | La Información es de Agencia AFP

La Unión Europea y Estados Unidos reanudan este lunes las negociaciones para crear la zona libre comercio más grande del mundo a pesar de las revelaciones sobre el espionaje estadounidense a sus aliados europeos.

Esta segunda ronda de negociaciones del Acuerdo Transatlántico sobre Comercio e Inversión (ATCI) durará hasta el viernes. Medio centenar de funcionarios estadounidenses viajarán a Bruselas para reunirse con sus homólogos europeos.

El encuentro debía celebrarse en octubre pero se aplazó por el cierre de la administración en Estados Unidos.

Desde entonces, y en paralelo, las revelaciones del espionaje estadounidense que desde antes del verano socavan la confianza entre Washington y sus aliados, aumentaron con estridencia al divulgarse que los servicios de inteligencia de Estados Unidos habían puesto bajo escucha telefónica a al menos a 35 mandatarios, entre ellos la jefa del gobierno alemán Angela Merkel, así como a millones de ciudadanos europeos.

“El espionaje no es algo que evocaremos en el ATCI”, indicó la semana pasada un funcionario europeo con acceso a las negociaciones, aunque reconoció que el “tema de la confianza se ha planteado”.

Frente a esta situación los europeos no quieren retroceder en lo que califican de “línea roja”: la protección de datos personales. Uno de los temores es que se incluya en las negociaciones la transferencia de datos personales, que podrían ser explotados con fines comerciales por los gigantes de Internet estadounidenses.

Este tema “podría hacer descarrilar las negociaciones”, indicó recientemente la comisaria europea de Justicia, Viviane Reding, en una visita a Washington.


Bruselas revisará el gran acuerdo de intercambio de datos con EE UU

http://internacional.elpais.com/internacional/2013/07/19/actualidad/1374224441_656301.html

Francia y Alemania piden acelerar la norma europea de protección de datos

La vicepresidenta de la Comisión Europea y comisaria de Justicia, Viviane Reding y el comisario de Fiscalidad, Auditoría y Lucha contra el Fraude, Algirdas Semeta en conferencia en la sede de la Comisión Europea en Bruselas el17 de julio. / OLIVIER HOSLET (EFE)

La Unión Europea cree que el gran acuerdo de intercambio de datos con Estados Unidos no es tan seguro como parecía. La vicepresidenta de la Comisión Europea y responsable de Justicia, Viviane Reding, ha adelantado a este diario que ha decidido revisarlo, una iniciativa que posteriormente  ha comunicado hoy mismo a los Estados miembros.


Presidente de Twitter dijo seguir política de “principios” ante solicitud de datos

Jueves 27 junio 2013 | 10:07 · Actualizado: 10:07
Publicado por Denisse Charpentier | La Información es de Agencia AFP · 57 visitas
Imagen:Joi Ito (CC)Imagen: Joi Ito (CC)

Twitter sigue una política “de principios” con respecto a la solicitud de datos en materia de seguridad nacional y en algunos casos “la rechazará” para proteger la privacidad de sus usuarios, dijo su presidente ejecutivo, Dick Costolo.


Megaupload y la mayor masacre de datos de la historia de Internet

http://www.publico.es/457529/megaupload-y-la-mayor-masacre-de-datos-de-la-historia-de-internet

La empresa LeaseWeb borra los datos de 690 servidores del portal de descargas, que incluyen millones de archivos de usuarios y documentos personales de su propietario que, asegura, son evidencias para su defensa

EFE SIDNEY 20/06/2013 12:00 Actualizado: 20/06/2013 12:26

Kim Dotcom en una imagen de archivo.

Kim Dotcom en una imagen de archivo.

El informático alemán Kim Dotcom sugirió hoy que la eliminación de millones de archivos de su clausurado portal Megaupload beneficia a las autoridades estadounidenses en el proceso de extradición por supuesta piratería. “El FBI ha confiscado todos mis archivos y todavía no me dan una copia. Ahora mis archivos de seguridad de Megaupload desaparecieron. ¡Qué conveniente!”, ironizó en Twitter Dotcom, que se encuentra en libertad condicional en Nueva Zelanda.


Internet, demasiado grande para las agencias de inteligencia

/http://www.elmostrador.cl/vida-en-linea/2013/06/12/internet-demasiado-grande-para-las-agencias-de-inteligencia

12 de Junio de 2013

El 90% de los datos en internet fue subida durante los últimos dos años. Un problema real para las agencias de inteligencia, incapaces de almacenar y procesar tantos datos. ¿La solución? Metadatos proveídos por empresas.

por 

Tras el escándalo desatado por la revelación de PRISM, el programa ultrasecreto del gobierno estadounidense para vigilar las comunicaciones de sus ciudadanos, el poder de los servicios de inteligencia para acceder a cantidades masivas de información online ha estado en el centro del debate.

 


Twitter apela decisión de justicia de EEUU que lo obliga a revelar datos de uno de sus usuarios

http://rbb.cl/3g7p

Martes 28 agosto 2012 | 8:42
Publicado por Denisse Charpentier | La Información es de Agencia AFP · 215 visitas
Imagen:Andy Melton (CC)Imagen: Andy Melton (CC)

Twitter apeló este lunes una decisión de la justicia estadounidense que obliga a la red social a comunicar datos sobre uno de sus usuarios implicado en las manifestaciones del movimiento Occupy Wall Street, en un caso susceptible de crear jurispridencia en lo relativo a la libertad de expresión en línea.