NYU Accidentally Exposed Military Code-breaking Computer Project to Entire Internet

The supercomputer described in the trove, “WindsorGreen,” was a system designed to excel at the sort of complex mathematics that underlies encryption, the technology that keeps data private, and almost certainly intended for use by the Defense Department’s signals intelligence wing, the National Security Agency. WindsorGreen was the successor to another password-cracking machine used by the NSA, “WindsorBlue,” which was also documented in the material leaked from NYU and which had been previously described in the Norwegian press thanks to a document provided by National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden. Both systems were intended for use by the Pentagon and a select few other Western governments, including Canada and Norway.

Fuente: NYU Accidentally Exposed Military Code-breaking Computer Project to Entire Internet


Half of US adults are recorded in police facial recognition databases, study says | World news | The Guardian

More than 117 million adults included in ‘virtual, perpetual lineup’, which authorities can use to track citizens, raising concerns over privacy and profiling

Fuente: Half of US adults are recorded in police facial recognition databases, study says | World news | The Guardian


Estados Unidos presiona por desaparición de sitios que divulgan conocimiento científico gratuitamente | Manzana Mecánica

Estados Unidos ordenó el cese de actividades que permitan la distribución de material bajo derechos de autor de la editorial Elsevier. No obstante, la colaboración y organización continúa

Fuente: Estados Unidos presiona por desaparición de sitios que divulgan conocimiento científico gratuitamente | Manzana Mecánica


Califican de cosméticas las reformas de Obama a la NSA

ARGENPRESS.info – Prensa argentina para todo el mundo: Califican de cosméticas las reformas de Obama a la NSA.

Las reformas a la Agencia de Seguridad Nacional (NSA) anunciadas por el presidente estadounidense, Barack Obama, constituyen solo cambios cosméticos a esa entidad de espionaje, asegura hoy un artículo de la institución académica canadiense Global Research.

El plan es apenas un intento calculado para calmar el furor de los ciudadanos norteamericanos y de otros países contra las actividades de vigilancia de Washington en todo el mundo, agrega el documento publicado en la página digital de la organización.


The NSA's next move: silencing university professors? | Jay Rosen | Comment is free | theguardian.com

The NSA’s next move: silencing university professors? | Jay Rosen | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

A Johns Hopkins computer science professor blogs on the NSA and is asked to take it down. I fear for academic freedom

 

 

 

A computer user is silhouetted with a row of computer monitors at an internet cafe in China

On 9 September, Johns Hopkins University asked one of its professors to take down a blog post on the NSA. Photograph: AP

 

This actually happened yesterday:

A professor in the computer science department at Johns Hopkins, a leading American university, had written a post on his blog, hosted on the university’s servers, focused on his area of expertise, which is cryptography. The post was highly critical of the government, specifically the National Security Agency, whose reckless behavior in attacking online security astonished him.

Professor Matthew Green wrote on 5 September:

I was totally unprepared for today’s bombshell revelations describing the NSA’s efforts to defeat encryption. Not only does the worst possible hypothetical I discussed appear to be true, but it’s true on a scale I couldn’t even imagine.

The post was widely circulated online because it is about the sense of betrayal within a community of technical people who had often collaborated with the government. (I linked to it myself.)

On Monday, he gets a note from the acting dean of the engineering school asking him to take the post down and stop using the NSA logo as clip art in his posts. The email also informs him that if he resists he will need a lawyer. The professor runs two versions of the same site: one hosted on the university’s servers, one on Google’s blogger.com service. He tells the dean that he will take down the site mirrored on the university’s system but not the one on blogger.com. He also removes the NSA logo from the post.