Trump’s CIA Director Pompeo, Targeting WikiLeaks, Explicitly Threatens Speech and Press Freedoms

“To give them the space to crush us with misappropriated secrets is a perversion of what our great Constitution stands for. It ends now.” At no point did Pompeo specify what steps the CIA intended to take to ensure that the “space” to publish secrets “ends now.”

Fuente: Trump’s CIA Director Pompeo, Targeting WikiLeaks, Explicitly Threatens Speech and Press Freedoms


China’s new cybersecurity law sparks fresh censorship and espionage fears | World news | The Guardian

Legislation raises concerns foreign companies may need to hand over intellectual property and help security agencies in return for market access

Fuente: China’s new cybersecurity law sparks fresh censorship and espionage fears | World news | The Guardian


China’s scary lesson to the world: Censoring the Internet works – The Washington Post

BEHIND THE FIREWALL: How China tamed the Internet | This is part of a series examining the impact of China’s Great Firewall, a mechanism of Internet censorship and surveillance that affects nearly 700 million users.

Fuente: China’s scary lesson to the world: Censoring the Internet works – The Washington Post


Facebook, Snapchat and Twitter must play by tough rules for kids – FT.com

“Can I download Snapchat, Mum?” A conversation like this will play out in households with teenage children who use the messaging app across the EU when new rules requiring social networks to get parental consent from all users under the age of 16

Fuente: Facebook, Snapchat and Twitter must play by tough rules for kids – FT.com


Microsoft Says U.S. Is Abusing Secret Warrants

“WE APPRECIATE THAT there are times when secrecy around a government warrant is needed,” Microsoft President Brad Smith wrote in a blog post on Thursday. “But based on the many secrecy orders we have received, we question whether these orders are grounded in specific facts that truly demand secrecy. To the contrary, it appears that the issuance of secrecy orders has become too routine.”With those words, Smith announced that Microsoft was suing the Department of Justice for the right to inform its customers when the government is reading their emails.

Fuente: Microsoft Says U.S. Is Abusing Secret Warrants


Twitter cancela 125.000 cuentas relacionadas con ISIS | Tecnología | EL PAÍS

El Gobierno de Estados Unidos trabaja con la compañía, y con Google y Facebook, para frenar los mensajes de difusión de terrorismo

Fuente: Twitter cancela 125.000 cuentas relacionadas con ISIS | Tecnología | EL PAÍS


Those Demanding Free Speech Limits to Fight ISIS Pose a Greater Threat to U.S. Than ISIS

We’ve been told for years that The Terrorists “hate our freedoms,” yet we cannot seem to rid ourselves of those who think the solution is to voluntarily abolish those freedoms ourselves.

Fuente: Those Demanding Free Speech Limits to Fight ISIS Pose a Greater Threat to U.S. Than ISIS


The Snowden documentary shows that only government transparency can stop leaks | Trevor Timm | Comment is free | theguardian.com

The Snowden documentary shows that only government transparency can stop leaks | Trevor Timm | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

Edward Snowden’s leaks are not isolated incidents – or, at least they won’t be when we look back on this era 10 years from now

edward snowden pensive
Edward Snowden won’t be the last whistleblower. Photograph: Photo courtesy of The Guardian/EPA

Transparency is coming, whether the government likes it or not. The only question is whether they decide to bring it to the public before whistleblowers do it for them.

That’s the underlying message of Laura Poitras’ mesmerizing new documentary, Citizenfour about Edward Snowden and the National Security Agency that debuted at the New York Film Festival on Friday night.

Others have hinted in the past that the government better act fast to stem the tide of unnecessary secrecy or have a revolt on its hands. Shortly after the first Snowden leaks (which are chronicled in real-time in the film), journalist Glenn Greenwald told Newsweek:

“Government and businesses cannot function without enormous amounts of data, and many people have to have access to that data,” Greenwald says, adding that it only takes one person with access and an assaulted consciences to leak, no matter what controls are in place.

But during the enthralling second act of the film, where Poitras and Greenwald met a then-unknown Edward Snowden at his Hong Kong hotel, Snowden hints at how realistic that prediction would become.

As he talks to Poitras about the potential consequences of his actions on his own life, Snowden explains that he’s confident that the coming government pursuit of him will only encourage others. It’s like the internet principle of the Hydra, he says: “They can stomp me if they want to, but there will be seven more to take my place.”

In the dramatic conclusion of the film, Snowden learns on-camera Poitras and Greenwald now have a new source, who gave The Intercept information about the US government’s enormous “terrorism” watchlist. That watchlist, which contains 1.2 million names – most of which have no direct nexus to terrorism – is governed by Kafkaesque secrecy rules that were recently ruled unconstitutional (and which took another blow from a fed-up federal judge on Friday night).


James Foley and the daily horrors of the internet: think hard before clicking | James Ball | Comment is free | theguardian.com

James Foley and the daily horrors of the internet: think hard before clicking | James Ball | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

Outcry over footage of Foley’s apparent beheading raises difficult questions about editorial ethics – and our own choices

 

 

James Foley in Syria in 2012
James Foley in 2012. In a statement on his Facebook page, his mother said: ‘We have never been prouder of our son Jim. He gave his life trying to expose the world to the suffering of the Syrian people.’ Photograph: Nicole Tung/AP

 

With depressing frequency in this summer of diverse horrors, we hear tales of desperate human misery, suffering and depravity – and because we live now in an era where virtually every phone is a globally connected camera, we are confronted with graphic evidence of tragedy.

 

The footage of the apparent beheading (to refer to the atrocity as an execution serves only to lend a veneer of dignity to barbarism) of the US photojournalist James Foley at the hands of a British Isis extremist has raised particularly strong feelings.

 

Social networks are banning users who share the footage. Newspapers are facing opprobrium for the choices they make in showing stills or parts of the video. Others, of course, will seek out the video after seeing the row, or else post it around the internet in a juvenile form of the free speech argument.

 

Before considering the rights and wrongs of the position, there is one fact we should face: we are presented with images of grotesque violence on a daily basis. Last month the New York Times ran on its front page the dead and broken body of a Palestinian child.

 

Like Foley, that child was someone’s son, someone’s brother, someone’s friend, and in a connected world there is just as much chance his family saw the photo and its spread as Foley’s will see the latest awful images of their loved one.

 

That photo raised little controversy in comparison to the use of images of Foley. Photos of groups of civilian men massacred by Isis across Iraq and Syria – widely shared on social media and used by publications across the world – caused no outcry whatsoever.

 

It’s hard to look at that and not see a double standard: like many other courageous and talented people, Foley had chosen to travel to the region, and knew the risks that entailed. Others were killed simply fleeing their homes. In a strange and bitter irony, one of the duties of photographers such as Foley is documenting bloodshed in order to show the world.

 

To see an outcry for Foley’s video and not for others is to wonder whether we are disproportionately concerned over showing graphic deaths of white westerners – maybe even white journalists – and not others.


Twitter suspende cuentas que compartan fotos de periodista decapitado – BioBioChile

Twitter suspende cuentas que compartan fotos de periodista decapitado – BioBioChile.


Foto de archivo de James Foley | AFP PHOTO / ARIS MESSINIS

Foto de archivo de James Foley | AFP PHOTO / ARIS MESSINIS

Publicado por Eduardo Woo
Twitter se encuentra eliminando las fotos que circulan sobre la decapitación del periodistas estadounidense, James Foley, luego que fuera liberado un video con las grotescas imágenes en la que se ve la acción ejecutada por un yihadista presuntamente británico del Estado Islámico, grupo islamista ultrarradical que opera en Siria e Irak.

El presidente de Twitter, Dick Costolo, indicó a través de su cuenta que la compañía se encuentra suspendiendo las cuentas que estén viralizando ese contenido.


What Happens to #Ferguson Affects Ferguson: — The Message — Medium

What Happens to #Ferguson Affects Ferguson: — The Message — Medium.

Net Neutrality, Algorithmic Filtering and Ferguson

View image on Twitter

Ferguson is about many things, starting first with race and policing in America.

But it’s also about internet, net neutrality and algorithmic filtering.

It’s a clear example of why “saving the Internet”, as it often phrased, is not an abstract issue of concern only to nerds, Silicon Valley bosses, and few NGOs. It’s why “algorithmic filtering” is not a vague concern.

It’s a clear example why net neutrality is a human rights issue; a free speech issue; and an issue of the voiceless being heard, on their own terms.

I saw this play out in multiple countries — my home country of Turkey included — but last night, it became even more heartbreakingly apparent in the United States as well.

For me, last night’s Ferguson “coverage” began when people started retweeting pictures of armored vehicles with heavily armored “robocops” on top of them, aiming their muzzle at the protesters, who seemed to number a few hundred. It was the fourth night after an unarmed black man, Michael Brown, was shot by a — still unnamed — police officer after a “jaywalking” incident. Witnesses say he died hands in the air, saying “don’t shoot”.

Ferguson is about many things, starting first with race and policing in America.

But it’s also about internet, net neutrality and algorithmic filtering.

It’s a clear example of why “saving the Internet”, as it often phrased, is not an abstract issue of concern only to nerds, Silicon Valley bosses, and few NGOs. It’s why “algorithmic filtering” is not a vague concern.

It’s a clear example why net neutrality is a human rights issue; a free speech issue; and an issue of the voiceless being heard, on their own terms.

I saw this play out in multiple countries — my home country of Turkey included — but last night, it became even more heartbreakingly apparent in the United States as well.

For me, last night’s Ferguson “coverage” began when people started retweeting pictures of armored vehicles with heavily armored “robocops” on top of them, aiming their muzzle at the protesters, who seemed to number a few hundred. It was the fourth night after an unarmed black man, Michael Brown, was shot by a — still unnamed — police officer after a “jaywalking” incident. Witnesses say he died hands in the air, saying “don’t shoot”.


Cory Doctorow novel pulled from school reading for 'questioning authority' | Books | theguardian.com

Cory Doctorow novel pulled from school reading for ‘questioning authority’ | Books | theguardian.com.

Little Brother has been dropped from Florida high school programme over fears parents might object

 

 

Cory Doctorow

‘The book was being challenged because of its politics and its content’ … Cory Doctorow. Photograph: Will Ireland/Future Publishi/Rex

 

Little Brother, Cory Doctorow’s novel about teenagers rebelling against the surveillance state, has been pulled from a school reading programme in Florida this summer following what the author said were concerns from the school’s principal over its questioning of authority and its “lauding” of hacker culture.

According to the National Coalition Against Censorship, Little Brother was chosen for a school-wide summer reading programme at Booker T Washington High School in Pensacola, Florida “after an extensive process by the professional staff”. It has subsequently been withdrawn “because of concerns that some parents might object to scenes involving sex and violence and the idea of questioning authority”, said the American free speech organisation. Doctorow wrote on his blog Boingboing that the principal, Dr Michael Roberts, “cited reviews that emphasised the book’s positive view of questioning authority, lauding ‘hacker culture’, and discussing sex and sexuality in passing … In short, he made it clear that the book was being challenged because of its politics and its content.”

Doctorow’s publisher Tor has now sent 200 free copies of the novel to the school, and the novelist told the Guardian that he hoped its head teacher would change his mind about his decision. “As the son of two state-school teachers, I know that most career educators have the best interests of their students at heart. I presume that the principal is a good person, but I think he’s wrong about this,” said Doctorow.


Michelle Obama in China: internet freedom should be universal right | World news | theguardian.com

Michelle Obama in China: internet freedom should be universal right | World news | theguardian.com.

First lady spoke to students at Peking University during a week-long trip in China aimed at promoting educational exchanges

Michelle Obama in china
Michelle Obama takes pictures with students after delivering a speech at at Peking University. Photograph: Feng Li/Getty Images

Michelle Obama on Saturday told students in China, which has some of the world’s tightest restrictions on the internet, that freedom of speech and unfettered access to information make countries stronger and should be universal rights.

The first lady was speaking Saturday at Peking University in Beijing during a week-long trip aimed at promoting educational exchanges between the US and China. The trip also took on political overtones when she was granted a previously unscheduled meeting with Chinese president Xi Jinping on Friday.

Mrs Obama said the free flow of information is crucial “because that’s how we discover truth, that’s how we learn what’s really happening in our communities and our country and our world”.

“And that’s how we decide which values and ideas we think are best by questioning and debating them vigorously, by listening to all sides of every argument and by judging for ourselves,” she said.

China blocks many foreign news sites and social media services such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. Its army of censors routinely filters out information deemed offensive by the government and silences dissenting voices.

Though not likely to be well-received by the government, Mrs Obama’s remarks may not draw any strong protest because her speech and a subsequent moderated discussion among 50 students sitting in two identical conference rooms in Beijing and Palo Alto, California but connected via modern technology focused mainly on the value of educational exchanges.

Fulbright scholar Eleanor Goodman from Harvard University’s Fairbanks Center for East Asian Research said the first lady probably “felt a need to make that statement”.

“It was firm but not overbearing,” Goodman said.

Sunny Ni, a Chinese student studying environmentalism at the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry, said that she has no problem accessing information for her studies, and that China is improving with free flow of information.


Google wins legal fight over plan to scan world’s books – FT.com

Google wins legal fight over plan to scan world’s books – FT.com.

Ts&Cs and Copyright Policy for more detail. Email ftsales.support@ft.com to buy additional rights. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/f1bbda4a-4d50-11e3-a220-00144feabdc0.html#ixzz2keoRhgAR

The Google Books app is shown at Google Headquarters in Mountain View...The Google Books app is shown on Google's latest version of the Android operating system at Google Headquarters in Mountain View, California in this file photo taken February 2, 2011. Google Inc on Thursday won dismissal of a long-running lawsuit by authors who accused the Internet search company of digitally copying millions of books for a huge online library without permission. REUTERS/Beck Diefenbach/Files (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY MEDIA)©Reuters

Google has won a long-running lawsuit over its ambitious plan to scan and index all the world’s books, removing a question over its right to display small extracts of text in response to search queries.

Judge Denny Chin, the New York federal court judge who has presided over the case since it was launched eight years ago, ruled that Google’s display of snippets from books was protected under “fair use” provisions that allow limited use of copyrighted material. The decision clears one of the remaining legal questions surrounding a project, launched in 2004, that came to symbolise Google’s approach to opening internet access to more information.

The brainchild of co-founder Larry Page – who also designed a high-speed scanner for the task – the project has so far led to the digitisation of more than 20m books held in library vaults. The plan became a focal point for media industry complaints that Google was profiting unfairly from copyrighted material.

The case was brought by the US Authors Guild on behalf of its members but was temporarily suspended in 2008 after Google reached a tentative settlement with authors and a group of large publishers to resolve a number of claims. However, Judge Chin rejected the settlement in 2011 after complaints that it contravened the rights of publishers and authors outside the US and a warning from the Department of Justice that it might be anti-competitive.

Lawyers for the guild had argued that if internet users could search for extracts of books, they were less likely to buy the complete works. The judge sided instead with Google’s argument that readers were highly unlikely to be able to assemble enough snippets through internet searches to make a book purchase unnecessary.

The judge ruled on Thursday that “all society benefits” from the book scanning – from the librarians and researchers who have come to rely on it as an essential tool, to readers.

“In this day and age of online shopping, there can be no doubt but that Google Books improves book sales,” the judge said.

“The judge understood that this whole project is tremendously beneficial to the public,” said Corynne McSherry, intellectual property director at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, which along with the American Libraries Association filed a brief with the court in support of Google.

Google last year settled a separate case over its book scanning brought by a group of publishers including Pearson, owner of the Financial Times. It still faces a complaint from a trade group representing photographers.


How to foil NSA sabotage: use a dead man's switch | Technology | theguardian.com

How to foil NSA sabotage: use a dead man’s switch | Technology | theguardian.com.

Registering for nothing-to-see-here deadlines could help to sound the alert when a website has been compromised

 

 

Person typing on a computer keyboard

‘The deliberate sabotage of computers is an act of depraved indifference to the physical security and economic and intellectual integrity of every person alive.’ Photograph: Workbook Stock/Martin Rogers

 

The more we learn about the breadth and depth of the NSA and GCHQ‘s programmes of spying on the general public, the more alarming it all becomes. The most recent stories about the deliberate sabotage of security technology are the full stop at the end of a sentence that started on 8 August, when the founder of Lavabit (the privacy oriented email provider used by whistleblower Edward Snowden) abruptly shut down, with its founder, Ladar Levison, obliquely implying that he’d been ordered to secretly subvert his own system to compromise his users’ privacy.

It doesn’t really matter if you trust the “good” spies of America and the UK not to abuse their powers (though even the NSA now admits to routine abuse, you should still be wary of deliberately weakened security. It is laughable to suppose that the back doors that the NSA has secretly inserted into common technologies will only be exploited by the NSA. There are plenty of crooks, foreign powers, and creeps who devote themselves to picking away patiently at the systems that make up the world and guard its wealth and security (that is, your wealth and security) and whatever sneaky tools the NSA has stashed for itself in your operating system, hardware, applications and services, they will surely find and exploit.


Members of Congress denied access to basic information about NSA

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/aug/04/congress-nsa-denied-access

Documents provided by two House members demonstrate how they are blocked from exercising any oversight over domestic surveillance

Morgan Griffith’s requests for NSA information
Alan Grayson’s requests for NSA information

Capitol Hill

Members of Congress are increasingly frustrated at their inability to obtain even basic information about the NSA and FISA court. Photograph: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Members of Congress have been repeatedly thwarted when attempting to learn basic information about the National Security Agency (NSA) and the secret FISA court which authorizes its activities, documents provided by two House members demonstrate.

From the beginning of the NSA controversy, the agency’s defenders have insisted that Congress is aware of the disclosed programs and exercises robust supervision over them. “These programs are subject to congressional oversight and congressional reauthorization and congressional debate,” President Obama said the day after the first story on NSA bulk collection of phone records was published in this space. “And if there are members of Congress who feel differently, then they should speak up.”

But members of Congress, including those in Obama’s party, have flatly denied knowing about them. On MSNBC on Wednesday night, Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Ct) was asked by host Chris Hayes: “How much are you learning about what the government that you are charged with overseeing and holding accountable is doing from the newspaper and how much of this do you know?” The Senator’s reply:

The revelations about the magnitude, the scope and scale of these surveillances, the metadata and the invasive actions surveillance of social media Web sites were indeed revelations to me.”


Escandalosa censura de Google a Cuba por petición de EEUU: Medios y Blogs no pueden acceder a estadísticas

http://www.kaosenlared.net/america-latina/item/22157-escandalosa-censura-de-google-a-cuba-por-petici%C3%83%C2%B3n-de-eeuu-medios-y-blogs-no-pueden-acceder-a-estad%C3%83%C2%ADsticas.html

por Cubadebate

Miércoles, 20 de Junio de 2012 04:16

 

Google los remite ahora a la página del Departamento del Tesoro de Estados Unidos.

El servicio de Google Analytics amaneció hoy bloqueado para los usuarios de la Isla, según ha comprobado esta mañana Cubadebate.

Cuando desde una máquina en Cuba se intenta acceder al servicio, que utiliza la mayoría de los medios digitales y blogueros del país, aparece un mensaje que remite a la página del Departamento del Tesoro que vigila el cumplimiento de las sanciones establecidas por el bloqueo de los Estados Unidos:

We’re unable to grant you access to Google Analytics at this time.
A connection has been established between your current IP address and acountry sanctioned by the U.S. government. For more information, see http://www.ustreas.gov/offices/enforcement/ofac/.