Apple Says It Fixed CIA Vulnerabilities Years Ago

Yesterday, WikiLeaks released its latest batch of pilfered CIA material, five documents describing malicious software for taking over Apple MacBooks and iPhones, and wrote in an accompanying post that “the CIA has been infecting the iPhone supply chain of its targets,” prompting concerned readers to wonder if their iPhone or MacBook had been infected on the factory floor. In a statement, Apple says that is almost certainly not the case.

Fuente: Apple Says It Fixed CIA Vulnerabilities Years Ago


Wikileaks filtra nuevos documentos secretos sobre cómo “hackeaba” la CIA cualquier iPhone o Mac – El Mostrador

Bajo el nombre “Dark Matter” Wikileaks publicó una nueva tanda de documentos secretos, en los que detalla varios proyectos de la CIA para lograr infectar y “hackear” cualquier iPhone o Mac.

Fuente: Wikileaks filtra nuevos documentos secretos sobre cómo “hackeaba” la CIA cualquier iPhone o Mac – El Mostrador


With the latest WikiLeaks revelations about the CIA – is privacy really dead? | World news | The Guardian

Both the Snowden revelations and the CIA leak highlight the variety of creative techniques intelligence agencies can use to spy on individuals, at a time when many of us are voluntarily giving up our personal data to private companies and installing so-called “smart” devices with microphones (smart TVs, Amazon Echo) in our homes.So, where does this leave us? Is privacy really dead, as Silicon Valley luminaries such as Mark Zuckerberg have previously declared?

Fuente: With the latest WikiLeaks revelations about the CIA – is privacy really dead? | World news | The Guardian


WikiLeaks publishes ‘biggest ever leak of secret CIA documents’ | Media | The Guardian

The US intelligence agencies are facing fresh embarrassment after WikiLeaks published what it described as the biggest ever leak of confidential documents from the CIA detailing the tools it uses to break into phones, communication apps and other electronic devices.

Fuente: WikiLeaks publishes ‘biggest ever leak of secret CIA documents’ | Media | The Guardian


Wikileaks Dump Shows CIA Could Turn Smart TVs into Listening Devices

It’s difficult to buy a new TV that doesn’t come with a suite of (generally mediocre) “smart” software, giving your home theater some of the functions typically found in phones and tablets. But bringing these extra features into your living room means bringing a microphone, too — a fact the CIA is exploiting, according to a new trove of documents released today by Wikileaks.

Fuente: Wikileaks Dump Shows CIA Could Turn Smart TVs into Listening Devices


WikiLeaks filtra programa encubierto de la CIA que usa celulares y televisores como “micrófonos encubiertos” – El Mostrador

La información revelada hoy sobre “hacking” (ataque cibernético) es parte de una serie en siete entregas que define como “la mayor filtración de datos de inteligencia de la historia”.

Fuente: WikiLeaks filtra programa encubierto de la CIA que usa celulares y televisores como “micrófonos encubiertos” – El Mostrador


WikiLeaks posted medical files of rape victims and children, investigation finds | Media | The Guardian

The ‘radical transparency’ organization has published sensitive personal data belonging to hundreds of ordinary citizens, an investigation has revealed

Fuente: WikiLeaks posted medical files of rape victims and children, investigation finds | Media | The Guardian


[Updated] Wikileaks Leak Of Turkish Emails Reveals Private Details; Raises Ethical Questions; Or Not… | Techdirt

Important Update: Michael Best has now come out and said that it was actually he who uploaded the files in question, which he got from the somewhat infamous (i.e., hacked the Hacking Team) hacker Phineas Fisher. Through a somewhat convoluted set of circumstances, it appeared the files were associated with the Wikileaks leak when they were not — and then basically everyone just started calling each other names:

Fuente: [Updated] Wikileaks Leak Of Turkish Emails Reveals Private Details; Raises Ethical Questions; Or Not… | Techdirt


¿Cuáles son las responsabilidades que conlleva una filtración? | Derechos Digitales

Cada cierto tiempo surgen nuevas noticias que dan cuenta de cómo hackers y whistleblowers develan información de interés público, usualmente política. Incluso en algunos países latinoamericanos se han creado plataformas que permiten hacer denuncias anónimas, siguiendo la misma tendencia. Esta actividad ha venido a suplir la falta de canales formales de acceso a la información pública, pero pueden presentar algunos problemas.

Fuente: ¿Cuáles son las responsabilidades que conlleva una filtración? | Derechos Digitales


WikiLeaks threatens legal action against Google and US after email revelations | Technology | The Guardian

WikiLeaks threatens legal action against Google and US after email revelations | Technology | The Guardian.

 in New York

WikiLeaks Sarah Harrison
 WikiLeaks journalist Sarah Harrison addresses the media at the Geneva Press Club on Tuesday. Photograph: Pierre Albouy/Reuters

WikiLeaks is fighting back in an escalating war with both Google and the US government, threatening legal action the day after demanding answers for the tech giant’s wholesale handover of its staffers’ Gmail contents to US law enforcement.

The targets of the investigation were not notified until two and a half years after secret search warrants were issued and served by the FBI, legal representatives for WikiLeaks said in a press conference on Monday.

“We’re looking at legal action not only with Google but to those who actually turned in the order,” said Baltasar Garzón, the head of Julian Assange’s legal defence team. Calling the order illegal and arbitrary, Garzón said insisted “any information that would be used from the taking of documents [this way] will be considered as biased, illegal and will cancel the whole proceedings.”

“I’m not sure what craziness – what desperation – went into the US to make them behave this way, but this is … a clear violation of rights,” Garzón said.

“Our policy is to tell people about government requests for their data, except in limited cases, like when we are gagged by a court order, which sadly happens quite frequently,” a Google spokesperson said in a statement to the Guardian. “We’ve challenged many orders related to WikiLeaks which has led to disclosures to people who are affected. We’ve also pushed to unseal all the documents related to the investigation.”

Michael Ratner, a member of the Assange legal team in the US and president emeritus of the Center for Constitutional Rights, said that WikiLeaks had sent a letter to Google’s executive chairman, Eric Schmidt, asking why the company waited so long before notifying the targets of the warrants.

On Monday, Ratner went further, saying that WikiLeaks would decide on what legal action to take depending on Google’s response to the letter, which he said was expected within a week.

The notification of the court order was sent by email from Google to WikiLeaks on 23 December 2014 – just before Christmas, a typically quiet time for the news cycle – and was published on WikiLeaks’ site. Google said the legal process was initially subject to a nondisclosure or “gag” order that prohibited Google from disclosing the existence of the legal process.

Ratner told the Guardian that there were several questions as to what that legal process entailed. “Did Google go to court at all?” Ratner said. “Would they have notified us that that ‘we went to court and we lost?’ I don’t know.”

“If they didn’t go to court, that would not be a great move by Google, because you would expect them to litigate on behalf of their subscribers,” he said.

“Perhaps after the Snowden revelation, Google got nervous and decided to go to court,” Ratner added. “My big thing is: did they go to court initially? If they didn’t, I would consider that a real failure.”

The Google court order targeted three WikiLeaks employees: journalist Sarah Harrison, spokesperson and journalist Kristinn Hrafnsson and editor Joseph Farrell.

The wide-ranging scope of the order meant that all email content, including deleted emails, drafts, place and time of login, plus contact lists and all emails sent and received by the three targets – for the entire history of their email account up to the date of the order – had to be handed over to the FBI.


Wikileaks estudia demandar a Google por entregar información a EE UU | Tecnología | Cinco Días

Wikileaks estudia demandar a Google por entregar información a EE UU | Tecnología | Cinco Días.


Wikileaks estudia demandar a Google por entregar información a EE UU

Efe

El equipo jurídico del portal Wikileaks, liderado por el exjuez de la Audiencia Nacional española Baltasar Garzón, está estudiando emprender acciones legales contra Google por haber entregado a las autoridades estadounidenses información digital de periodistas de la web.

Así lo anunció hoy el propio jurista en una rueda de prensa en Ginebra, donde expuso la situación personal y jurídica en la que se encuentra el fundador de Wikileaks, Julian Assange, y todas las personas que trabajan en el portal responsable de la filtración de miles de documentos secretos de EEUU.

Garzón explicó que el pasado 23 de diciembre supieron que Google había transmitido a las autoridades estadounidenses toda la información digital con la que contaban de tres periodistas, los británicos Sarah Harrison y Joseph Farrell, y el islandés Kristinn Hrafnsson.

“La obtención de esa información es totalmente arbitraria e ilícita, la obtención ilegal de estos documentos puede impugnar todo el procedimiento”, afirmó Garzón, quien recordó que lo mínimo que Google habría debido hacer era informar a los periodistas de que las autoridades estadounidenses requerían dicha información.


Jacob Appelbaum: "La criptografía es una cuestión de justicia social"

Jacob Appelbaum: “La criptografía es una cuestión de justicia social”.

Appelbaum, una de las caras visibles del proyecto TOR, reclama que la sociedad sea consciente de que debe protegerse de los abusos del Estado con tecnología y nuevas leyes

“Están intentando asustar a la sociedad y decir a la ciudadanía que el uso de estas herramientas es terrorífico, pero lo que no nos cuentan es cómo ellos utilizan los sistemas de vigilancia para matar gente”

“Con las revelaciones de Snowden simplemente hemos pasado de la teoría a la certeza”

 

 

Jacob Appelbaum | Foto: COP:DOX  http://cphdox.dk/sites/default/files/styles/title-top/public/title/24276.jpg?itok=tGB_VZdM

Jacob Appelbaum, investigador, hacker y miembro de Proyecto Tor | Foto: CPH:DOX

 

 

Cryptoparties hay muchas. Cientos de ellas se celebran cada hora en cualquier parte del mundo, en un café, en la parte trasera de una tienda o incluso off the radar si se trata de compartir conocimientos con activistas o periodistas que trabajan en condiciones de riesgo. Las hay que ya han pasado a la historia como la organizada en 2011 via Twitter por la activista austaliana Asher Wolf, considerada la chispa de lo que en apenas semanas pasó a convertirse en un movimiento social a escala global, o la promovida por un –entonces aún desconocido—  Edward Snowden en un hacklab de Hawái cuando aún trabajaba para la NSA, y apenas un mes antes de contactar con Laura Poitras para revelarle el mayor escándalo de espionaje masivo conocido hasta el momento.

Sin embargo, una cryptoparty que reúna en una misma sala, precisamente, a la confidente de Snowden y directora del documental Citizenfour, Poitras; al activista, experto en seguridad informática y desarrollador de TOR, Jacob Appelbaum; y a William Binney –exoficial de inteligencia de la NSA convertido en whistleblower más de una década antes de que Snowden lo hiciera— solo hay una: la celebrada la semana pasada en el Bremen Theater de Copenhague con motivo del estreno del documental de Poitras en el festival internacional de cine documental CPH: DOX.

“Hace diez años nadie hubiera pensado en organizar un evento para hablar de esto, hubieran pensado que estábamos locos” comenta Jacob Appelbaum, uno de los gurús de la criptografía, miembro del equipo desarrollador de TOR y activista implacable en la lucha contra los sistemas de vigilancia masivos empleados por los gobiernos de distintos países. Eso demuestra que algo ha cambiado. Y lo dice la persona que precisamente inició en esto de la criptografía a la mismísima Poitras, cuyos conocimientos (y trayectoria cinematográfica, que incluía un corto documental sobre William Binney) fueron determinantes cuando Snowden eligió a quién revelaría su preciado secreto, aunque como el propio Citizenfour prefiere plantearlo, ella misma se eligió.

“Había empezado a utilizar criptografía cuando comencé a comunicarme con Jake”, contó Poitras. “Estaba muy interesada en su trabajo entrenando a activistas alrededor del mundo en cómo sortear los sistemas de vigilancia. Así que tuve que cargarme las pilas, me bajé algunas herramientas, en concreto usaba dos: PGP Email y chat OTR”, las mismas herramientas que Snowden enseñó a instalar a Glenn Greenwald para poder comunicarse de forma segura.

“Recuerdo que mandé un email a Jake explicándole quién era y el documental en el que estaba trabajando. Enseguida me contestó y me dijo que teníamos verificar las fingerprints, yo no tenía ni idea de lo que estaba hablando, así que me hice la entendida, le pedí unos minutos para ganar tiempo y me puse a buscar online de qué iba eso de las fingerprints“. “La verdad es que fue muy buen profesor y luego me enseñó muchas más cosas, que luego aparentemente fueron bastante oportunas cuando en enero de 2013 recibí el primer email de un tal Citizenfour pidiéndome mi clave pública”.